Fire Return Interval Departure

Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region Remote Sensing Lab
Publication_Date: May 2011
Title:
Fire Return Interval Departure
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
Other_Citation_Details:
This is a joint product of the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region Ecology Program;the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region Remote Sensing Lab; and The NatureConservancy-California. Authors: Hugh Safford, Regional Ecologist, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region; Kip van de Water, USDA Forest Service, Plumas National Forest; David Schmidt, The Nature Conservancy, Davis, CA.
Online_Linkage: http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/clearinghouse/r5gis/frid/
Description:
Abstract:
This polygon layer consists of information compiled about fire return intervals for major vegetation types on the 18 National Forests in California and adjacent land jurisdictions. Comparisons are made between pre-Euroamerican settlement and contemporary fire return intervals (FRIs). Current departures from the pre-Euroamerican settlement FRIs are calculated based on mean, median, minimum, and maximum FRI values. This map is a project of the USFS Pacific Southwest Region Ecology Program (http://fsweb.r5.fs.fed.us/program/ecology/).
Purpose:
This layer may be used for land and resource planning and assessment, as well as other natural resource applications such as fuels treatment planning, postfire restoration project design, management response to fire, and general ecological understanding of the historic and current occurrence of fire on the California National Forests and neighboring jurisdictions.
Supplemental_Information:
Information on pre-Euroamerican settlement FRIs was compiled from an exhaustive review of the fire history literature, expert opinion, and vegetation modeling (see Table 2). Contemporary FRIs were calculated using the California Interagency Fire Perimeters database (maintained by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection [CalFire-FRAP]). The vegetation type stratification was based on the CALVEG map (USDA Forest Service Remote Sensing Lab) for the California National Forests, grouped into 28 pre-settlement fire regime (PFR) types. See CALVEG mapping metadata: http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/clearinghouse/data.shtml
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/layers/ev_mid.html
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/mapping/
 and CalFire-FRAP Fire Perimeters database metadata:
http://www.frap.cdf.ca.gov/data/frapgisdata/select.asp
for data limitations in these datasets. 


Details about fire return interval specific fields:
(See Entity Attribute section for definitions of Existing Vegetation fields)


YLF: Year of Last Fire. This is year in which the polygon in question last experienced a firethat was recorded in the fire perimeter database. The fire perimeter database is not a perfect record of fire, and some regions in California are missing GIS data on all but the largest fires before the 1950’s. Most of the State is relatively complete for large and medium fires occurring after 1908 however, and we use this year as the baseline year for the FRID database.

TSLF: Time Since Last Fire. This is the number of years elapsed between the most recent fire recorded in the fire perimeters database and the version year of the FRID map being used. If the version year of the FRID map is 2010, and the polygon in question last burned in 1995, TSLF will read 15 (2010 minus 1995).

numFires: Number of Fires. The number of fires (according to the fire perimeters database) that occurred within a given polygon between 1908 and the version year of the FRID map being used. Small fires (generally <4 ha after 1950, <40 ha prior to 1950, see http://www.frap.cdf.gov/data/frapgisdata/select.asp for more info) are not included in this database, so this number may be an underestimate of actual post-1908 fire frequencies.

PFR: Presettlement Fire Regime. This field stratifies the landscape into areas historically characterized by different fire regimes (by 'historically', we refer to the three or four centuries before Euroamerican settlement). Each PFR is named for the dominant vegetation type supported by that PFR (Table 1). There are currently 28 PFRs in the FRID database, developed through consultation with California fire and vegetation ecologists and with reference to, among other sources, Sugihara et al. (2006), Barbour et al. (2007), and Sawyer et al. (2010). In most cases, multiple similar vegetation types (as identified by the CALVEG classification) are grouped within PFRs due to their similar relationship with fire. For example, the 'yellow pine' PFR includes seven CALVEG types; the 'chaparral and serotinous conifer' PFR includes 34 different CALVEG vegetation types (Table 1). Pre-Euroamerican settlement FRIs for most vegetation types in California can be estimated from dendrochronological and charcoal deposition records, although information is limited for some vegetation types (i.e. Coastal Dune, Coastal Sage Scrub, Desert Mixed Shrub). In some areas, such as southern California, there is little reliable information about pre-settlement distribution of vegetation types, so a current vegetation map (CALVEG) is used as the best available approximation. Some areas of the State used to support fire regimes and vegetation types that no longer exist there (i.e. Bigcone Douglas-Fir stands that have been converted to Chaparral, Chaparral and Coastal Sage Scrub stands that have been converted to grassland, desert vegetation types that now burn frequently due to invasion by cheat grass, yellow pine forests that have converted to mixed conifer due to lack of disturbance, etc.). In some cases this may complicate comparisons between pre-settlement and contemporary FRIs for areas which are currently dominated by non-analog vegetation types and fire regimes. Although areas mapped as grasslands and meadows are included in the GIS layer, FRI and departure statistics are not calculated for these types because reliable information about pre-Euroamerican settlement fire regimes is lacking.

