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Individual Highlight

LandViz: Visualization of Landscape Model Outputs to Support Management Decisions

Photo of The user-interface of LandViz showing LANDIS-II projections of quaking aspen biomass on the Chippewa National Forest after 100 years of “business as usual” management under current climate and (left) and a warmer and wetter climate (right). Melissa Lucash, Portland State University.The user-interface of LandViz showing LANDIS-II projections of quaking aspen biomass on the Chippewa National Forest after 100 years of “business as usual” management under current climate and (left) and a warmer and wetter climate (right). Melissa Lucash, Portland State University.Snapshot : Forest Service scientists developed an intuitive, browser-based tool called "LandViz" that allows stakeholders to easily visualize how climate and management scenarios may change a landscape.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Gustafson, Eric J. 
Research Location : Rhinelander, Wis.
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2016
Highlight ID : 1111

Summary

Forest managers need landscape modeling tools to project the consequences of management options while taking into account growth, disturbances, and climate; however, the overwhelming amount of output from such models makes it hard for managers and other stakeholders to interpret their projections. Forest Service scientists developed an intuitive, browser-based tool (LandViz) that allows stakeholders to easily visualize and analyze model output and collaborated with the Chippewa National Forest to use it for a climate change vulnerability assessment using the LANDIS-II landscape model. Identifying potential climate change impacts on forests is difficult because interactions among forest growth and mortality, climate change, management, and disturbances are complex and uncertain. LandViz enhanced the quality of managers’ collaboration with model experts and increased their ability to interpret model outputs. LandViz paints a picture of the realm of future possibilities, and the ability to visualize how climate and management scenarios may change a landscape is very powerful and compelling. It helps make the case for the need to manage in the context of change, rather than just attempting to maintain the status quo. Chippewa National Forest managers can now use LandViz to communicate and collaborate with external stakeholders for strategic planning and tactical decisions.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • Portland State University