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Living Memorials Project

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National Memorial Programs and Resources

  • Living Memorials and Greening Resources
    • Voices of September 11th
      http://www.voicesofsept11.org/dev/index.php
      VOICES of September 11th advocates and provides services for all those affected by September 11th; promotes public policy reform on prevention, preparedness and response to terrorism; and builds bridges between international communities changed by terrorism. Voices' 9/11 Living Memorial Project is an online interactive tribute commemorating the lives and preserving the stories of September 11, 2001. The Forest Service's Living Memorials Project research effort continues to grow in partnership with Voices of September 11th.
    • American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta
      http://www.aabga.org/
      This site contains resources for both its members and the public alike. The AABGA hosts an annual conference on botanical issues, with the 2003 conference entitled "Seeds of Revolution" that asks "How can public horticulture honor the past, embrace the present, and meet the new challenges of the future with spirit and passion?"
    • American Community Gardening Association
      http://www.communitygarden.org/
      The American Community Gardening Association (ACGA) is a national nonprofit membership organization of professionals, volunteers and supporters of community greening in urban and rural communities. The Association recognizes that community gardening improves the quality of life for people by providing a catalyst for neighborhood and community development, stimulating social interaction, encouraging self-reliance, beautifying neighborhoods, producing nutritious food, reducing family food budgets, conserving resources and creating opportunities for recreation, exercise, therapy and education. ACGA and its member organizations work to promote and support all aspects of community food and ornamental gardening, urban forestry, preservation and management of open space, and integrated planning and management of developing urban and rural lands.
    • American Horticultural Therapy Association
      http://www.ahta.org/
      The American Horticultural Therapy Association (AHTA) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote and advance the profession of Horticultural Therapy as a therapeutic intervention and rehabilitative medium. AHTA: disseminates information relating to the principals and practices of horticultural therapy; promotes research in horticultural therapy; establishes professional standards and accreditation in horticultural therapy; provides professional registration based on academic achievements, work and volunteer experience; offers members to individuals, students and institutions both nationally and internationally; and manages the annual Douglas J. Schwartz Greenhouse Grants Program.
    • Brooklyn Botanic Garden
      http://www.bbg.org/
      The mission of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden is to serve all the people in its community and throughout the world by: Displaying plants and practicing the high art of horticulture to provide a beautiful and hospitable setting for the delight and inspiration of the public. Engaging in research in plant sciences to expand human knowledge of plants, and disseminating the results to science professionals and the general public. Teaching children and adults about plants at a popular level, as well as making available instruction in the exacting skills required to grow plants and make beautiful gardens. Reaching out to help the people of all our diverse urban neighborhoods to enhance the quality of their surroundings and their daily lives through the cultivation and enjoyment of plants. Seeking actively to arouse public awareness of the fragility of our natural environment, both local and global, and providing information about ways to conserve and protect it.
    • Champion Tree Project
      http://www.championtrees.org/
      The Champion Tree Project is a non-profit, tax exempt charity dedicated to Protect, Propagate and Plant the gold medallists of our fields and forests. The Champion Tree Project was founded in 1996 in Michigan to preserve the biggest, best, tallest, strongest, and eldest representatives of Earth's largest living plants. The Project exists to protect these magnificent elder giants, and make sure their genetic wisdom, beauty and benevolence is available in the new millennium. We harvest seeds and buds to propagate into new saplings, which are planted in safe havens called Archival Living Libraries. They have provided Champion Trees for 9-11 plantings at the Pentagon and in Calvary Cemetery in Queens, NY.
    • Community Food Security Coalition
      http://www.foodsecurity.org/
      CFS approach believes strongly in the need to protect and promote local family-based agriculture as an alternative to a globalized food system. CFS strategies such as developing farmers' markets and community supported agriculture arrangements in low income communities benefit farmers and consumers by building non-traditional but natural partnerships. Family farmers benefit with an added source of income. Also, greater connection and understanding of local agriculture on the part of urban residents can facilitate regional and state policies that protect and promote local agriculture (such as farmland preservation). Community food security is as much about building community as it is about providing food for hungry people. CFS is about building partnerships between public and private sectors, between consumers and producers.
    • America the Beautiful Fund
      http://www.america-the-beautiful.org/
      In response to the tragedy of September 11th, America the Beautiful Fund provided grants of 100 - 1,000 packets of seed to plant Freedom Gardens all across America. We all want to help. We all want to do something to soothe the suffering of the family and friends of victims. We all want to take part in the healing of America. Plant a Freedom Garden to preserve the memory of those lost and as a peaceful reminder of the spirit that defines us as a nation. For 21 years we have distributed seed to grow food for the hungry, to teach environmental stewardship and to beautify America's streets, parks, schools and places of worship. Today, we call upon Americans to plant the "seeds that grow hope" in memorium. We ask you to seek a place in your community where those who have perished will be remembered always. A place to reflect on the events of September 11th, a place to celebrate our freedom and all the ways we express it.
    • Land Trust Alliance
      http://www.lta.org/
      Founded in 1982, the Land Trust Alliance is the national leader of the private land conservation movement, promoting voluntary land conservation across the country and providing resources, leadership and training to the nation's 1,200-plus nonprofit, grassroots land trusts, helping them to protect important open spaces. The Land Trust Alliance provides an array of programs, including direct grants to land trusts, training programs, answers to more than 3,000 inquiries for technical assistance each year, and one-on-one mentoring to help land trusts build organizations that are equipped to protect open space.
    • Memorial Trees Campaign and Patriot Trees for America
      http://www.americanforests.org/campaigns/memorial_trees/
      American Forests' Memorial Trees Campaign planted thousands of trees - one tree for every victim of the September 11 attack on America - in memorial groves in New York City; Washington, DC; Virginia and Pennsylvania. And, in addition, American Forests will plant memorial trees in communities across the United States. In the Patriot Trees for America Program, American Forests and participating IGA stores will work toward raising $675 per store to plant a 10-tree grove at a local park, school, or memorial in your hometown. American Forests will provide the trees-each the direct-offspring of a tree that witnessed an important moment in history or shaded a famous person. Area students, teachers or civic leaders may be invited to help choose the town's historic trees, and each grove will include a granite memorial marker and individual tree markers indicating species and historical lineage... They actively solicit interested communities and donor individuals.