FireRegimeGrp: Fire Regime Group. This field assigns the standard National Fire Plan Fire Regime Group to each PFR. The Fire Regime Group combines fire frequency and fire severity, and pertains to the action of fire in the PFR before Euroamerican settlement. 

 Fire Regime         Fire frequency           Fire severity
    Group
        I                      0-35 years          Low (surface fires) to mixed (<75% of dominant overstory vegetation replaced by fire)
       II                    0-35 years            High (>75% of dominant overstory vegetation replaced by fire)
      III                    35-100 years          Mixed
      IV                    35-100 years          High
      V                      100+ years            High

CurrentFRI: The current fire return interval is calculated by dividing the number of years in the fire record (e.g., 2010-1908=103 years inclusive) by the number of fires occurring between 1908 and the current year in a given polygon plus one (CurrentFRI = Number of years/Number of fires +1). Although fires prior to 1908 are recorded in the fire perimeter database, they are not included in this analysis due to lack of consistency in reporting (1908 is the year that the US Forest Service began to formally record information on size and location of major fires).
CurrentFRI is derived by overlaying the fire perimeters on the PFR polygons and summing the number of fires affecting each polygon after 1908.


MeanRefFRI: The mean reference fire return interval is an approximation of how often, on average, a given PFR likely burned in the three or four centuries prior to significant Euroamerican settlement (i.e., before the middle of the 19th century; Table 3). MeanRefFRI values are averages of mean FRI values taken from an exhaustive review of the published and unpublished literature pertaining to pre-Euroamerican settlement fire occurrence (Table 3). Most mean FRI values used in this analysis are derived from small-scale (<4 ha) composite fire histories including records from multiple trees in a defined area. Composite FRIs represent the fire history of a given area better than point FRIs (derived from a single tree) because some fire events fail to scar every recording tree within the fire perimeter, especially in regimes characterized by frequent low intensity fire (Collins and Stephens, 2007). Furthermore, composite FRIs are more sensitive and better suited to analyzing changes in fire occurrence than point FRIs (Dieterich, 1980). While there is some variability introduced by using composite FRIs from different sized areas, they are less likely to underestimate pre-Euroamerican settlement mean FRI values than point FRIs. Some PFRs, such as Yellow Pine and Dry Mixed Conifer, burned very frequently (mean FRIs of 11-12 years), while others such as Spruce-Hemlock and Desert Mixed Shrub burned very infrequently (mean FRIs of 275-636 years). A high degree of confidence can be placed in the validity of the FRI values of most conifer PFRs, especially in the Sierra Nevada, due to the abundance of published dendrochronological studies. Less confidence is afforded to the FRI values of PFRs in which pre-Euroamerican fire history is less well-studied, such as California Juniper, Desert Mixed Shrub, Semi-Desert Chaparral, and Silver Sagebrush. For shrub-dominated PFRs in which pre-settlement fires are difficult to detect due to lack of dendrochronological evidence, FRI values were derived from other types of data, such as charcoal in sediment cores, and expert quantitative estimates. Ignitions by indigenous peoples were likely a large component of the pre-Euroamerican settlement fire record in some PFRs, such as Redwood and Oak Woodland, and are difficult or impossible to differentiate from lightning ignitions (Anderson and Moratto, 1996). Some vegetation types in certain areas were probably maintained mostly by pre-Euroamerican anthropogenic fire regimes, which may have resulted in vegetation type conversions in some parts of the landscape prior to Euroamerican arrival. Widespread indigenous ignitions were probably uncommon in other PFRs, however, such as Subalpine Forest and Lodgepole Pine.  Regardless, no attempt is made in this analysis to differentiate between lightning and indigenous ignitions. The final FRI values used in this analysis, and the sources from which they were derived, are presented in Table 3.

