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The Build or Lease Analysis will help you determine whether it will be more cost effective to lease or construct your new facility.

  • Build or Lease Topics

    Photo of a leased office building.

    Walden leased office space.

    What Needs to be Done Before Deciding Whether to Build or Lease:

    1. Complete or update your Facility Master Plan. Need help? Visit the FMP Toolbox.

    2. Complete a Preliminary Project Analysis (PPA) and identify alternatives. Need help? Visit the PPA section.

    Why Do We Need To Use OMB Circular A-94?

    When Do I Need To Use A-94? For a quick way to determine the financial alternatives, check out the "Users Guide to the Facility Lease, Purchase, or Construction Spreadsheet".

    OPTION 1: Leasing a Building

    What written documentation is needed to justify leasing?

    Who Has The Responsibility When Evaluating a Leased Facility?

    How Do I Coordinate For a Leased Facility?

    What Considerations Need To Be Made When Looking For a Leased  Facility?

    What Are the Technical Requirements That Need To Be Met?

    What Is the Lease Process Before Occupancy?

    OPTION 2: Building a New Facility

    Who Bears the Responsibility When Constructing a New Facility?

    How to Accomplish the Design and Construction Process

    Developing a Project Prospectus

    What Should the Design Process Consist Of?

    References and Examples

    References/Links

    Example Of High Desert Interagency Partnership Lease-Purchase Analysis


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  • OMB A-94 Part 13b.Required Justification for Leases

    All leases of capital assets must be justified by one of the three following criteria:

    1. A lease represents a major acquisition if:

      1. The acquisition represents a separate line-item in the agency's budget.

      2. The agency or OMB determines the acquisition is a major one.

      3. The group of assets exceeds $500 million.

    2. By conducting periodic lease analysis of recurrent decisions to lease similar assets used for the same general purpose. Such analysis would apply to the entire class of assets.

    3. By adopting a formal policy for smaller leases and submitting that policy to the OMB for approval. Before adopting the policy, it should be determined that:


      1. The leases in question would generally result in substantial savings to the Government that could not be realized on a purchase.

      2. The leases are so small or short-term as to make separate lease analysis impractical; and

      3. Leases of different types are scored consistently with the instructions in Appendix A and Appendix B of Circular A-11.

    In addition, the lease must not be a Capital Lease.

    1. Per the November 5, 2007 letter from the Forest Service Chief Financial Officer, Agency policy is to enter only into operating leases.

    2. To determine whether a lease is a capital lease or an operating lease, see Forest Service Handbook 6509.19, chapter 10, section 17–Leased Assets, and exhibit 01–Capital/Operating Lease Determination Worksheet. Per the July 8, 2008 letter from the Director of Acquisition Management and the Director of ASC Budget & Finance, DO NOT USE exhibit 01-Capital/Operating Lease Determination Worksheet.

    Whenever a Federal agency needs to acquire the use of a capital asset, it should be the least expensive for the Government.

  • FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 31.04

    1. Regional Foresters, Station Directors are responsible for determining local guidelines, practices, and procedures for coordinating the development of leased facilities.
    2. Station Directors and Director of International Institute of Tropical Forestry are responsible for ensuring that personnel assigned responsibility for engineering activities provide technical expertise for the management and development of leases.
    3. Forest Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that staff officers responsible for engineering activities provide technical expertise for the management and development of leases.
    4. Leasing Officers are responsible for negotiating leases and the legal aspects of lease development.
  • FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 31.1

    Facility leases are negotiated contracts. The leasing officer must have considerable contractual and technical information available for analysis. A complete lease prospectus should cite program and space requirements, functional arrangements needed and location considerations. Development of leased facilities requires the combined expertise of contractual, architectural, safety, and engineering personnel. Therefore, the more information you can provide to the lease officer, the easier the leasing contract will be.

  • FSH 7309.11 Chap 30 sec 31.2 - Lease Considerations

    FSM 1241-Location and program needs significantly influence leasing. Location is the key factor in public contact and service. Because location affects overall cost, sufficiently document specific location requirements to respond to appeals and protests. Document critical program requirements used for the selection in the PPA.

    Program needs are further addressed under the Preliminary Project Analysis and Technical Requirements -FSH 7309.11 Chap 30 sec 31.3

  • FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 31.3

    Exercise care in design and specification of leased space requirements to reflect the Government's occupancy and period of interest. Ensure that the fascility can meet health, safety, program, and functional needs in a cost-effective manner.