    • Memorial Trees for WTC Victims
      Trees New York
      http://www.treesny.com/
      Trees New York has established a program to plant trees in memory of victims of the World Trade Center attacks. The plantings took place in spring and fall of 2002.
    • Memory Trees
      http://www.treemusketeers.org/hometown-urban_forestry.htm
      An innovative nonprofit in Southern California run for and by kids, Tree Musketeers has a number of tree planting programs and resources. As the name might suggest, trees are the primary focus of Tree Musketeers' environmental programs. They mobilize community volunteers tall and small for youth led events to plant and care for trees in a variety of projects. However, they have ongoing responsibility for two large areas of trees--Memory Row and Millennium Row. While standing as living tributes to special people or events, these trees are on the front line in the war against air, noise, and smell pollution. Memory Trees bring joy to the people who plant and care for them, and the community forest grows at no expense to the city.
    • National Arbor Day Foundation
      http://www.arborday.org/join/treecelebration.html
      The National Arbor Day Foundation offers plantings for special occasions and in memory of loved ones in national forests, which have been destroyed by fire, disease, or insects. They are currently planting in an area of Targhee National Forest. For each $10 contribution, ten trees will be planted and the individual's name placed in the park registry. Their Trees in Memory and Trees in Celebration programs plant lodgepole pine and Douglas fir trees in national forests which have been destroyed by fire, disease or insect. When you plant a tree in memory of a loved one, or to mark a special occasion, you contribute to a healthier environment and a brighter tomorrow for all creatures on Earth. A vibrant, beautiful tree benefits everyone in this and future generations and is perhaps the most fitting memorial of all. Planting a tree is an act of direct benefit to all. It can inspire energy, faith, devotion, and courage and carry forward the name of those memorialized in a living, vital way that grows grander with the years. As the trees grow and prosper, so does the meaning of your gift. Your trees will be silent sentinels, honorable monuments, and for decades to come, active participants in nature's plan.
    • OASIS: Open Accessible Space Information System
      http://www.oasisnyc.org/
      OASIS is a one-stop, interactive mapping resource to enhance the stewardship of open space for the benefit of all New York City residents. It is a community-based undertaking, local organizations design and test the first city wide, web-based, open space mapping resource for NYC. OASIS facilitates and focuses the delivery of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) resources to provide timely and accurate information about the green infrastructure of NYC.
    • Project Learning Tree
      http://www.plt.org/
      Project Learning Tree is an award winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12. PLT helps students learn HOW to think, not WHAT to think, about the environment. PLT, a program of the American Forest Foundation, is one of the most widely used environmental education programs in the United States and abroad. PLT materials bring the environment into the classroom and students into the environment. The program covers topics ranging from forests, wildlife, and water, to community planning, waste management and energy.
    • The TKF Foundation
      http://www.tkffdn.org
      The mission of the TKF Foundation is to create urban greenspace, sponsor public art, and champion urban agriculture with the goals of nurturing the human spirit and fostering a sense of community. TKF is dedicated to supporting "Open Spaces, Sacred Places"(R) and Community Greening in the Annapolis, Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. areas.
    • Commemorative Memorial Trees
      Friends of Trees
      http://www.friendsoftrees.org/commemorative_trees/index.php
      In times of sorrow and in times of joy, you can give a gift of life -- a tree. Planting a tree is a meaningful way to remember and celebrate the lives of the people we love. It's an enduring gift for the future, and one that helps the environment. A gift of trees is suitable for memorials, graduations, birthdays, anniversaries or any life passage or achievement you want to celebrate or honor. Through Friends of Trees, you can either have a tree planted in your yard or in the yard of the person you designate, or plant a tree or grove of trees during a special planting in an urban natural area.
    • Tribute Trees
      Earth Share
      http://www.earthshare.org/tributetrees_release.html
      Earth Share lead an effort to plant thousands of trees to create a living memorial honoring the victims of the September 11 attacks on America, and as a tribute to those who serve our country at home and abroad. The "Tribute Trees" initiative took place on Earth Day, April 22, 2002. Earth Share donated enough trees to honor each of the victims of September 11. The trees were planted in a memorial site designated by American Forests, an Earth Share founding member that has protected trees and forests since 1875. The program will coincide with a national campaign, headed by Earth Day Network, to devote Earth Day to promote the planting of trees around homes and neighborhoods as a way to save energy, clean the air and water, and protect wildlife. The memorial site will be chosen, in part, on the basis of where the trees are most needed for environmental restoration.
    • Trust for Public Lands
      http://www.tpl.org
      Land conservation is central to TPL's mission. Founded in 1972, the Trust for Public Land is the only national nonprofit working exclusively to protect land for human enjoyment and well-being. TPL helps conserve land for recreation and spiritual nourishment and to improve the health and quality of life of American communities. TPL's legal and real estate specialists work with landowners, government agencies, and community groups to: create urban parks, gardens, greenways, and riverways; build livable communities by setting aside open space in the path of growth; conserve land for watershed protection, scenic beauty, and close-to-home recreation; safeguard the character of communities by preserving historic landmarks and landscapes. TPL pioneers new ways to finance parks and open space; helps generate federal, state, and local conservation funding; and promotes the importance of public lands.
  • Education and Curriculum
    • Behind the Headlines Series
      http://www.teachingforchange.org/Sept11.htm
      Teaching for Change is a Washington, DC-based not-for-profit organization that promotes social and economic justice through public education. The September 11 sections provide lessons and links to web sites with teaching ideas and interactive lessons that: help students deal with the personal and collective emotions generated by the tragedy of September 11; prevent the racial profiling of Arabs, Arab-Americans and anyone from the Middle East or of the Muslim faith; place the current events in historic and contemporary context; get a deep understanding of critical concepts such as war, freedom, patriotism, justice and terrorism; and encourage students to think critically about the next steps.