MedianRefFRI: The median reference fire return interval is an approximation of the center of pre-Euroamerican FRI distributions (Table 3). Because FRI distributions are often skewed (with more short or long intervals, depending on the PFR), median FRI values may be a better approximation of how often a given PFR likely burned prior to Euroamerican settlement than mean FRIs. MedianRefFRI values are averages of median FRIs taken from an exhaustive review of the published and unpublished literature pertaining to pre-Euroamerican settlement fire occurrence. Most median FRI values used in this analysis are derived from small-scale (<4 ha) composite fire histories including records from multiple trees in a defined area. In a few cases, explicit information on median FRIs was not available ('NA' in Table 3); in these cases we used the mean FRI for analysis.


MinRefFRI: This is the mean of the minimum reference FRIs reported in the literature. The minimum reference fire return interval is an approximation of the minimum number of years between fires in a given PFR prior to Euroamerican settlement. An estimate of the lower bound of the FRI distribution facilitates better characterization of variability in pre-settlement fire regimes than measures of central tendency alone (i.e. mean or median). This allows managers to determine whether a given area is approaching or exceeding the historic range of variation in FRI. MinRefFRI values are averages of minimum FRIs taken from an exhaustive review of the published and unpublished literature pertaining to pre-Euroamerican settlement fire occurrence. Thus, the minimum values described in this assessment are not absolute minimums, but typical minimum values that would be expected across the  geographical range of the PFR. Most minimum FRI values used in this analysis are derived from small-scale (<4 ha) composite fire histories including records from multiple trees in a defined area. 


MaxRefFRI: This is the mean of the maximum reference FRIs reported in the literature. The maximum reference fire return interval is an approximation of the maximum number of years between fires in a given PFR prior to Euroamerican settlement (Table 2). An estimate of the upper bound of the FRI distribution facilitates better characterization of variability in pre- settlement fire regimes than measures of central tendency alone (i.e. mean or median). This allows managers to determine whether a given area is approaching or exceeding the historic range of variation in FRI. MaxRefFRI values derive from an exhaustive review of the published and unpublished literature pertaining to pre-Euroamerican settlement fire occurrence. Thus, the maximum values described in this assessment are not absolute maximums, but typical maximum values that would be expected across the geo-graphical range of the PFR. Most maximum FRI values used in this analysis are derived from small-scale (<4 ha) composite fire histories including records from multiple trees in a defined area.

MeanFreqDep: The departure of current FRI from reference mean FRI in percent (fire return interval departure, FRID). This measure does not return to zero when a fire occurs, unlike FRID values used in some other analyses (van Wagtendonk et al., 2002). Instead, the following formulas are used to calculate FRID: 
[1-(MeanRefFRI/CurrentFRI)]*100 
when current FRI is longer than reference FRI (the common condition in most coniferous PFRs), and 
-[1- (CurrentFRI/MeanRefFRI)]*100 
(common in some shrub-dominated PFRs, and areas in the Wildland Urban Interface). For areas dominated by PFRs with a mean reference FRI greater than 103 years, and that have not burned in the period of historical record considered in this analysis
(i.e. since 1908), the FRID is assumed to equal zero.

MedianFreqDep: The departure of current FRI from reference median FRI in percent (fire return interval departure, FRID). This measure does not return to zero when a fire occurs, unlike FRID values used in some other analyses (van Wagtendonk et al., 2002). Instead, the following
formulas are used to calculate FRID: 
[1-(MedianRefFRI/CurrentFRI)]*100 
when current FRI is longer than reference FRI (the common condition in most coniferous PFRs), and 
-[1-(CurrentFRI/MedianRefFRI)]*100
 (common in some shrub-dominated PFRs, and areas in the Wildland Urban Interface). For areas dominated by PFRs with a median reference FRI greater than 103 years, and that have not burned in the period of historical record considered in this analysis (i.e. since 1908), the FRID is assumed to equal zero. In a few cases, explicit information on median FRIs was not available ('NA' in Table 3); in these cases we used the mean FRI for analysis.

