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Individual Highlight

Precision Targeting of Surveys to Eradicate the Asian Longhorned Beetle

Photo of The surface of the graph shows the probability of finding the Asian longhorned beetle within the infested area around Worcester, MA. Risk is estimated on a hectare scale. R. Talbot Trotter, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.The surface of the graph shows the probability of finding the Asian longhorned beetle within the infested area around Worcester, MA. Risk is estimated on a hectare scale. R. Talbot Trotter, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.Snapshot : Using data collected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Program, Forest Service research shows the potential to identify local patterns of dispersal by the beetle and target survey efforts.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Trotter, III, R. Talbot 
Research Location : New York, N.Y., Worcester, Mass., Bethel, Ohio
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2016
Highlight ID : 1061

Summary

When a breeding population of an invasive species becomes established in a novel environment, management tools often focus on either eradication of the species or slowing its spread. In either situation, it is necessary to understand how the organism moves through the landscape, and translate that knowledge into an assessment of risk to the surrounding landscape. Here, Forest Service researchers used data collected by the Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Program, which is operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine Program, to identify patterns of spread around existing infestations using simple graph theory and show how this data can be customized to local infestations to prioritize surveys and manage risk on a hectare-by-hectare basis. The results show that Asian longhorned beetle spread within an infestation does not occur randomly, and that patterns of spread among infestations vary. This approach represents a new and valuable use of existing data, and highlights the utility of interagency and interdepartmental collaboration in addressing complex environmental challenges.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Plant Protection and Quarantine Program

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