    • Everything After: A 9.11 Youth Circle
      http://www.ea911.org/
      EA 9.11 is an online dialogue for high-school students to talk about any and all issues that have come up since September 11th. Teens around the United States have been traumatized by the after effects: stuff like the anthrax scare, the war in Afghanistan, racial intolerance at home. Young people need a space to set their own agenda and talk about the emotional impact of this new climate, and explore how these events continue to affect their lives. That's where the "Youth Circle" part comes in - this discussion is only for high school students between the ages of 14 and 19. It's based on the idea of a Small Group Dialogue, an online discussion technique designed to create an intimate space for high-quality conversations online. Unlike large bulletin boards, with hundreds or thousands of people posting at random but never really talking to each other, SGD assigns people to smaller groups, each with a limited number of members (between 25-45 active participants). Despite the fact that they begin as strangers, participants get to know and trust each other, making for a better conversation...
    • Facing History, Facing Ourselves
      http://www.facing.org/
      This group offers readings, resources, and events for classroom use. "Facing History and Ourselves is devoted to teaching about the dangers of indifference and the values of civility by helping schools confront the complexities of history in ways that promote critical and creative thinking about the challenges we face and the opportunities we have for positive change. The readings they provide are designed to deepen thinking and stimulate discussion about the horrific events of September 11, 2001 and the implications for our students, our lessons, our schools and our communities. They draw on both literature and history to encourage students' thinking about what is at stake in the world today."
    • History Responds Series
      http://www.nyhistory.org/historyresponds.html
      Sponsored and created by the New-York Historical Society.. "The goals of the History Responds Project are to: -- Collect, preserve, document, contextualize, and make accessible an archive of objects and documents from September 11 (and its aftermath) that will be available for study and contemplation at the Historical Society and on the Internet to researchers and, through interpretive programs, to the general public, students, and teachers. -- Open a public dialogue about the events and implications of September 11 through exhibitions, school programs, teacher workshops and public panels that offer historical perspectives on the World Trade Center attack and on how New Yorkers have faced and conquered extraordinary challenges in the past."
    • My Hero
      http://myhero.com/911/911.asp
      My Hero is a not for profit educational web project that celebrates the best of humanity. Our mission is to enlighten and inspire people of all ages with an ever-growing internet archive of hero stories from around the world. As we cope with this great tragedy, we know that sharing our stories of hope will help to provide all of us, especially children, with much-needed comfort and faith in the future.
    • The New York Times "Learning Network"
      http://archives.nytimes.com/learning/general/specials/terrorism/
      The site includes lesson plans, news snapshots, related articles, web sites, and letters to the editor, with specific resources aimed at students, teachers, and parents alike. By selecting the in-depth issues related to September 11, one can access this variety of learning materials (one example link is above). Materials were developed by the New York Times in partnership with The Bank Street College of Education in New York City.
    • Our America
      http://www.whatkidscando.org/America.html
      The tragedies of September 11, 2001 have spurred an outpouring of emotion, reflection, and action from young people across the nation. What Kids Can Do joins them in expressing their heartfelt sorrow at the lives lost, as well as their profound commitment to peace in our world. Here WKCD presents a small glimpse of that outpouring, knowing that while it cannot ease the sorrow, it may remind us of the idealism and energy of young people--and the importance of their voices and contributions. They offer, too, a list of resources for teachers, parents, other adults, and young people seeking to understand and build upon the complex lessons of these days.
    • Resources for Handling Trauma & Crises
      http://www.casel.org/
      CASEL is the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, which dedicates itself to working to establish social and emotional learning as an essential part of education from preschool through high school. They offer resources for responding to trauma and crises, including a new link to "Remember September 11" at http://neahin.org/programs/schoolsafety/ september11/
      materials/lessonhome.htm
      , which is a series of grade specific lesson plans and compiled other teacher resources for the September 11th anniversary from the NEA and NEA Health Education Network.
    • September 11th & After
      http://www.tolerance.org/teach/current/event.jsp?cid=262
      Whether teaching about current events, creating a welcoming environment for all students, or addressing the emotional needs of children and families in a time of war, educators are at the heart of September 11 response efforts. Teaching Tolerance offers a growing selection of resources that can help.
    • Talking With Kids About Terrorism & the Events of September 11
      http://www.talkingwithkids.org/twk-news-terror-dom-tips.htm
      This focused website offers features Dominic Capello, Director of the "Ten Talks Center" in New York and renowned expert on parent child communication, offers age-appropriate guidelines for how parents can talk with their kids about the recent tragedies. The guidelines include common questions children may ask and suggested answers parents can give.
    • They Explore Their World by Recreating It
      Contact: http://www.bankstreetcorner.com/explore_by_recreating.shtml
      After the collapse of the World Trade Center towers on September 11, 2001, children at Bank Street's School for Children used building blocks to express their feelings and regain a sense of security. Linda Levine, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Bank Street College, remarked, "When I walked into Lisa Edstrom's 5/6's classroom on October l8 and saw what her children had created in the block area, I was speechless. The video, made two days later, shows how those children - with their teacher's support - are trying to construct meaning out of recent events."
    • Unity in the Spirit of America
      Contact: http://www.usa.pointsoflight.org/default.html
      (202) 729-8000
      Sponsored by the Points of Light Foundation, The Unity in the Spirit of America Act, signed by President Bush on January 10 as an amendment to the Defense Appropriations Bill, called for the Points of Light Foundation--which partnered with the Volunteer Center National Network--to identify and organize at least 5,000 volunteer service projects across the United States by September 11, 2002, each in tribute to one of the victims of the September 11 attacks. This searchable website allows project leaders to enter information about their projects and to match those projects with victims' names or to request that a name be assigned by the Foundation. Potential volunteers can search for projects in their area. Edited post-project reports, along with reflections of the volunteers involved and project photos, will comprise the searchable scrapbook section of this site. Projects registered by September 11, and completed by November 30, 2002 can be considered official USA Initiative Service Projects.
