Speaker Biographies

ANN L. ACHESON - Acheson is the air resource management specialist in the Forest Service's Northern Region. She works closely with the state air regulatory agencies, the Ennvironmental Protection Agency, and other federal and state land management agencies monitoring the air pollution and smoke affecting forest lands or generated by Forest Service activities. She started with the Forest Service in 1982 as a biological aide on the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest in Colorado. She also worked in Colorado for the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station and the National Forest Systems weather program.

Acheson earned both a B.S. in wildlife biology and M.S. in air resource management from Colorado State University.

STEWART D. ALLEN - As a research social scientist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Juneau, Alaska, Allen designs and conducts long-term studies on social and economic issues facing southeast Alaska and management of the Tongass National Forest. He was a social scientist for both the Environmental Impact Statement Team and the Science Integration Team on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project.

Allen holds a B.A. in psychology and a B.A. in mass communications from the University of Utah, an M.A. in social and environmental psychology from Claremont Graduate School, and a Ph.D. in recreation management with a minor in Psychology from the University of Montana.

JAMES A. BURCHFIELD - Burchfield is the Director for the Bolle Center for People and Forests at the University of Montana. He is a 17-year veteran of the Forest Service. Prior to his Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project work, where he was co-lead on the social science team , he worked in International Forestry in Washington D.C. He has worked in timber and silviculture on the Ottawa, Wallowa-Whitman, Wayne-Hoosier, and Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forests. He served in Guatemala as a Peace Corps volunteer.

Burchfield has a B.S. in forest management from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in silviculture from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in natural resources sociology from the University of Michigan.

JAMES L. CLAYTON - Clayton is a research soil scientist at the Boise Aquatic Sciences Laboratory . He works on the Northern Rocky Mountains Project. He has worked for Forest Service Research for 29 years on soil disturbance, soil and rock properties related to slope stability, nutrient cycling in forested ecosystems, and acid deposition effects in alpine ecosystems.

Clayton holds a B.S. and an M.S. in soil sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in soil chemistry from Oregon State University.

SALLY COLLINS - Collins is Forest Supervisor on the Dechutes National Forest. She began her career with the Bureau of Land Management in Colorado, where she was a wilderness specialist and minerals planner. Collins and her family moved to Corvallis, Oregon in 1983, where she was a planner on the Siuslaw National Forest. Her first appointment on the Deschutes National Forest was as staff officer for lands and minerals. She was the Deputy Forest Supervisor prior to her current appointment.

Collins earned a B.S. in outdoor recreation from the University of Colorado and an M.A. in public administration from the University of Wyoming.

LINDA COLVILLE - Colville is a project manager with the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project with the Bureau of Land Management. Her previous positions have included Associate State Director for Colorado and associate service center director and project manager for the Automated Land Management Resource System Project. At the Department of Defense where she served intermittently for 18 years, Colville held technology management and human resources positions and was a professor of systems management.

Colville received her B.S. in technology management from the University of Maryland and her M.P.A. from George Mason University.

LISA K. CROFT - Croft is the Ochoco National Forest's environmental planner. During her tenure on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project, she worked as a terrestrial task team leader, focusing on plants. Previously she was the botanist on the Cleveland National Forest in California.

Croft has a B.S. in botany from the University of Hawaii and an M.S. in botany from the University of Washington. Her research focused on the paleoecology of the John Day Basin.

RUSSELL T. GRAHAM - Graham was a Deputy Science Integration Team Leader for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. For the past 18 years, he has been a research forester with the Intermountain Research Station in Moscow, Idaho. His silviculture and genetics research involves long-term forest productivity. He is currently studying the importance of organic matter for both short- and long-term forest productivity in the Rocky Mountains. This research is essential for determining the amount of woody material that should be left after harvesting and other cultural activities.

Graham holds a B.S. in forestry from the University of Montana and an M.S. in forestry and Ph.D. in forestry from the University of Idaho.

LYNN M. DECKER - Decker is the Aquatic and Fisheries Program leader with the Forest Service in Ogden, Utah.

She previously worked at the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Arcadia and Berkeley and was the fisheries program leader for the Pacific Southwest Region in San Francisco, California.

Decker earned a B.S. fisheries biology from the University of California, Davis and an M.S. in wildland resource science from the University of California, Berkeley.

