Search
US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
Stay Connected
You are here: Home / Experimental Forests & Ranges / Young Bay Experimental Forest — Disestablished Alaska

Young Bay Experimental Forest — Disestablished Alaska

The Young Bay Experimental Forest was established in 1959 on Admiralty Island about 24 miles southwest of Juneau, Alaska. It comprised 2,600 ha on the Tongass National Forest and was designed as a paired watershed for forest hydrology research. There was particular interest in studying the effects of logging on salmon spawning streams in Alaska. The vegetation was an old-growth forest with mature timber cover consisting primarily of Sitka spruce and western hemlock. It contained a glaciated watershed with two short streams that were incised through thick (> 6 m) glacial till in their lower reaches and rose rapidly (gradient >10 percent) from sea level to an elevation of 1,160m. Both streams supported small runs of pink and chum salmon, and a small population of Dolly Varden trout.

Research, Past and Present

Research on Young Bay focused on artificial channel studies. Stream-gauging stations were installed on both streams in 1958 and stage and temperatures were recorded from 1958 through 1966. An artificial stream channel was installed in 1967 and was used for studies of gravel bed movement, gravel morphology, and the survival of eggs and alevins in different substrate compositions and fine sediment concentration. Subsequent work included the development and testing of an electronic device to measure intra-gravel water flow was part of this study. Research on the electronic gravel device was discontinued following the development of a prototype device. An evaluation of fish movement up a baffled culvert was conducted in the mid-1980s.

Publications (partial list)

Walkotten, William J. 1973. A freezing technique for sampling streambed gravel. Research Note. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station PNW-RN-205. 8 p. Cited 13 times.

Meehan, William R.; Swanston, Douglas N. 1977. Effects of gravel morphology on fine sediment accumulation and survival of incubating salmon eggs. Research Paper. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station PNW-RP-205. 16 p. Cited 30 times.

Lotspeich, Frederick B.; Everest, Fred H. 1981. A new method for reporting and interpreting textural composition of spawning gravel. Research Note. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station PNW-RN-369. 11 p. Cited 154 times.

Bryant, Mason D. 1981. Evaluation of a small diameter baffled culvert for passing juvenile salmon. Research Note. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station PNW-RN-384. 8 p. Cited 13 times.

Orchard, Richard D. 1988. New method for measuring water seepage through salmon spawning gravel. Research Note. Pacific Northwest Research Station PNW-RN-482. 16 p.

Geier, Max G. 1998. Forest science research and scientific communities in Alaska: a history of the origins and evolution of USDA Forest Service research in Juneau, Fairbanks, and Anchorage. General Technical Report. Pacific Northwest Research Station PNW-GTR-426. 8 p. Cited 2 times.

Long-term Databases

The availability of data from Young Bay research is unknown at this time.

Facilities and Research Opportunities

All structures and equipment were removed from the site in 1994. Young Bay was disestablished in 2009. No further research is contemplated.

Latitude: 58° 8′ N (58.1333 decimal degrees)
Longitude: 134° 32′ W (134.5333 decimal degrees)