    1. The Government identifies facility needs and, along with other requirements, specifies the needs in a formal request for proposal.
    2. The leasing officer evaluates offerings resulting from the request for proposal, ranks them for negotiation, and negotiates the lease.
    3. The lessor prepares the facility for Government occupancy in accordance with the negotiated agreement.
    4. The Government conducts a preoccupancy inspection.
    5. The Government occupies the facility.
  • FSH 7309.11 Chap 20 sec 23.4 - Stds of Economic Analysis

    The Office of Management and Budget and legislation established the following regulations governing Government investment analysis:

    1. Use OMB Circular No. A94, revised October 29, 1992 with a current year attachment for the nominal Treasury rate (App. C), for all preliminary project and similar facility investment alternative analyses.

      1. Analyze and display all costs in terms of current dollars, that is, include the effects of inflation.

      2. The analysis period should not extend beyond 30 years.

    2. For analysis of buildings and subsystem investments directly related to energy conservation, use of renewable energy sources, and similar projects, also use OMB Circular A-94 for the rate. The latest modified uniform discount tables are provided in 'Life Cycle Cost Manual for the Federal Energy Management Program', National Institute of Standards and Technology, Handbook No. 135 (annual edition published in April).

      This reflects the latest projections of future fuel costs.

      1. Consider all costs in terms of constant dollars, that is, exclude the effects of inflation.

      2. The analysis period for all projects should be limited to 25 years.
  • Responsibilities for constructing a facility fall within many program areas. Look at FSM 7310.4 - Responsibilities. You may want to look up your specific area of responsibility.

    The Forest Service is authorized to plan, design, and construct facilities to accomplish the agency's mission. FSH 7309.11 chap 30, sec 33 - Constructed Facilities.

  • Design and construction may be accomplished through the use of in-service personnel, contractors, or similar methods provided these criteria are met:

    1. Project Site Plans are completed in concert with long-range site development planning. Further information on Site Development Plans can be obtained at FSH 7309.11 Chapter 20 sec 24 - Site Development Plans.

    2. Qualified professionals utilizing recognized practices and applicable standards and codes carry out Design Standards.

    3. Prepare appropriate drawings and specifications for all construction and renovation work.

    4. Use qualified construction tradespeople, supervisors, and inspection personnel for all construction and renovation activities

    Coordinate the design and construction process with your facility engineer to assure structural and code requirements are met. The finished facility needs to meet the program needs.

    Other areas of interest include:

     FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 34.13 - Government Furnished Quarters

     FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 34.14 - Offices

     FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 34.16 - Access for Persons with Disabilities

  • FSH 7309.11, Chap 30 sec 34.21 with exhibit 01-Prospectus

    Exhibit 01 provides a format for both the draft and final (lease or design) prospectus.

    For the draft stage:

    • Identify the program, purpose, and need for the facility.

    • Provide a general description of the project, objectives, location requirements, and space and functional needs.

    For the final stage:

    • Document the Preliminary Project Analysis (PPA) and the proposed source of project funding. Ensure the funding corresponds with the appropriation and program criteria in FSH 6509.11g, chapter 41.11 to 41.2 - Funding.

    • Complete the development considerations when evaluating ownership or leasehold situations.

    A prospectus is not complete and valid until it includes the signature of the line officer of the requesting office.

    • The Conceptual design - FSH 7309.11, sec 34.22. a conceptual design is the designer's initial proposed design for a facility. Prepare a conceptual site plan to illustrate the relationships between proposed structure(s) with existing and proposed site conditions. Consider using Value Analysis (VA) to determine the optimal procedures and methods for facility acquisition.
    • Preliminary design - FSH 7309.11 sec 34.23. The preliminary design stage represents drawings at the 30 to 50 percent completion of design development. This stage provides management and technical staff specialists ensure that it meets program and functional need.
    • Final design - FSH 7309.11 sec 34.24. The final design consists of complete construction documents including construction site plans, landscape plans, working drawings, specifications, cost estimates, and contract requirements.
  • Here are two criteria that must apply:

    The A-94 Circular applies when both of the following tests are satisfied:

    1. The analysis concerns a capital asset which

      1. Is leased to the Federal Government for 3 yrs or more.

        Or

      2. Is new, with an economic life of less than 3 yrs and leased to the Federal Government for a term of 75% or more of the economic life of the asset.