MinFreqDep: The departure of current FRI from reference minimum FRI in percent (fire return interval departure, FRID). This measure does not return to zero when a fire occurs, unlike FRID values used in some other analyses (van Wagtendonk et al., 2002). Instead, the following
formulas are used to calculate FRID: 
[1-(MinRefFRI/CurrentFRI)]*100 
when current FRI is longer than reference FRI (the common condition in most coniferous PFRs), and
-[1-(CurrentFRI/MinRefFRI)]*100 
(common in some shrub-dominated PFRs, and areas in the Wildland Urban Interface). For areas dominated by PFRs with a minimum reference FRI greater than 103 years, and that have not burned in the period of historical record considered in this analysis (i.e. since 1908), the FRID is assumed to equal zero.

MaxFreqDep: The departure of current FRI from reference maximum FRI in percent (fire return interval departure, FRID). This measure does not return to zero when a fire occurs, unlike FRID values used in some other analyses (van Wagtendonk et al., 2002). Instead, the following
formulas are used to calculate FRID:
 [1-(MaxRefFRI/CurrentFRI)]*100 
when current FRI is longer than reference FRI (the common condition in most coniferous PFRs), and
-[1- (CurrentFRI/MaxRefFRI)]*100 
(common in some shrub-dominated PFRs, and areas in the Wildland Urban Interface). For areas dominated by PFRs with a maximum reference FRI greater than 103 years, and that have not burned in the period of historical record considered in this analysis (i.e. since 1908), the FRID is assumed to equal zero.

MeanCC_FRI: The mean condition class (FRI) is a measure of the extent to which contemporary fires (i.e. since 1908) are burning at frequencies similar to the frequencies that occurred prior to Euroamerican settlement, with the mean reference FRI as the basis for comparison. MeanCC_FRI categorizes the percent differences calculated in MeanFreqDep using the  following scale: 0 to 33% departure = CC1, 33 to 67% departure = CC2, and >66% departure = CC3. Negative condition classes (i.e. where fires are burning more often that under pre- settlement conditions) are categorized on the negative of the same scale: 0 to -33% = CC-1, -33 to -67% = CC-2, <-67% = CC-3. CC1 and CC-1 are mapped in the same class because they are both within 33% of the mean pre-settlement value.

MedianCC_FRI: The median condition class (FRI) is a measure of the extent to which contemporary fires (i.e. since 1908) are burning at frequencies similar to the frequencies that occurred prior to Euroamerican settlement, with the median reference FRI as the basis for comparison. MedianCC_FRI categorizes the percent differences calculated in MedianFreqDep using the following scale: 0 to 33% departure = CC1, 33 to 67% departure = CC2, and >66% departure = CC3. Negative condition classes (i.e. where fires are burning more often that under pre-settlement conditions) are categorized on the negative of the same scale: 0 to -33% = CC-1, -33 to -67% = CC-2, <-67% = CC-3. CC1 and CC-1 are mapped in the same class because they are both within 33% of the median pre-settlement value.

MinCC_FRI: The mean condition class (FRI) is a measure of the extent to which contemporary fires (i.e. since 1908) are burning at frequencies similar to the frequencies that occurred prior to Euroamerican settlement, with the minimum reference FRI as the basis for comparison. MinCC_FRI categorizes the percent differences calculated in MinFreqDep using the following scale: 0 to 33% departure = CC1, 33 to 67% departure = CC2, and >66% departure = CC3. Negative condition classes (i.e. where fires are burning more often that under pre-settlement conditions) are categorized on the negative of the same scale: 0 to -33% = CC-1, -33 to -67% = CC-2, <-67% = CC-3. CC1 and CC-1 are mapped in the same class because they are both within 33% of the mean pre-settlement value. This metric allows managers to make defensible determinations of areas of significant frequency departures (i.e. current vs. pre-settlement). Areas where MinFreqDep and MinCC_FRI are very low (i.e. very negative) are locations where fire currently occurs much more frequently than it did prior to Euroamerican settlement, and the current FRI is likely below the historic range of variability.

