Deliver Benefits to the Public

Pineview Loop pathway connects Huntsille and Eden, Utah


Representatives from the Forest Service, Weber Pathways, Weber County, Huntsville, and Eden, Utah at a ribbon cutting ceremony at Pelican Beach at Pineview Reservoir on June 21, 2017 to celebrate the completion of a major portion of the Pineview Loop Pathway (PLP) that connects Huntsville Town to Eden. The PLP is a non-motorized trail that will encircle Pineview Reservoir in the Upper Ogden Valley of Weber County, Utah, on the Uinta-Wasatch Cache National Forest. Forest. Service photo by Charity Parks.

Weber Pathways hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony at Pelican Beach at Pineview Reservoir on June 21, 2017 to celebrate the completion of a major portion of the Pineview Loop Pathway that connects Huntsville Town to Eden. The PLP is a non-motorized trail that will encircle Pineview Reservoir in the Upper Ogden Valley of Weber County, Utah, on the Uinta-Wasatch Cache National Forest. Once complete, the trail will be approximately 16 miles in length and provide a safe trail around the Pineview Reservoir while providing a way for residents and visitor to walk or bike around the community.


Pineview Loop Pathway (PLP). The pathway connects Huntsille and Eden, Utah. The PLP is a non-motorized trail that will encircle Pineview Reservoir in the Upper Ogden Valley of Weber County, Utah, on the Uinta-Wasatch Cache National Forest. Forest. Service photo by Charity Parks.

The newest section of pathway connects Spring Creek trailhead to Pelican Beach trailhead, thereby making it possible to bike, run or walk from Huntsville Town to Eden without being on the highway. Already, thousands of Ogden Valley and other Weber County residents use the pathway each week to bike, walk, and run. Snowcrest Junior High and Valley Elementary students use the pathway to safely bike and walk to school. With this final connection from Eden to Huntsville, more residents use the pathway for active transportation to shop, go to the library, go to restaurants, and visit friends. Additionally, there is a wealth of camping, picnicking, boating, fishing, and other recreation spots along the trail.

The design and construction of the PLP was relatively simple in design and construction. As the work progressed it became increasingly more challenging and expensive. The last two miles includes wetland areas, a 55’ bridge, concrete curbing, a parking area, and 1,000 feet of raised pathway along the beach. According to Alan Wheelwright, Weber Pathway’s Board member and PLP project chair, “This section of completed pathway is extremely valuable to the community providing a safe path for the many users and a beautiful amenity of our citizens.”