SUE A. FERGUSON - Ferguson is an atmospheric scientist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station. In addition to developing new ways to derive, analyze, and map weather and climate patterns in complex terrain, she conducts research on climate variability and changes that affect ecosystem processes. She was previously a mountain weather and avalanche forecaster.

Ferguson received a B.S. in physics from the University of Massachusetts and Ph.D. in geophysics and atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington.

REBECCA A. GRAVENMIER - Gravenmier is the Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Spatial Team Leader for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. She is a natural resource specialist with the Bureau of Land Management in Portland, Oregon. She has served as the GIS lead for the for BLM's Western Oregon Resource Management Plans and numerous spotted owl analyses, including the Northwest Forest Plan. She has a strong background in rangeland management, GIS/data management and analysis, project management and planning.

Gravenmier earned her B.S. in range management from Utah State University.

LARRY E. HAMILTON - Hamilton is State Director of BLM's Montana and Dakotas State Office. The 20-year BLM employee was most recently the Associate State Director for BLM's Eastern States Office in Springfield, Virginia. He was also the manager of BLM's National Training Center in Phoenix, Arizona. He has held positions in Washington D.C., Alaska, and Colorado.

Hamilton earned a bachelor's degree in political science and a master's degree in speech communication from California State University in San Francisco. He earned a Ph.D. in organizational communication from the University of Denver.

RICHARD C. HANES - Hanes has worked in historic preservation for the past 25 years. For the past 18 years, he has been the regional cultural program lead for the Bureau of Land Management in the Great Basin and Pacific Northwest regions. He has worked with American Indian tribes on a wide range of public land issues.

Hanes received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Texas A&M University. He earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Oregon.

RICHARD W. HAYNES - Haynes was the economics team leader on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. He is a program manager with the Forest Service at the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Oregon, where he has worked for 20 years. He is responsible for the Forest Service's social and economic research in Washington, Oregon, and Alaska. His research is developing the analytical methods used to make long-term projections of market activity. He is also working to incorporate these models in Forest Service planning and policy analysis efforts. He has been an active participant in various studies of the economic effects of protecting habitat for the spotted owl and the Columbia/Snake River salmon.

Haynes earned his B.S. and M.S. in forest management from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in forest economics from North Carolina State University.

PAUL F. HESSBURG - Hessburg was a landscape ecology team co-lead for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. He is currently a research plant pathologist with the Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Wenatchee, Washington. He has worked on range and forest ecological studies focused on ecosystem change and vegetation pattern - disturbance process interactions. He lead the assessment team of the Eastside Forest Ecosystem Health Assessment.

Hessburg received a B.S. in forestry from the University of Minnesota in 1978 and a Ph.D. in forest pathology from Oregon State University in 1984.

JOHN (RANDY) HICKENBOTTOM - Hickenbottom is the threatened and endangered species program assistant for the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Region. He is a member of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's terrestrial ecology team. He is also the team leader for the interagency survey and manager workgroup, which implements specific standards and guidelines from the Northwest Forest Plan. He was the wildlife biologist for the Forest Service and Interagency EIS team for the Northwest Forest Plan. His work as a wildlife biologist has taken him to the Fremont, Ochoco, and Kaibab National Forests.

Hickenbottom received a B.S. in wildlife ecology from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.

AMY L. HORNE - Horne worked on the economic assessment and the integration framework for the Interior Columbia Ecosystem Management Project. Her work experience has ranged from managing eastern hardwood forests to conducting tree physiology research for Weyerhauser Company. She has also conducted ecological research at Oregon State University. She worked for the Office of Coastal Zone Management and the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C., where she coordinated and wrote numerous reports on environmental laws and policies.

Horne holds a Ph.D. in forestry and environmental studies and an M.S. in forest science, from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; and a Master of Public Administration and a B.A. in economics, from the University of Wisconsin.

MARK E. JENSEN - Jensen was a member of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's landscape ecology team. He is currently the regional soil scientist for the Northern Region, Range Air, Watershed and Ecology Staff in Missoula, Montana. He began his career in 1978 as a soil scientist on the Caribou National Forest. He was the forest hydrologist and soil scientist on the Humboldt National Forest. Prior to his current position, he was the quantitative ecologist for the Northern Region. His work experience includes development of plant community classification systems, ecological unit mapping, riparian and fluvial inventory design, ecological database and analytical system development, and design of implementation strategies for ecosystem management.

