White Flowered Forbs

White Flowered Forbs
African rue
Broadleaved pepperweed
Field bindweed
Hary whitetop
Horehound
Lens-podded hoarycress
Onionweed
Oxeye daisy
Poison hemlock
White clover
White sweetclover
Whitetop

 

Lens-podded Hoarycress
Cardaria chalepensis (L.) Hand.-Maz. (Mustard family, Brassicaceae)
 

Description

Multi-stemmed perennial forb (may take on the appearance of a shrub), 8 to 25-1/2 inches tall; seed production is prolific; new shoots arise from buds on lateral roots or root fragments; establishes dense stands that exclude other vegetation.

Leaves: Gray-green, alternate, obovate, lanceolate, and oblong to elliptic; surfaces, especially lower, sparsely to densely covered with short white hairs, margins irregularly toothed to entire; basal leaves short-stalked; upper leaves sessile, with rounded to acute- lobed bases that clasp the stem, 3 inches long and 1 inch wide or smaller.

Flowers: Flowers April to August; inflorescences often flat- topped; small (3/16 inch long), fragrant, white, 4-petaled flowers are numerous; sepals are glabrous.

Fruits: Pods disc-shaped, round to broadly (ob)ovate or barely kidney-shaped in outline, 1/8 to 3/8 inch long, 1/8 to 1/4 inch wide, glabrous; style persistent, 1/16 to 1/8 inch long at the apex; seeds 1 to 2 per chamber, ovoid, slightly flattened, reddish-brown, less than 1/8 inch long and 1/16 inch wide.

Habitat

Cultivated and disturbed or degraded moist sites in meadows, grassland, chaparral, woodland, forest, and riparian communities, and roadsides; generally grows on alkaline to saline soils, but tolerates many soil types and moisture conditions within elevations that generally range from 3,300 to 6,000 feet.

Propagation/Phenology

Reproduces vegetatively from creeping roots and less importantly by seed. This species is an aggressive weed; mature plants develop extensive systems of persistent, deep vertical and horizontal roots to depths of 6-1/2 feet or more. Root fragments generate new plants, but regeneration is poor in dry soils.

Comments

Native to central Asia; this species is difficult to distinguish from hairy whitetop and whitetop in the seedling and vegetative states; lens-podded hoarycress competes poorly with shrubs in natural communities. Arizona prohibited noxious weed and New Mexico Class A noxious weed.

Collage of images for lens-podded Hoarycress

 
Forest Service Shield
Invasive plants and weeds of the national forests and grasslands in the southwestern region
Lens-podded hoarycress flowers Lens-podded hoarycress plants Lens-podded hoarycress fruit Lens-podded hoarycress plants