MaxCC_FRI: The mean condition class (FRI) is a measure of the extent to which contemporary fires (i.e. since 1908) are burning at frequencies similar to the frequencies that occurred prior to Euroamerican settlement, with the maximum reference FRI as the basis for comparison. MaxCC_FRI categorizes the percent differences calculated in MaxFreqDep using the following scale: 0 to 33% departure = CC1, 33 to 67% departure = CC2, and >66% departure = CC3. Negative condition classes (i.e. where fires are burning more often that under pre-settlement conditions) are categorized on the negative of the same scale: 0 to -33% = CC-1, -33 to -67% = CC-2, <-67% = CC-3. CC1 and CC-1 are mapped in the same class because they are both within 33% of the mean pre-settlement value. This metric allows managers to make defensible determinations of areas of significant frequency departures (i.e. current vs. pre-settlement). Areas where MaxFreqDep and MaxCC_FRI are very high are locations where fire currently occurs much less frequently than it did prior to Euroamerican settlement, and the current FRI is likely above the historic range of variability.

NPS_FRID: This FRID measure was developed by the National Park Service for the southern Sierra Nevada (Caprio et al. 1997). It is based on this formula: FRID = [(MaxRefFRI - TSLF)/MaxRefFRI]. This measure differs from the FreqDep and CC_FRI measures in that it does not consider the cumulative fire history of the polygon since 1908, but only the time since last fire (TSLF).

NPS_FRID_Index: This is an index of fire frequency departure derived from NPS_FRID. Values of NPS_FRID <-5 are 'extreme'; values between -5 and -2 are 'high'; values between -2 and 0 are 'moderate'; values >0 are 'low'.