Jensen has an Honors Degree in physical geography from St. Andrews University, Scotland; a B.S. in natural resource management from the University of California, Berkeley; and a Ph.D. in soil science from Oregon State University.

LYNN KANEY - Kaney is currently the Acting District Ranger on the Newport Ranger District of the Colville National Forest. He was a member of the Eastside Environmental Impact Statement Team until March 1995. He has been with the Forest Service employee for 23 years including positions in fire and timber management, and National Environmental Policy Act analysis. He served as a member of the Chief's Timber Sale Appraisal Productivity Improvement Team.

Kaney holds a B.S. in forest management from Utah State University.

MICHAEL G. "SHERM" KARL - Karl is a rangeland ecologist and a range group co-lead for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. His professional experience includes research on the following subjects: moose in Alaska, black-footed ferrets in Wyoming, alternatives to poisons for control of black-tailed prairie dogs in Kansas, prescribed cattle grazing as a vegetation control method on conifer plantations in Oregon, and seed bank ecology on mixed-grass rangelands in Montana. He is a terrestrial ecologist who has chosen to specialize in plant ecology on rangeland ecosystems. He worked as a post-doctoral rangeland scientist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Miles City, Montana.

Karl earned his B.A. in biology at Ripon College, an M.S. in zoology with rangeland science emphasis at Fort Hays State University, and a Ph.D. in rangeland resources at Oregon State University.

ROBERT E. KEANE - For the last 15 years, Keane has developed various ecological computer models for the Fire Effects Research Project at the Intermountain Fire Sciences Lab in Missoula, Montana. These models have been geared toward both ecosystem management and research. His most recent research includes the synthesis of a First Order Fire Effects Model, construction of spatially-explicit, mechanistic ecosystem process models that include fire behavior and effects, status of whitebark pine in the northern Rocky Mountains, and spatial simulation of successional communities on the landscape using GIS and satellite imagery.

Keane received a B.S. in forest engineering from the University of Maine, an M.S. in forest ecology from the University of Montana, and a Ph.D. in forest ecology from the University of Idaho.

DANNY C. LEE - Lee worked on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's aquatic team. He is a research biologist at the Intermountain Research Station in Boise, Idaho, working on the enhancing fish habitats.

Lee was a research fellow at Resources for the Future in Washington, D.C. where he developed analytical methods and decision-support tools used to better understand and manage fish population, dynamics and land-aquatic interactions. During the last decade, he has been actively involved in integrated studies designed to benefit anadromous salmon and steelhead within the Columbia River Basin and resident trout throughout the Intermountain Region.

Lee earned a B.A. and M.S. in ecology from the University of Tennessee, an M.A. in applied statistics from Louisiana State University and a Ph.D. in wildlife and fisheries sciences from Texas A&M University.

KRISTINE M. LEE - Lee was the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's aquatic and riparian science team co-lead. She is the regional appeals and litigation coordinator for the Forest Service's Northern Region. She was previously the regional program manager on the fisheries, wildlife and rare plants staff for the Forest Service's Intermountain Region. She was also a district fisheries biologist on the Clearwater National Forest in Idaho. She has worked as a professional biologist with federal and state agencies and private industry.

Lee earned a B.S. in biology from Washington State University and an M.S. in fisheries science from the University of Alaska.

JOHN F. LEHMKUHL - Lehmkuhl worked on the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's Terrestrial Team. He is a research wildlife biologist with the Forest Service's Wenatchee Forestry Sciences Lab. He worked in various positions for the Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Smithsonian/Peace Corps Environmental Program, in and international work in India, Nepal and Costa Rica, and in private consulting. His current research interests are in landscape and disturbance ecology of Pacific Northwestern forests and their influences on the ecology and management of wildlife. Other research and management interests include the ecology of large herbivores, mammalian ecology, grassland ecology, conservation biology, and international conservation.

He received a B.S. in wildlife biology from Humboldt State University, an M.S. in wildlife ecology from the University of Montana and a Ph.D. in forest resources and wildlife science from the University of Washington.

BARBARA LEVESQUE - Levesque is a forester on the Salmon and Challis National Forests. She completed a landscape level assessment with the Intermountain Fire Sciences Laboratory which integrated technology from the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project into the forest planning process. She has been a sale preparation and planning forester for the last 17 years.

Levesque holds a B.S. in timber management from the University of Maine.

