Pink, Rose, Red, or Purple Flowered Forbs

Pink, Rose, Red & Purple Flowered Forbs
Alfalfa
Black henbane
Blue Mustard
Bull thistle
Canada thistle
Common burdock
Diffuse knapweed
Hounds-tongue
Iberian knapweed
Meadow knapweed
Musk thistle
Purple loosestrife
Purple starthistle
Red clover
Redstem filaree
Russian knapweed
Scotch thistle
Spiny plumeless thistle
Spotted knapweed
Squarrose knapweed
Tall morning-glory
Teasel

 

Blue Mustard
Chorispora tenella (Pall.) DC. (Mustard family, Brassicaceae)
 

Description

Prostrate or erect, single or branched stemmed, clump- or patch- forming winter annual forb; 2 to 20 inches tall; shallow to stout taproot; seedlings have oval and somewhat glandular leaves.

Leaves: Rosette leaves oblong to oblanceolate, typically sparsely covered with minute glandular hairs; foliage sparsely to moderately covered with simple, minute glandular hairs that are sticky to touch; stems leafy, branched mostly from the base; leaves green, alternate, elliptic or oblong to lanceolate or oblanceolate; lower stem leaves petioled, 1-1/8 to 1-3/8 inches long, with wavy toothed to pinnately lobed margins; upper stem leaves are sessile, with entire to wavy- toothed margins.

Flowers: Flowers March to May; flowers showy in elongated clusters, 4-petalled, pale purple to bluish-purple, narrowly clawed, 3/8 to 1/2 inch long; sepals 4, usually purple with narrow membranous margins, separate but forming a tube, 1/4 to 5/16 inch long.

Fruit: Fruit is a silique, long upturned, cylindrical capsule with an elongated beak about 1-1/8 to 1-3/4 inches long and 1/16 to 3/32 inch wide; containing round, reddish-brown spherical seeds 1/16 inch in diameter; usually remain within the pod segment.

Habitat

Blue mustard occurs in dry, disturbed sites such as waste places, pastures, and along roadsides and railroad rights-of-way within elevations that generally range below 7,500 feet.

Propagation/Phenology

Seedlings exist as basal rosettes until flowering stems are produced in early spring. Reproduces by seed; viable seeds can be produced 10 days after bloom.

Comments

Native to Eurasia; the plant has a strong scent which is generally considered unpleasant. This species generally occurs as a weed in wildland areas of the Southwestern Region rather than as an invasive plant.

Collage of 4 images of Blue mustard

 

 

 
Forest Service Shield
Invasive plants and weeds of the national forests and grasslands in the southwestern region
blue mustard fruit blue mustard plants blue mustard flowers