    • We Remember: September 11
      http://www.pbs.org/whatson/press/sep02/remember.html
      PBS presents a variety of programming in response to the upcoming anniversary of September 11. They also archive all of their past programs related to the event at this site. This includes coverage of retaliation against Arab-Americans, the Heroes of September 11. The page http://www.pbs.org/americaresponds/ "America Responds" is a snapshot of PBS's coverage of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. This Web site was maintained in the months immediately following the attacks, and now serves as an archive of related resources, analysis and discussion from that moment in time.
  • Photographs and Sounds

    • After September 11: Images from Ground Zero
      Joel 1 Meyerowitz, Photographer
      Sponsored by Museum of the City of New York and the
      US Dept. of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
      Contact: http://www.911exhibit.state.gov/
      Within a few days of the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center in New York, the Museum of the City of New York engaged the noted photographer Joel Meyerowitz to create an archive of the destruction and recovery at Ground Zero and the immediate neighborhood. The 9/11 Photographic Archive will eventually number more than 5,000 images and will become part of the permanent collections of the Museum of the City of New York where it will be available for research, exhibition, and publication. Meyerowitz is working with a large format camera, which allows for the greatest detail and color reproduction. The Museum plans to mount an exhibition and publish an accompanying catalogue in 2004 as part of the opening of the new Museum of the City of New York at the Tweed Courthouse adjacent to New York City Hall, six blocks from the World Trade Center site.
    • Faces of Ground Zero
      Joe McNally, Photographer
      Contact: http://www.joemcnally.com/
      In the aftermath of the World Trade Center tragedy . . . I rummaged around in my head. How could I take the art and craft of photography and cobble it with 25 years of shooting experience in New York to give something back, to make some sort of connection with this crisis that had occurred in my home town.
    • Here is New York: A Democracy of Photographs
      Contact: http://www.hereisnewyork.org/
      Here is New York is not a conventional gallery show. It is something new, a show tailored to the nature of the event, and to the response it has elicited. The exhibition is subtitled "A Democracy of Photographs" because anyone and everyone who has taken pictures relating to the tragedy is invited to bring or ftp their images to the gallery, where they will be digitally scanned, archivally printed and displayed on the walls alongside the work of top photojournalists and other professional photographers. All of the prints which HERE IS NEW YORK displays will be sold to the public for $25, regardless of their provenance. The net proceeds will go to the Children's Aid Society WTC Relief Fund, for the benefit of the thousands of children who are among the greatest victims of this catastrophe.
    • Lost and Found Sound: Sonic Memorial
      National Public Radio
      Contact: http://www.sonicmemorial.org (212) 408-0300
      National Public Radio has set up a special Sonic Memorial phone line (202) 408-0300 for callers to describe their audio artifacts and tell their stories related to the life and history of the World Trade Center and it's neighborhood before, during and after September 11. The idea for this project grew out Lost and Found Sound's focus on archival audio and personal recordings as an important way of telling peoples' stories and chronicling everyday life and historic events. So far hundreds of New Yorkers and people across the country have called offering their recordings -- a dramatic, unprecedented audio archive of immediate, first-person accounts chronicling an historic event from almost every vantage point...
    • New York City Fire Museum
      Contact: www.nycfiremuseum.org/wtc/wtcpage.html
      Starting in September 2002, the New York City Fire Museum will display its September 11 memorial. Their site contains words of encouragement for firemen from around the world. They are also a partner in collecting, preserving, and cataloguing all the spontaneous monuments and words of encouragement that were placed all around the city to firemen across New York.
    • New York Voices
      PBS / Channel Thirteen
      Contact: http://www.thirteen.org/nyvoices/highlights/garden.html
      New York Voices is a new series about the city's recovery from September 11. Hosted by Rafael Pi Roman, the program comprises a series of snapshot features about New Yorkers who are playing a part in the rebuilding process. The show also deals with some of the most pressing and controversial issues the city faces in the aftermath of this great tragedy. In a patchwork of interviews and vignettes, New York Voices explores topics such as the rebuilding of the fire department, the renewed significance of the Empire State Building, New York's identity as an immigrant city, and the feelings and reactions of young people who are coming of age in the wake of this defining event.
    • Project September 11
      The Museum of the City of New York
      Contact: http://www.projectsept11@mcny.org/,
      A part of the Museum of the City of New York's response is available on the website, including: a brief history of the World Trade Center, with construction photographs donated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and Virtual Union Square, inspired by the spontaneous memorials created at Union Square Park, we invite contributions to this ever-growing virtual exhibition. The Museum has several physical exhibitions relating to September 11, 2001. Opening on the anniversary of the attack on the World Trade Center will be The Day Our World Changed, a juried exhibition of art by New York area children made in response to the events of 9/11.
  • Public Art
    • September 11 Memorial Portfolio
      This project ask each artist who is a member of one of the councils in the American Print Alliance or an independent subscriber to their journal, Contemporary Impressions, to take part. They welcome participation by artists from around the world, but you must be part of the Alliance. Artists are not assigned a person to commemorate -- use your imagination to celebrate a life. Any original work of art on/of paper will be accepted. Although we encourage printmaking techniques, we will also accept drawings, watercolors, hand-made paper, etc. Alliance director Carol Pulin writes, "This memorial portfolio is a way to help us comprehend the loss of so many individual lives... [With] thousands of people -- these artworks have to be different, individual images for the concept to be effective. As viewers walk along, they will stop to think about some here and there, be drawn to another down the row, just as they might be intrigued by various faces in a crowd. To convey the sheer number and the individuality of each life is the challenge.
    • Tribute in Light
      "On March 11th, the six-month anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks, two great beams of light rose from a site just north of Ground Zero into the night sky to honor those lost on September 11th and to celebrate the spirit of all the New Yorkers who have worked to rebuild and renew our City... Conceived in the aftermath of the September 11th tragedies, Tribute in Light is a temporary artistic gesture bringing together the vision and talent of numerous individuals who, shortly after the attacks, independently envisioned two beams of light rising from downtown New York. Finding support for their ideas, they joined forces in the spirit of the rescue and recovery effort downtown.
