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Individual Highlight

Building the Forest Inventory and Analysis Tree-ring Dataset

Photo of Interior west states showing Forest Inventory and Analysis plots (black dots) and plots with tree-ring data (red dots). Justin DeRose, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.Interior west states showing Forest Inventory and Analysis plots (black dots) and plots with tree-ring data (red dots). Justin DeRose, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.Snapshot : Tree-ring data collected as part of the Forest Inventory and Analysis program in the Interior West is being assembled into a massive dataset with many tens- of thousands of trees. Given the underlying sampling approach to the Forest Inventory and Analysis grid, the tree-ring data collected can be used for many novel research applications.

Principal Investigators(s) :
DeRose, R. JustinShaw, John D.
Research Location : Interior West, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico
Research Station : Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS)
Year : 2016
Highlight ID : 1063

Summary

The Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis Program measures forestland conditions at great extent with relatively high spatial resolution, including the collection of tree-ring data. Forest Service scientists describe the development of an unprecedented spatial tree-ring data set that enhances the baseline plot data by incorporating ring-width increment measured from tree cores. Previous use of increment cores was consistent with traditional forestry (stand age, site index, and vigor) but there are key differences in sampling approaches between foresters and dendrochronologists. They describe a framework for preparation, interpretation, and archiving of the Forest Inventory and Analysis tree rings. Early results suggest that the data produced by this framework are useful for growth-and-yield studies, stand dynamics, and dendroclimatology. The scientists discuss the potential for tree-ring data to become a standard component of the program. They also compare and contrast the applications and procedures of dendrochronology and forestry, and show how the two sources of data complement one another.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • James N. Long, Utah State University (Co-PI)