faces of the forest

Meet Jim Guldin

Meet Jim Guldin, supervisory ecologist and project leader at the Southern Research Station in Hot Springs, Ark., and his older brother Richard Guldin, director of Quantitative Sciences for Research and Development in Rosslyn, Va. While the U.S.

Meet Richard Guldin

Meet Richard Guldin, director of Quantitative Sciences for Research and Development in Rosslyn, Va., and his younger brother Jim Guldin, supervisory ecologist and project leader at the Southern Research Station in Hot Springs, Ark. While the U.S. Forest Service is not a family business, it is not unheard of that more than one member of a family dedicates themselves to the agency. It’s a bit more unusual, however, that two brothers wound up on a somewhat parallel path that brought them to similar, yet disparate professions in the agency.

Meet Jim Oftedal



Jim is a leader in the agency, a mentor in the community, and a community organizer. He credits his success because of his creative grassroots approach and his continued desire to building strong relationships in diverse communities.

Meet James Redhouse Jr.

In 2000, a young James Redhouse looked around at his high school buddies and saw they were joining the Utah National Guard, so he decided to do the same thing. But at 17 he needed his parent’s permission, which his mother somewhat reluctantly gave. One year later, in the early fall of 2001, the world changed. Eventually, Redhouse was sent to Iraq, where he suffered wounds that would send him home and earn him a Purple Heart. Today, he’s still a member of the National Guard and, when not training, works on the Dixie National Forest.

Meet David Ferrell

David Ferrell is the oldest of five children who, during his freshman year, put college on hold to help his ailing mother. A mentor, Charles Minor, helped him during this time. David joined the Job Corps, won a college scholarship, became a college football star and attracted the attention of an NFL team. After college he returned to the Job Corps, this time helping to run camps and, in many cases, became the catalyst to help improve centers. A chance meeting took him in yet another direction, this time as a Forest Service law enforcement officer.

Meet Nan Christianson

Nan Christianson started her new job as Assistant Station Director for Communications at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colo.,in March 2010.  She has had some pretty unusual opportunities, which she considers gifts. 

 

What’s the one thing about you few people know?