JAMES R. LYONS - Lyons is the Under Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and Environment. His primary responsibilities are to direct the policies and supervise the activities and programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service. He was previously a staff assistant with House Committee on Agriculture, where he was responsible for the policy and legislative activities of the committee affecting forestry and natural resources, conservation, environmental issues, pesticides and food safety. He was the agricultural advisor to [then] Congressman Leon Panetta.

He received a B.S. with High Honors from Cook College, Rutgers University and an M.A. in forestry from Yale University.

KENNETH D. MACDONALD - MacDonald is the forest fisheries biologist at the Wenatchee National Forest in Washington. He served on the Eastside EIS Team for two years. He was previously a zone fisheries biologist on the Mt. Hood and Wenatchee National Forests.

MacDonald received a B.S. in fisheries science and a B.S. in forest management from Oregon State University.

BRUCE G. MARCOT - Marcot was the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's terrestrial team co-lead. He is a wildlife ecologist with the Forest Service Ecosystems Processes Research Program at the Portland Forestry Sciences Lab. He participates in technology application projects dealing with forest planning and his focuses are wildlife population viability, biodiversity conservation, and ecologically sustainable forest planning. He recently worked on the Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team, Interagency Scientific Committee on the Northern Spotted Owl. He served as chief ecologist on a sustainable land use planning project spanning the easternmost portions of Russia and China. He was also part of a biodiversity planning team in India.

Marcot earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in natural resources planning from Humboldt University, where he taught wildlife ecology, mathematical and computer modeling of natural resources, and philosophy of science. He earned a Ph.D. in wildlife ecology from Oregon State University.

THOMAS J. MILLS - Mills is the Station Director for the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the Forest Service with research responsibilities in Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. Prior to this appointment he served in Washington D.C. as Associate Deputy Chief for Programs and Legislation, Staff Assistant to the Deputy Chief for Research, Director of the Resource Program and Assessment, Director of Policy Analysis, and Group Leader of Economics Reseach. He began his Forest Service career in 1972 and in addition to Washington, D.C., has worked for the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Stations.

Mills received a B.S. in forestry, a M.S. and Ph.D. in forest economics at Michigan State University.

STEVEN F. McCOOL - McCool was a social team co-lead for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. He is currently on an intergovernmental assignment with the Pacific Northwest Research Station's People and Natural Resources Program. When this assignment concludes, he will resume his duties as professor of wildland recreation management at the University of Montana's School of Forestry. He was formerly the director of the Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research at the University of Montana, responsible for administering a growing research program whose objective was to provide information to the state's tourism and recreation industry.

McCool earned his B.S. in forest resources management from the University of Idaho, his M.S. and Ph.D. from the School of Forestry at the University of Minnesota, where he emphasized social aspects of outdoor recreation management.

ROBERT H. NANEY - Naney is a wildlife biologist on the Okanogan National Forest and has participated in the North Cascades grizzly bear evaluation and subsequent recovery plan development. He served as the regional representative for the Furbearers and the Western Forest Carnivore Committee, a representative on the gray wolf recovery committee in Washington, and representative on interagency lynx committee in Washington, which was charged with developing conservation strategy for lynx. Naney began working for the Forest Service as a district biologist at Fremont National Forest, Oregon in 1977.

Naney earned a B.S. in wildlife biology from Colorado State University and an M.S. in wildlife management from Louisiana State University.

CHRISTINE G. NIWA - Niwa is a research entomologist with the Environmental Health and Protection Research Program at the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Corvallis, Oregon. She previously worked as an entomologist for Forest Pest Management with the Northern Region in Missoula, Montana. Her research interests include insect semio-chemical; cone, seed, and regeneration pests; and the ecological role of forest invertebrates.

Niwa earned a B.A. in physical anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley, an M.S. in forest resources from the University of Idaho, and a Ph.D. in entomology from Oregon State University.

ROGER D. OTTMAR - Ottmar is a research forester at the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station in Seattle, Washington. He has been with the station for 19 years. Ottmar has been an active participant in various studies to formulate and conduct research on prescribed fires and wildfires. He is also leading an effort to develop a national photo series for assessing fuel characteristics, and an effort to evaluate the exposure of wildland firefighters to smoke. He has authored and co-authored over 50 research publications and final reports and served as principal investigator on more than 60 grants, agreements, and co-ops between other USDA Forest Service Research Stations, governmental agencies, private corporations, and universities.