    • WTC Memorial Art Project (CA)
      This memorial is a collaborative mosaic intended as a gift of remembrance to the people of New York City. Artists from across the Bay Area were asked to contribute ten 12 inch flat squares in the medium and style of their choice, each square depicting one human form with figure halves on either side (when placed in a grid, new complete figures were created.) Participating local artists, from professional painters to school children, were united in their efforts to express their own emotional responses to the World Trade Center tragedy. Artists from Placerville to Berkeley to San Jose converged to execute the giant task of gluing and assembling the 231 contributed squares to create the 33 foot long mosaic. The impact of this piece is twofold - from across the room the mosaic communicates the enormity of this tragic event, but up close each square is a original piece with its own personal story.
    • WTC Memorial Quilt Project
      This is a national and international memorial project with over 18,000 quilt blocks that were donated and put together into the official WTC Memorial Quilt, as well as smaller charity quilts. All the pieces are signed by there creators and are in star shapes with red, white, and blue. The quilt will tour the country before finding a permanent home, possibly at the American Museum of Folk Art in New York City.
  • Community Mental Health
    • American Horticultural Therapy Association
      The American Horticultural Therapy Association (AHTA) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote and advance the profession of Horticultural Therapy as a therapeutic intervention and rehabilitative medium. AHTA: disseminates information relating to the principals and practices of horticultural therapy; promotes research in horticultural therapy; establishes professional standards and accreditation in horticultural therapy; provides professional registration based on academic achievements, work and volunteer experience; offers members to individuals, students and institutions both nationally and internationally; and manages the annual Douglas J. Schwartz Greenhouse Grants Program.
    • Survivors Art Foundation
      Dedicated to encourage healing through the arts, Survivors Art Foundation is a 501(C)(3) non-profit organization committed to empowering trauma survivors with effective expressive outlets via internet art gallery, outreach programs, national exhibitions, publications and development of employment skills. Their goals are to provide entertainment, education, and exposure to the arts. They endeavor to raise public awareness through the arts: eradicating abuse and creating an atmosphere of acceptance for survivors with disabilities. Mainstreaming trauma survivors with physical and mental disabilities into the arts.
    • National Artists for Mental Health, Inc
      National Artists for Mental Health, Inc. is a recipient-driven organization that utilizes whole self-healing approaches to develop, foster, and promote self-help recovery and independence for all recipients of mental health. National Artists for Mental Health, Inc. utilizes approaches that focus on artistic expression and time-honored holistic practices. These approaches promote a self-help initiative in recovery and incorporate a mind/body/spirit connection for true wholeness and wellness. Their approach is divided into two categories: expressive arts and holistic health.
    • Project Liberty
      Project Liberty is a program that provides free crisis counseling services to persons, families and groups most affected by the September 11 World Trade Center disaster. They offer services in the five boroughs of New York City and in Delaware, Dutchess, Nassau, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Suffolk, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester counties. Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Center for Mental Health Services, Project Liberty is being administered by the New York State Office of Mental Health. It is a collaborative effort of the Office of Mental Health, local governments and provider agencies. Project Liberty offers one-to-one or group sessions wherever you wish to have them -- in your home, school, business, office, or church. They reach out to disaster survivors in their own environments, to provide face-to-face crisis counseling and education services.
  • Asbestos and 9/11

 

New York Area Resources

  • 9-11
    • Citizens Committee for New York City
      After September 11th, the Citizens Committee created a "What Can I Do?" public information campaign to foster and encourage volunteerism in New York City's neighborhoods. TV public service announcements direct viewers to the Citizens Committee for information on how to volunteer locally. A September 11 Project Database and Neighborhood Action Guides offer "how-to" advice on a number of neighborhood projects. They also created September 11 "Remember and Renew" grants to support continuing efforts to provide support and counseling, to help New York City's volunteer neighborhood, school-based and faith-based support efforts.
    • The Daffodil Project
      In the aftermath of the World Trade Center attack, thousands of New Yorkers sought a way to commemorate those lost while contributing to the city's emotional and physical rebirth. The City of New York/Parks & Recreation, Partnerships for Parks, the City Parks Foundation, the Parks Council, the Central Park Conservancy, the Coalition for New York City Parks and hundreds of park groups organized a living tribute to those who died in the September 11 attack. We took part in the planning of a citywide initiative, a way for ordinary citizens and those directly affected by the attacks, to help to create a permanent, recurring memorial and sense of renewal for the city. Thanks to New Yorkers, and others who traveled to the city to help, New York City planted over one million daffodil bulbs in parks, along highways, in community gardens, and in front of fire houses, police stations, libraries, and schools around the city. Over one million bulbs will bloom into "fields of gold" next spring and for all the springs to follow, lifting the spirits of New York's citizens and visitors.
    • Here is New York: A Democracy of Photographs
      Here is New York is not a conventional gallery show. It is something new, a show tailored to the nature of the event, and to the response it has elicited. The exhibition is subtitled "A Democracy of Photographs" because anyone and everyone who has taken pictures relating to the tragedy is invited to bring or ftp their images to the gallery, where they will be digitally scanned, archivally printed and displayed on the walls alongside the work of top photojournalists and other professional photographers. All of the prints which HERE IS NEW YORK displays will be sold to the public for $25, regardless of their provenance. The net proceeds will go to the Children's Aid Society WTC Relief Fund, for the benefit of the thousands of children who are among the greatest victims of this catastrophe.
    • NYC
      NYC RECOVERS is an alliance of organizations who have incorporated social and emotional recovery into their ongoing agendas in the aftermath of September 11th. The organizations who have partnered with us are diverse, spread throughout the city and the region. They have partnered with these groups in a number of activities that promote strong communities, and building bridges across distinct groups that might not have worked together otherwise. Currently, NYC RECOVERS is engaging organizations in a Wellness campaign for September 2002. This campaign invites organizations of all kinds throughout the city to hold healing activities before and after the anniversary of 9/11, which include: yoga, crafts, song and dance, writing, gardening and a variety of other activities that allow people to nurture themselves. We believe this effort can help individuals continue to heal rather than become retraumatized at the anniversary of this tragic event. The Year of Recovery has been the guiding concept for NYC RECOVERS. We realize that individuals and groups have been moving through a recovery process and need different activities to help them through different stages and seasons.