NPS_MeanFRID: This is the NPS_FRID measure calculated using the MeanRefFRI instead ofthe MaxRefFRI.
Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 2010
Currentness_Reference:
ground condition
Status:
Progress: Complete
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: Annually
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -117.707456
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -116.328640
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 33.860596
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 32.647124
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword: Comparison of historic and current fire frequencies
Theme_Keyword: Fire Return Interval Departure
Theme_Keyword: FRID
Place:
Place_Keyword: California National Forests and adjacent jurisdictions
Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
Not recommended for use at scales greater than 1:24000
Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Hugh Safford
Contact_Organization: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region
Contact_Position: Regional Ecologist
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 707-562-8934
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: hughsafford@fs.fed.us
Native_Data_Set_Environment:
Microsoft Windows XP Version 5.1 (Build 2600) Service Pack 3; ESRI ArcCatalog 9.3.1.4000
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Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Direct_Spatial_Reference_Method: Vector
Point_and_Vector_Object_Information:
SDTS_Terms_Description:
SDTS_Point_and_Vector_Object_Type: G-polygon
Point_and_Vector_Object_Count: 17883
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Spatial_Reference_Information:
Horizontal_Coordinate_System_Definition:
Planar:
Map_Projection:
Map_Projection_Name: Albers Conical Equal Area
Albers_Conical_Equal_Area:
Standard_Parallel: 34.000000
Standard_Parallel: 40.500000
Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -120.000000
Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.000000
False_Easting: 0.000000
False_Northing: -4000000.000000
Planar_Coordinate_Information:
Planar_Coordinate_Encoding_Method: coordinate pair
Coordinate_Representation:
Abscissa_Resolution: 0.000100
Ordinate_Resolution: 0.000100
Planar_Distance_Units: meters
Geodetic_Model:
Horizontal_Datum_Name: North American Datum of 1983
Ellipsoid_Name: Geodetic Reference System 80
Semi-major_Axis: 6378137.000000
Denominator_of_Flattening_Ratio: 298.257222
Vertical_Coordinate_System_Definition:
Altitude_System_Definition:
Altitude_Resolution: 0.000100
Altitude_Encoding_Method: Explicit elevation coordinate included with horizontal coordinates
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Entity_and_Attribute_Information:
Detailed_Description:
Entity_Type:
Entity_Type_Label: FRID_ClevelandNatForest10_1
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: OBJECTID
Attribute_Definition:
Internal feature number.
Attribute_Definition_Source:
ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SHAPE
Attribute_Definition:
Feature geometry.
Attribute_Definition_Source:
ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Coordinates defining the features.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SAF_COVER_TYPE
Attribute_Definition:
SAF Western Forest Cover Types
Attribute_Definition_Source:
see http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table060c.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SRM_COVER_TYPE
Attribute_Definition:
SRM Rangeland Cover Types
Attribute_Definition_Source:
see http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table200.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: REGIONAL_DOMINANCE_TYPE_1
Attribute_Definition:
CALVEG Type
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table038.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: OS_TREE_DIAMETER_CLASS_1
Attribute_Definition:
Overstory Tree Diameter Class
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table202.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: TREE_CFA_CLASS_1
Attribute_Definition:
Tree Cover From Above (CFA) mid level classes
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table194.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: REGIONAL_DOMINANCE_TYPE_2
Attribute_Definition:
Secondary CALVEG Type
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table038.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: OS_TREE_DIAMETER_CLASS_2
Attribute_Definition:
Secondary Overstory Tree Diameter Class
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table202.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: COVERTYPE
Attribute_Definition:
Vegetation Cover Type
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table037.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: CON_CFA
Attribute_Definition:
Conifer Cover From Above
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table203.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: HDW_CFA
Attribute_Definition:
Hardwood Cover From Above
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table203.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SHB_CFA
Attribute_Definition:
Shrub Cover From Above
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table203.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: TOTAL_TREE_CFA
Attribute_Definition:
Total Tree Cover From Above - 10 percent classes
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table203.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: WHRLIFEFORM
Attribute_Definition:
Wildlife Habitat Relationships, Standards for Lifeform
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table114d.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: WHRTYPE
Attribute_Definition:
Wildlife Habitat Relationships, Vegetation Type (WHRTYPE)
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table114a.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: WHRSIZE
Attribute_Definition:
Wildlife Habitat Relationships, Standards for Tree Size
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table114b.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: WHRDENSITY
Attribute_Definition:
Wildlife Habitat Relationships, Standards for Canopy Closure (Tree Density)
Attribute_Definition_Source:
http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/tables/table114c.html
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: YLF
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: TSLF
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: LastFireName
Attribute_Definition:
Name of last fire to occur in this polygon
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: numFires
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PFR
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: fireRegimeGrp
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: currentFRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: meanRefFRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: medianRefFRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: minRefFRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: maxRefFRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: meanFrqDep
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: medianFrqDep
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: minFrqDep
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: maxFrqDep
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: meanCC_FRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: medianCC_FRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: minCC_FRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: maxCC_FRI
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: NPS_FRID
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: NPS_FRID_Index
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: NPS_MeanFRID
Attribute_Definition:
see Supplemental Information section
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Acres
Attribute_Definition:
Acres calculated from Shape_Area
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Hectares
Attribute_Definition:
Hectares calculated from Shape_Area
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SHAPE_Length
Attribute_Definition:
Length of feature in internal units.
Attribute_Definition_Source:
ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Positive real numbers that are automatically generated.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: SHAPE_Area
Attribute_Definition:
Area of feature in internal units squared.
Attribute_Definition_Source:
ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Positive real numbers that are automatically generated.
Overview_Description:
Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
For a description of Existing Vegetation attributes in this dataset and a listing of valid values, go to the Remote Sensing Lab Forest Resource Database Dictionary (FRDB) at http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/projects/frdb/layers/ev_mid.html

For a description of Fire Return Interval attributes in this dataset and a listing of valid values, go to the Supplemental Information section or go to http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/rsl/clearinghouse/r5gis/frid/
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Distribution_Information:
Resource_Description: Downloadable Data
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Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20110510
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region
Contact_Person: Hugh Safford
Contact_Position: Regional Ecologist
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 707-562-8934
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: hughsafford@fs.fed.us
Metadata_Standard_Name: FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001-1998
Metadata_Time_Convention: local time
Metadata_Extensions:
Online_Linkage: http://www.esri.com/metadata/esriprof80.html
Profile_Name: ESRI Metadata Profile
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