Ottmar received a B.S. in atmospheric sciences and an M.S. in forest management from the University of Washington.

C. KERRY OVERTON - Overton is the fishery biologist/technology transfer specialist with the Intermountain Research Station's Fish Habitat Research Work Unit in Boise, Idaho.

For 13 years, Overton was the forest fishery program manager and regional anadromous fish habitat coordinator on the Six Rivers National Forest and the Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Region. He worked on the Northwest Forest Plan and PACFISH, and developed fisheries technical tools to assist biologists and land managers in completing multi-scale habitat assessments and conservation/restoration strategies.

He earned a B.S. in biology/zoology and M.S. in fishery biology/aquatic ecology from Idaho State University.

WILLIAM C. PETERSON - Peterson was the Eastside Environmental Impact Statement Team's analyst prior to his present position as district silviculturist ont he Deschutes National Forest. During his 17 years in the Forest Service he has been involved in a variety of natural resource planning and environmental analysis assignments, including planning team leader, environmental coordinator, and forest economist. He led the analytical campaign for completion of the Malheur Forest Plan in 1990 and was directly involved in plan implementation. He is actively involved in community activities and professional forestry.

Peterson holds a B.S.F. degree in forest science from the University of New Hampshire, and an M.A. in silviculture from Oregon State University.

THOMAS M. QUIGLEY - Quigley is the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project's Science Integration Team Leader. He is also the Program Manager for the Managing Natural Disturbances to Sustain Forest Health Program of the Pacific Northwest Research Station. He is currently managing research that addresses natural disturbance regimes in forests and rangelands of Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. This program is focused on improving our understanding of disturbances roles in the development of forest and aquatic ecosystems, impacts on resiliency, and associated risks to human communities.

Quigley earned both a B.S. in watershed science and an M.S. in range economics from Utah State University. He has a Ph.D. in range economics from Colorado State University.

MARTIN G. RAPHAEL - Raphael is the chief research wildlife ecologist at the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Oregon. He has been working on techniques to assess biological diversity, habitat associations of forest wildlife, effects of landscape pattern on wildlife populations, and the ecology of threatened or sensitive species. He serves as team leader for the wildlife ecology team, whose members include researchers from Olympia, Washington and Corvallis, Oregon. Raphael recently served as the deputy leader of the Scientific Analysis Team and deputy leader of the Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team. He leads research in support of forest planning in the northwest. He authored and co-authored 2 books and 75 articles, and serves on the editorial board of the journal "Ecological Applications."

Raphael earned a B.A. in social sciences from California State University, Sacramento; a B.S. in conservation of natural resources, an M.S. in wildland resource science, and a Ph.D. in wildland resource science all from the University of California, Berkeley.

BRUCE E. RIEMAN - Rieman is a fishery research scientist with the Fish Habitats Work Unit of the Forest Service Intermountain Research Station in Boise, Idaho. His work focuses on the conservation management and the biology of native fishes. He has worked for over 20 years in aquatic research, management, and teaching throughout the Pacific Northwest prior to joining the Forest Service in 1992.

Rieman earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in fisheries management from the University of Idaho.

NICHOLAS E. REYNA - Reyna is an economist with the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. He has worked on both the Science Integration Team and the Eastside EIS Team. He formerly worked in Washington D.C. as a member of the Forest Service policy analysis staff. He was involved in reviewing spotted owl and Northwest Forest Plan planning efforts. Reyna has been with the Forest Service since 1977.

He earned a B.S. forest management and an M.S. in forest policy from Oregon State University.

HAROLD J. (HAL) SALWASSER - Salwasser is the Regional Forester for the Forest Service's Northern Region. He began his 19-year Forest Service career as the regional wildlife ecologist for the Pacific Southwest Region in San Francisco. In 1982, as national wildlife ecologist, he developed and coordinated the Forest Service Wildlife and Fish Habitat Relationships Program and subsequently became the deputy national director of wildlife and fisheries in Washington, D.C. In 1990, he spearheaded the New Perspectives Program for the Forest Service. He joined the University of Montana in Missoula in October 1992 as the Boone and Crockett Professor of Wildlife Conservation.

Salwasser holds a B.A. in biology from California State University, Fresno, and a Ph.D. in wildland resource science from the University of California, Berkeley.