    • Project Liberty
      Project Liberty is a program that provides free crisis counseling services to persons, families and groups most affected by the September 11 World Trade Center disaster. They offer services in the five boroughs of New York City and in Delaware, Dutchess, Nassau, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Suffolk, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester counties. Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Center for Mental Health Services, Project Liberty is being administered by the New York State Office of Mental Health. It is a collaborative effort of the Office of Mental Health, local governments and provider agencies. Project Liberty offers one-to-one or group sessions wherever you wish to have them -- in your home, school, business, office, or church. They reach out to disaster survivors in their own environments, to provide face-to-face crisis counseling and education services.
  • Greening
    • Brooklyn Botanic Garden
      The mission of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden is to serve all the people in its community and throughout the world by: Displaying plants and practicing the high art of horticulture to provide a beautiful and hospitable setting for the delight and inspiration of the public. Engaging in research in plant sciences to expand human knowledge of plants, and disseminating the results to science professionals and the general public. Teaching children and adults about plants at a popular level, as well as making available instruction in the exacting skills required to grow plants and make beautiful gardens. Reaching out to help the people of all our diverse urban neighborhoods to enhance the quality of their surroundings and their daily lives through the cultivation and enjoyment of plants. Seeking actively to arouse public awareness of the fragility of our natural environment, both local and global, and providing information about ways to conserve and protect it.
    • Council on the Environment of New York City
      The Council on the Environment of New York City (CENYC), founded in 1970, is a privately funded citizens' organization in the Office of the Mayor. CENYC promotes environmental awareness and solutions to environmental problems. Our programs: Open Space Greening; Greenmarket; Environmental Education and Waste Prevention and Recycling and other special projects make a positive and discernible difference in the lives and communities of New Yorkers -- from waste prevention by office employees, to water conservation and park cleanups by students, Greenmarkets in over 20 neighborhoods, and neighborhood open spaces resplendent with trees and flowers. CENYC reaches out to the public with information on noise pollution and abatement, alternatives to hazardous household products, and other issues.
    • The Daffodil Project
      In the aftermath of the World Trade Center attack, thousands of New Yorkers sought a way to commemorate those lost while contributing to the city's emotional and physical rebirth. The City of New York/Parks & Recreation, Partnerships for Parks, the City Parks Foundation, the Parks Council, the Central Park Conservancy, the Coalition for New York City Parks and hundreds of park groups organized a living tribute to those who died in the September 11 attack. We took part in the planning of a citywide initiative, a way for ordinary citizens and those directly affected by the attacks, to help to create a permanent, recurring memorial and sense of renewal for the city. Thanks to New Yorkers, and others who traveled to the city to help, New York City planted over one million daffodil bulbs in parks, along highways, in community gardens, and in front of fire houses, police stations, libraries, and schools around the city. Over one million bulbs will bloom into "fields of gold" next spring and for all the springs to follow, lifting the spirits of New York's citizens and visitors.
    • GreenThumb
      New York City Department of Parks and Recreation
      The largest community gardening program in the country, GreenThumb is proud to support community gardens in New York City. We have over 650 member gardens serving 20,000 city residents. Since 1978 we've been committed to providing support to help strengthen gardens, strengthen gardener skills, and strengthen communities. GreenThumb's services take the form of materials, grants, and technical assistance, including educational workshops. The majority of GreenThumb gardens were derelict vacant lots renovated by volunteers. These community gardens, now managed by neighborhood residents, provide important green space, thus improving air quality, bio-diversity, and the well-being of residents. But gardens aren't just pretty spaces- they're also important community resources. All GreenThumb gardens offer public programs that improve quality of life for residents of all ages. So gardens may offer educational workshops, children's programs, food pantries, or community-building events like block parties. Active garden sites create a stable force in the community that serve as anchors for area re-development initiatives, while making the city safer, healthier, and cleaner.
    • Green Guerillas
      Since 1973 greenguerillas' has helped thousands of people realize their dreams of turning vacant rubble-strewn lots into vibrant community gardens. Each year they work with hundreds of grassroots groups throughout New York City to strengthen underserved neighborhoods through community gardening. With their help, people grow food, plant flowers, educate youth, paint colorful murals and preserve their gardens as vital community centers for future generations. Through a unique mix of outreach, organizing and advocacy, Green Guerillas provides a comprehensive array of services to more than 300 grassroots groups each year. Their staff works to: preserve community gardens for future generations; nurture the next generation of community garden leaders; help gardeners grow food and fight hunger; provide ongoing support to community gardens citywide; create and sustain a strong network of community garden supporters.
    • Memorial Tree Program -- Tree Keepers
      The New Jersey Tree Foundation is a statewide, non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion, enhancement and development of urban and community forestry activities in New Jersey through education, partnerships, volunteerism, community outreach and grants. The Tree Foundation is committed to providing exceptional forestry programs, services and opportunities to New Jersey's cities and towns. Participants of the TreeKeepers Training may receive both classroom and hands-on instruction in the planting and maintenance of trees. Each TreeKeeper who successfully completes the Training will receive one pair of hand pruners, and each group will receive one pole pruner. The NJ Tree Foundation will also apply for two Continuing Education Credits for each TreeKeepers Training.
    • Memorial Trees for WTC Victims
      Trees New York
      Trees New York has established a program to plant trees in memory of victims of the World Trade Center attacks. The plantings will take place in the spring and fall of 2002. If you have lost a loved one and would like a tree planted in his or her memory, please write to :Trees New York, 51 Chambers St., Suite 1412A, New York, N.Y. 10007, or send an email (treesny@treesny.com with your name, address, phone number, the name of the individual the tree is memorializing, and the borough in which you'd like the tree planted. The number of trees are limited, so please write to us as soon as you can. We will contact you in late winter/early spring 2002 as the program moves forward. A tree serves as a wonderful living legacy.
