Land acquisition to preserve clean water, improve public access and protect aquatic, wildlife habitat.

Land acquisition to preserve clean water, improve public access and protect aquatic, wildlife habitat.



More than 1,500 feet of undeveloped shoreline along Ten Mile Lake is now part of the Chippewa National Forest.

MILWAUKEE

– Recently, 17.86 acres of land in Flower Pot Bay on Ten Mile Lake was formally acquired by the Chippewa National Forest. This pristine property, including over 1,500 feet of undeveloped shoreline along Ten Mile Lake, is now part of the CNF, successfully concluding a 10-year campaign to preserve the much-beloved land. Securing this ownership will preserve clean water within Ten Mile Lake, a direct benefit to maintaining healthy forests and ecosystems. The Flower Pot Bay parcel will provide improved public access and offer additional dispersed recreation opportunities, helping to distribute use and improve visitor experience.

The collaboration began in 2007, when Leech Lake Area Watershed Foundation approached the Forest Service regarding interest in acquiring the property from them. The CNF expressed interest but informed the foundation the acquisition could take years to fund. The foundation agreed to hold the property until the CNF could secure the funding.

This parcel is one of the last remaining non-public undeveloped parcels with significant riparian frontage within the CNF. In addition, Ten Mile Lake is designated as one of 24 Sentinel Lakes and due to its high water quality, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources listed the lake as a Cisco Refuge Lake, meaning the lake and its watershed is of high long-term conservation priority. The parcel also offers bald eagle habitat, protection of high-quality wetlands and protection for aquatic and wildlife habitat.

“For our conservation organization, working in partnerships is critical to our success and we are grateful to the U.S. Forest Service commitment to this project and to this region as we work to protect the amazing lakes and water resources in this region,” said Lindsey Ketchel, the executive director at the Leech Lake Area Watershed Foundation.