ROGER E. SANDQUIST - Sandquist is a Forest Service entomologist at the Pacific Northwest Region in Portland, Oregon. He has been involved in technology development and application, technology transfer and training, and development and application of pest management tactics. He worked for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Forest Service in pesticide registration and pesticide use management. As a post-doctoral research associate at the Pennsylvania State University, he studied using gypsy moth sex attractants to manage their population levels.

Sandquist attended St. Cloud State University in Minnesota where he received a B.A. in biology. He received both an M.S. and Ph.D. in entomology from North Dakota State University.

JAMES R. SEDELL - Sedell is the aquatics team co-lead for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. He is also the aquatic/land interactions program manager for the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Corvallis, Oregon. As a research aquatic ecologist, Sedell has worked with the "Gang of Four" to develop the watershed and fish options which allowed assessment of risk to fish habitat and timber harvest impacts. He was one of seven national experts selected for the Indian Forest Management Assessment Team commissioned by the United States Congress and administered through the Intertribal Timber Council. He co-chaired a Forest Service field team tasked to develop a national Forest Service strategy for management of habitat for anadromous fish (PACFISH). Sedell participated as a panelist in the President's Forest Conference, was co-leader of the aquatic/watershed team which developed and scientifically assessed management options as part of the President's Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team (FEMAT) which lead to the Northwest Forest Plan.

Sedell holds a B.A. in philosophy from Willamette University and a Ph.D. in environmental biology with a minor in forensic chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh.

SIGNE SATHER-BLAIR - Sather-Blair is the Bureau of Land Management's Bruneau Resource Area Manager in Boise, Idaho. This resource area is 2.5 million acres in size and includes the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, several Wilderness Study Areas in the Owyhee Canyon lands, and important habitat redband trout, spotted frog, California bighorn sheep, and sage grouse. She was previously the district wildlife biologist for Lower Snake River District. She has also worked for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Among her significant accomplishments are the initiation and coordination of major interagency in stream flow studies for the Henry's Fork and South Fork of the Snake River and coordinating the wildlife habitat inventory study for the Lower Snake River Dams in Washington.

She received a B.S. in zoology from the University of Nebraska and an M.S. in wildlife ecology from South Dakota State University.

J. STEPHEN SHELLY - Shelly is the regional botanist for the Forest Service's Northern Region. During his 15-year professional career, he has worked in plant conservation biology, floristics of the northern Rocky Mountains and northwestern Great Basin, and threatened/endangered/sensitive plant species conservation. While employed by the Montana Natural Heritage Program, he established the rare plant conservation program for the State of Montana. Special research areas have included the floristics and ecology of peatlands in Montana, demographic monitoring of rare plant populations, and systematics of vascular plants. A regional reviewer for the Flora of North America Project, Shelly has been a member of the Vascular Plant Task Group for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project since 1994.

Shelly received a B.S. in botany from Miami University at Oxford, Ohio and an M.S. in systematic botany from Oregon State University.

CRAIG W. SHINN - Shinn is assistant professor of public administration, at the School of government, college of Urban and Public Affairs, at Portkand State University where he coordinates the specialization in Environnmntal and Natural Resources Policy and Administration. He has twenty years of experience in forest policy and researchand consults with public private and non-profit organizations. Most recently he was invloved witht he Seventh American Forest Congress held in Washington D.C. in early 1996.

Shinn holds a B.S. in forestry from the University of Maine, an M.P.A. in natural resource policy from Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon, and a Ph.D. in forest management from the University of Washington.

BRADLEY G. SMITH - Smith was a member of the Interior Columbia Basin's landscape ecology team. He accomplished studies on potential vegetation classification for Olympic National Park in 1978-1980; for southwestern Oregon in 1980-1988; for Colville National Forest in 1991, and Wenatchee National Forest in 1992. He was a developer of Analysis of Information and Diversity (AID) programs for computers; developed an hierarchical, general ecosystem model processor called FLEX-PC; and a short course instructor in ecological data analysis using personal computers for Ecological Society of America and for the Forest Service. Smith is a member of the Ecological Society of America, British Ecological Society, and International Association for Vegetation Science. He has authored numerous publications.

Smith received a B.S. in forestry from Utah State University and is currently working on a Ph.D. at Oregon State University.

ROBERT V. SMITH - Smith is the vice provost for research and the dean of the Graduate School at Washington State University (WSU). As WSU's chief research officer, he serves the policy, administrative, and technology transfer needs of a $115-million dollar per year enterprise. As graduate dean, he is responsible for policy development, oversight, and quality assurance for 70 master's and 44 doctoral programs located in seven colleges across a four-campus system. Smith was previously the dean of the College of Pharmacy at WSU, a James E. Bauerle Professor, and director of the Drug Dynamics Institute.