    • New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
      The Department of Environmental Protection is committed to providing a high quality of life for the residents of New Jersey. The DEP's mission is to assist the residents of New Jersey in preserving, sustaining, protecting and enhancing the environment to ensure the integration of high environmental quality, public health and economic vitality. We will accomplish our mission in partnership with the general public, business, environmental community and all levels of government.
    • New Jersey Community Forestry Program
      The New Jersey Community Forestry program insures more livable communities through the care and management of trees. Neglect and urban stress limit the life span of the average dowtown tree to only 10 years. With proper care, trees live longer, look better, and increase in value as they age. Without care, they decline in health and value and become liabilities. Trees deserve to be managed with the same skill and diligence as any other community assets. "Making towns more livable through the care and maintenance of trees"
    • New York American Patriot Garden Program
      The Lower Hudson-Long Island Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. is proud to have Governor George E. Pataki's support of the New York State American Patriot Gardens project. Trees have always been a symbol of strength, a symbol of growth and from the beginning of American history, a resource that built our nation. Each tree planting project will be dedicated on September 11, 2002 with a uniform plaque, which forever commemorates these open spaces as official Patriot plantings.
    • The New York Botanical Garden
      The New York Botanical Garden is one of the foremost public gardens in America and a National Historic Landmark. It has some of the most beautiful natural terrain of any botanical garden in the world, with dramatic rock outcroppings, a river and cascading waterfall, undulating hills, wetlands, ponds and 50 acres of historic, uncut forest. Within this grand 250-acre setting in the north Bronx, many gardens and special plantings offer stunning seasonal displays, ranging from rainbows of tulips and azaleas in spring to the rich tapestries of fall foliage. The New York Botanical Garden offers a tranquil retreat from New York City and an outdoor classroom for people of all ages to learn about the world of plants. They also hold events, education, and trainings. One of the principal goals of the botanical science program of The New York Botanical Garden is to disseminate research results and information to the scientific community and to the general public through the publication of scholarly journals, monographs, and books. Communication is as crucial to the Garden's mission as research. New information serves no purpose if it fails to reach other scientists and policymakers who can translate that information into action.
    • The New York Horticultural Society
      Founded in 1900, The Horticultural Society of New York is dedicated to improving the quality of life in New York through horticulture. HSNY's community outreach programs consist of their Apple Seed, GreenBranches, GreenHouse and GreenTeam programs. Behind each outreach program is the powerful message that someone cares and that together people have the power to change the world in which we live. In this way, people come to understand the value of individual responsibility and teamwork. Involvement in our outreach programs and the sense of accomplishment developed from hard work forges a sense of ownership in the community among neighborhood children, adults and ex-offenders. Racial, ethnic and economic bridges are built by working side by side on community projects. The end result is a beautiful garden that belongs to the community and is an on-going visual reminder of the communities' joint effort.
    • The New York City Housing Authority Children's Gardening Program
      The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) provides decent and affordable housing in a safe and secure living environment for low- and moderate-income residents throughout the five boroughs. While maintaining their building stock, they work to enhance the quality of life at NYCHA by offering our residents social services that give them opportunities to participate in a multitude of community, educational and recreational programs, as well as job readiness and training initiatives. The Garden Program is a competitive program that inspires residents to become more involved in the beautification of their communities. In 1995, a new category for the Tenant Garden competition was created to directly involve children in a summer of gardening; under the "Children's Theme Gardens" category, gardens must be developed around a stated theme (for example, "Butterfly Garden" or Alphabet Garden") in order to encourage imagination, originality, and better results.
    • The New York Restoration Project
      New York Restoration Project (NYRP) carries out founder Bette Midler's dream of a cleaner, more beautiful New York. NYRP restores, develops, and revitalizes underserved parks, community gardens, and open space in New York City. They invest in the communities we serve by providing on-going maintenance and programs because they believe that every individual has the right to a beautiful neighborhood and the responsibility for contributing to its care.
    • OASIS: Open Accessible Space Information System
      OASIS is a one-stop, interactive mapping resource to enhance the stewardship of open space for the benefit of all New York City residents. It is a community-based undertaking, local organizations design and test the first city wide, web-based, open space mapping resource for NYC. OASIS facilitates and focuses the delivery of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) resources to provide timely and accurate information about the green infrastructure of NYC.
    • Partnerships for Parks
      A joint partnership of the City Parks Foundation and the City of New York/Parks and Recreation, Partnership for Parks' mission is to encourage community support for and involvement in NYC's Parks. We help to strengthen, support and start neighborhood park groups. Their mission is to spur more community support for and involvement in New York City's parks. They work to strengthen, support and start neighborhood park groups; link them together so that they can learn from each other and be stronger collectively; and promote parks in general so that people will be more likely to join in efforts to restore and preserve them.
    • Queens Botanical Garden
      The Queens Botanical Garden is 39 acres of unsurpassed beauty and tranquility in the heart of New York City's largest borough. Located at the northeast corner of Flushing Meadows Corona Park, the Garden is an integral and verdant part of a corridor of green space that traverses the county for several miles. Each year, more than 320,000 people who visit the Queens Botanical Garden experience nature's beauty along shaded and sun-drenched paths, while enjoying seasonal displays of tulips, roses, and annuals, as well as an outstanding collection of plants and trees exhibited in five teaching collections and six backyard demonstration gardens. The Garden serves the multi-ethnic populations of Queens with a wide array of enjoyable educational programming, and has become a gathering place where, in the spirit of New York's two World's Fairs, there is something for everyone.
    • Resilient Communities
      Cornell Cooperative Extension Service
      In the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks, New Yorkers looked for ways to contribute to the city's rebirth. Last November, Cornell University Cooperative Extension New York City's 4-H Youth Council participated in the memorial planting of 25,000 daffodil bulbs. The Daffodils, in the spring of 2002, bloomed to form the image of the World Trade Center. Unfortunately, because of the lack of rain, the image formed by the daffodils could not be sustained. On Saturday, September 7, 2002 the 4-H Youth Council returned to repair the garden in time to remember the year since the attack on the World Trade Center.
