USDA Forest Service

Pacific Southwest Research Station

 
Pacific Southwest
Research Station

800 Buchanan Street
Albany, CA 94710-0011
(510) 883-8830
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Publications and Products

Title: Uses of pinyon and juniper

Authors: Knaebe, Mark

Date: 2008

Publication In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Shaw, John D.; Ford, Paulette L., compilers. 2008. Ecology, management, and restoration of pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine ecosystems: combined proceedings of the 2005 St. George, Utah and 2006 Albuquerque, New Mexico workshops. Proceedings RMRS-P-51. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 165-169.

Abstract: There is an overabundance of pinyon and juniper, especially in the Southwest. Finding value in these undesirable trees will help it pay its way off the land. This presentation provides information on potential uses of pinyon and juniper. The value of wood products made from these trees could range from $10/ton to more than $200/ ton. Unfortunately the higher valued products, such as lumber and poles, might be impossible to produce from these trees, given their growth patterns. Methods such as cutting wood apart and putting it back together (for example, finger jointing, laminates) greatly increase the wood?s value but at significant expense. Additional mastication can produce fibers useful for water pollution control and be the basis for composites. Composites can be made by blending various forms of wood (for example, dust, excelsior, chips) with recycled plastics or cement-based materials for a variety of products or rubbery material to make wheelchair accessible playgrounds. The advantages of keeping the wood round, if available in straight sections, could result in products such as guardrail posts or elaborate structures. Energy is the lowest valued use for wood; however, its demand exceeds supply so only economics limit the harvestable quantities. Considering the high cost of other forms of energy, the value of biomass markets could drive the value of the wood significantly higher. Given the importance of finding uses for pinyon and juniper, both expertise and some financing can be helpful.

Keywords: Pinon-juniper and juniper woodlands, ponderosa pine forests, ecology, management, restoration, southwestern United States

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Citation

    Knaebe, Mark. 2008. Uses of pinyon and juniper. In: Gottfried, Gerald J.; Shaw, John D.; Ford, Paulette L., compilers. 2008. Ecology, management, and restoration of pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine ecosystems: combined proceedings of the 2005 St. George, Utah and 2006 Albuquerque, New Mexico workshops. Proceedings RMRS-P-51. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 165-169.
Last Modified: January 11, 2012