Smith earned a B.S. in pharmaceutical sciences from St. John's University in New York, and both an M.S. and a Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of Michigan.

JACK WARD THOMAS - Thomas is the Boone and Crockett Professor of Wildlife Conservation at Montana State University. He served as the 13th Chief of the Forest Service from 1993 to 1996. In 1990, Thomas was selected by the leaders of the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Fish and Wildlife Service to organize and lead the Interagency Scientific Committee that developed a management strategy for the northern spotted owl. He later led the Forest Ecosystem Management Assessment Team (FEMAT), in response to President Clinton's Forest Conference in Portland, Oregon. Thomas began his career as a wildlife manager and researcher with the Texas Game and Fish Commission. In 1966, he joined the Forest Service in Morgantown, West Virginia as a research wildlife biologist. Three years later, he was named to head the Urban Forestry and Wildlife Research Unit at Amherst, Massachusetts. In 1974, he became chief research wildlife biologist and project leader at the Forestry and Range Sciences Lab in La Grande, Oregon.

He received a B.S. in wildlife management from Texas A&M University, an M.S. in wildlife ecology from West Virginia University, and a Ph.D. in forestry (natural resources planning) from the University of Massachusetts.

RUSSELL F. THUROW - Thurow is stationed at the Intermountain Research Station, where he is the fisheries management and research biologist. He has over 20 years of experience in that field. Thurow has worked extensively with anadromous and non-anadromous salmonids in a diverse region of the Columbia River Basin. His focuses include species interactions, population dynamics, life history strategies, harvest management, sampling protocols, and disturbance effects. He has been employed by the University of Idaho, Washington Department of Fisheries, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Thurow earned a B.S. in fisheries from the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point and an M.S. in fisheries resources from the University of Idaho.

DAVID G. UNGER - Unger is the Associate Chief of the USDA Forest Service. Prior to this appointment, he was the Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest Systems, where he oversaw the wildlife and fisheries, range management, timber management and land management planning staffs. He was also director of watershed and air management. Before joining the Forest Service, he was the Associate Chief of the Soil Conservation Service and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and Environment.

A native of Michigan, Unger graduated from Antioch College with a bachelor's degree in earth sciences. He has master's degrees in political science and public administration from the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University, respectively.

JACK E. WILLIAMS - Williams is a science advisor and a fisheries program manager for the Bureau of Land Management in Washington, D.C. His previous work experience includes time spent as a visiting scholar in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of California at Davis. He worked for the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a consultation team leader, doing formal consultation on endangered species. He also served as a staff icthyologist. Williams has published more than 70 technical journal entries on various subjects such as ichthyology, taxonomy, aquatic ecology, endangered species management, ecosystem management, and conservation.

Williams completed his undergraduate studies in wildlife biology at Arizona State University. He received an M.S. in biology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and a Ph.D. in fisheries science from Oregon State University.

MICHAEL J. WISDOM - Wisdom is the regional wildlife ecologist for the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Region. He also works as a research scientist and technology transfer specialist for the Starkey Deer and Elk Research Project at the Forest Service Research Lab in La Grande, Oregon. During the past 17 years, he has actively participated in a variety of wildlife-landscape modeling efforts for the BLM and the Forest Service.

Wisdom received a B.S. in wildlife management from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, and an M.S. in wildlife science from New Mexico State University. He is a University of Idaho Ph.D. candidate. His field is forestry, range and wildlife.

ELAINE J. ZIEROTH - Zieroth was a member of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project Eastside EIS Team and terrestrial ecology team. She is currently a district ranger on the Idaho Panhandle National Forest's Bonners Ferry District. She has worked for the Forest Service and BLM in management, wildlife biology, range, fire and recreation. She is a certified Wildlife Biologist by the Wildlife Society and served on the Colorado Chapter Governing Board from 1982-85. She has been a writer-editor for "Women in Natural Resources" journal since 1987 and was a recipient of the "Natural Resource Manager of the Year" award given by the Colorado Wildlife Federation in 1987.

Zieroth holds a B.A. in biological sciences from California State University in Fresno and an M.A. in wildlife ecology from the University of California in Davis.