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 George D. Aiken Forestry Sciences Lab                        705 Spear Street  South Burlington, Vermont 05403

(802) 951-6771

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LIVELIHOOD DIVERSITY:

Non-Timber Forest Products in Michiganís Upper Peninsula


Marla R. Emery, PH.D.

 

USDA Forest Service

Northeastern Research Station


What is the role of non-timber forest products in household livelihoods of Michiganís Upper Peninsula?

A year of fieldwork in Michiganís Upper Peninsula revealed that non-timber forest products (NTFP) such as boughs, mushrooms, bark, and berries continue to be an important part of many peopleís livelihoods in this heavily forested northern region. Interviews with gatherers identified 138 products from more than 80 botanical species. These products have medicinal, food, floral, and ceremonial uses. They provide for gatherer householdsí needs through both nonmarket and market means. Most gatherers have multigenerational ties to the regionís forests and acquired the ecological knowledge and skills needed for successful gathering from older family members. The role of NTFP as a livelihood strategy varies over time, becoming most important when formal employment and income are not adequate to meet household needs.

Visit the following links to learn more:


This site is based on: Emery, Marla R. 1998. Invisible Livelihoods: Non-Timber Forest Products in  Michigan's Upper Peninsula. New Brunswick: Rutgers University.

A complete copy may be ordered from UMI:http://wwwlib.umi.com/dxweb/search  (order #  9915435)


Special thanks to the Hiawatha National Forest and the Northern Global Change Program for their co-sponsorship of the research.

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