    • Sunflower Project NYC:
      The Sunflower Project is a living memorial planting project to remember the people lost on September 11th; to honor their families; to thank all the people who contributed to the recovery; to make our world better, one patch at a time. The idea is to create sunflower memorial patches everywhere-- to remember and honor life with living symbols of renewal and hope. An official September 11th memorial in NYC will not be approved or in place this coming September. We felt something should be in place --not just at Ground Zero, but everywhere. Sunflowers are easy to grow, and brighten up the most forgotten, neglected places. Like New Yorkers, they are tenacious, and can survive and thrive in adverse conditions. They improve the places they grow, attracting birds and butterflies while cleaning the air. Sunflowers make sense as one tall way to remember life and make it a bit better. It's hard not to look up in their presence.
    • Take a Walk New York
      NYC Department of Health and Neighborhood Open Space Coalition
      Do you love New York City? Would you like to explore different New York City neighborhoods and be healthier? Well, if that's the case then Take A Walk, New York! is for you. Take a Walk New, York! a program of free, guided urban adventure walks taking place on weekends in all five boroughs is about to begin its second year. The program is a wonderful way for New Yorkers to walk for health while exploring their city. Take a Walk, New York! is designed and implemented by the Neighborhood Open Space Coalition, and is a component of the New York City Department of Health's Listen to Your Heart Campaign. The Take a Walk, New York! program is open to everyone.
  • Rebuilding Lower Manhattan
    • Civic Alliance
      Regional Plan Association
      In a partnership with New School University, New York University and Pratt Institute, Regional Plan Association has convened The Civic Alliance to Rebuild Downtown New York to develop strategies for the redevelopment of Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center. The Civic Alliance is a coalition of more than 75 business, community and environmental groups representing a cross-section of New York and the Region that is providing a broad "umbrella" for civic planning and advocacy efforts in support of the rebuilding of Downtown New York. They were the organizers behind the 5,000 person public forum, "Listening to the City."
    • Imagine New York
      Municipal Art Society
      Imagine NY is working to establish a meaningful process to bring together individuals in neighborhoods throughout the region to share their ideas and visions for rebuilding downtown and memorializing the World Trade Center tragedy and responding to the impact of September 11 on the metropolitan area. Imagine New York: Giving Voice to the People's Visions, is a series of "visioning" workshops, that took place in the spring of 2002, which actively solicited the public's ideas for the future of the site, the city, and our communities.
    • New York New Visions
      A coalition for rebuilding lower Manhattan
      New York New Visions is a coalition of 20 architecture, planning, and design organizations that came together immediately following the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. This group, representing over 30,000 individuals, has pooled the collective resources and technical expertise of over 350 professionals and civic group leaders in a pro-bono effort to address the issues surrounding the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan. The coalition made preliminary recommendations for infrastructure, planning, and design that can help make Lower Manhattan more comfortable and appealing for workers, residents, and tourists. They hope not to replace the broader public discourse, but to inform the large-scale economic and real estate development decisions to be made in the coming months.
    • Rebuild Downtown Our Town
      The R.Dot coalition is comprised of Lower Manhattan residents, businesses, community and business associations, artists, colleges, professionals, architects, designers together with public officials and appointees. R.Dot's vision is to help create in Lower Manhattan a 21st century living, working, sustainable environment that symbolizes the American spirit and its humanistic values; honors our dead; reflects our modern cultural, technological, economic and social thought, our global financial and economic leadership, and a multicultural society. The coalition's objective is to support an imaginative, sustainable design that creates the possibility of a diverse, inclusive, 24-hour residential and business community. The built design should attract and serve people who provide the intellectual, entrepreneurial, creative and technological capabilities that empower New York City's economy and the richness of its multi-cultural life. R.Dot strongly supports the design of a fitting memorial to all those who lost their lives and those who have been irrevocably changed by the tragedy on September 11.
  • Asbestos and 9/11

Washington DC Area Resources

  • Arlington County Anniversary Tree Planting Initiative
    Arlington County, Virginia
    Together with American Forests, Arlington County will make available at least 368 mature 6-foot to 10-foot trees for the anniversary to be planted on private and public property in the County. The announcement on March 19th is intended to localize a ceremony held Jan. 31st in the District of Columbia announcing the initiative that includes commemorating victims and heroes in both Pennsylvania and New York as well as Virginia.
  • Washington DC September 11 Memorial Groves
    The Memorial Tree Groves Project will pay lasting tribute to the tragic events of September 11, 2001 with one central and eight ward-based neighborhood memorial tree groves, as well as several individual tree plantings honoring those whose lives were lost. The project will give residents and visitors alike a place to reflect on this difficult time in our nation's history. The Executive Office of the Mayor will lead the effort in cooperation with a host of public and private partners. The Kingman Island central site is a Forest Service Living Memorials Project partner.
  • The TKF Foundation
    The mission of the TKF Foundation is to create urban greenspace, sponsor public art, and champion urban agriculture with the goals of nurturing the human spirit and fostering a sense of community. TKF is dedicated to supporting "Open Spaces, Sacred Places"® and Community Greening in the Annapolis, Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. areas.
  • Green Spaces for D.C.
    Green Spaces for DC believes that great public spaces are the hallmark of great cities-places where people can gather for rest, recreation and the enjoyment of the outdoors. Green Spaces for DC is helping to make the nation’s capitol a truly great city by creating, protecting and improving public parks and other open spaces by: Undertaking and advancing park restoration projects through private fund raising and the development of public-private partnerships; promoting best practices to improve the quality of green space in the District of Columbia; and building a District-wide consensus for urban greening through advocacy and community organizing.

Southwest Pennsylvania Area Resources

  • Flight 93 Memorial, Somerset County
    This site has been commissioned by the Somerset County Commissioners, Somerset, PA with the purpose of providing one place for current news and factual information about Flight 93 and the memorial effort.
  • Flight 93 National Memorial
    This site relates all of the information on the planning of the Flight 93 memorial. On September 24, 2002, Congress passed the Flight 93 National Memorial Act. The act created a new national park unit to "commemorate the passengers and crew of Flight 93, who, on September 11, 2001, courageously gave their lives, therby thwarting an attack on our Nation's Capital."
  • National Parks Service, Flight 93 National Memorial