        Or

      3. Is built for the purpose of leasing to the Federal Government.

        Or

      4. Is leased to the Federal Government with no future alternative commercial use.

    2. The lease analysis concerns a capital asset whose total fair market value exceeds $1 million.
  • INTRODUCTION

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the most cost effective way to acquire an office and warehouse complex to house the High Desert Interagency Partnership (HDIP) in Hines, Oregon. The options available are Lease and Purchase. Either option will require construction of a new facility as there is not one in the Burns/Hines area which meets the requirements.

    The analysis follows the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Guidelines Circular A?94 dated October 29, 1992. Discounted constant dollar values are used to compare present and future dollar values.

    OMB GUIDELINES

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in their Circular A?94, "Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit?Cost Analysis of Federal Programs", provides guidance for Lease?Purchase analyses which is to be followed for all analyses submitted to OMB in support of legislative and budget programs. The direction is summarized as follows:

    Life Cycle Costs - Use the net present value of the life?cycle costs as the basis for economic comparisons. For this study, present and future costs are compared using constant?dollar values.

    Discount Rates - OMB's 20 year discount rate for FY96 is 6.0 percent which is to be used in calculating the net present values. The rate is OMB's projection of the nominal interest rates for Treasury notes and bonds at specific maturities for the coming year.

    Lease Period - All renewal options are to be included when determining the lease period.

    Imputed Costs for Government-owned Assets - The following costs are to be imputed when the Government owns an asset that is part of the analysis:

    Property value - Use the current market value.

    Property Taxes - Use the tax rate of comparable properties in the locality.

    Insurance Premiums - Use the rate for standard commercial coverage.

    Residual Values - Estimated price the property can be sold for at the end of its economic life, measured in discounted, present value terms.


    BENCHMARK

    For this study, the benchmark for new office construction cost in the private sector for the coming year is $90 per gross square foot including site work and parking. Estimates for completing the new Forest Service lease building in John Day, Oregon (65 miles north of Burns) already exceed $87 per gross square foot, and the project isn't completed yet.


    ALTERNATIVES

    Lease

    The Government will lease a commercial facility from a private developer who will built it on private property expressly for the HDIP. All operation and ownership costs will be reflected in the lease rates.

    Purchase

    The Government will contract for the construction of the HDIP facility on existing government-owned property in Hines. The Federal Government through direct appropriation and/or other authorizations by Congress will pay for all construction expenses. Operation and maintenance costs will be paid from Agency operating funds.


    ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    The economic model used to calculate life-cycle costs, net present values, and annual costs is shown in Table 1, Lease-Purchase Comparison According to OMB A-94. The operation of the model is described below:

    Life-Cycle Costs

    Construction Costs The Purchase cost for the HDIP complex is $5.8 million. This is the estimate of the Government's cost to build the complex. It includes design, contract administration,agency overhead, and an imputed cost for the government property on which it will be located.

    The Lessor's construction cost was adjusted to the benchmark value of $90 per gross square foot for office construction. This equates to $114 per GSF for Purchase or Government construction cost. Thus, the Lessor has a cost advantage of 79 percent compared to government construction. The Lessor's costs are lower because of less overhead, lower design costs, and absence of a prevailing wage rate requirement.

    Residual Values The residual value of the improvements is their depreciated value based on the Lessor's cost of construction. Depreciation factors were taken from the Marshall Valuation Service, August 1994, published by Marshall and Swift. Life expectancies for the office and warehouse are estimated at 50 years and 40 years, respectively. Subsequently, the tables give the depreciation of the office at 17 percent, and the warehouses at 30 percent. All other site improvements are expected to depreciate 90 percent over the 20 years period.

    Debt Service The debt costs were calculated assuming the Lessor would invest an amount equal to 25 percent of the project cost from their own funds, and borrow the remainder on a mortgage. The mortgage rate was assumed to be 2 percent above the Treasury rate. The Lessor's rate of return on investment was assumed to be 1.5 percent above the mortgage rate.

    Ownership Costs Ownership costs include property taxes, insurance, maintenance reserves, and management. Hines property taxes are $15 per $1000. The other costs were calculated as a percentage of the Lessor's construction cost, and are based on unit costs that are average for Forest Service lease office space in Oregon and Washington.

    Maintenance reserves refer to the funds the owner sets aside for replacement of furnishing, equipment, exterior finishes, pavements, etc. that will be replaced over the life of the lease. The costs of ownership and operation were assumed to be the same for Lease or Purchase given the requirement that taxes and insurance be imputed on government?owned assets.

    Operating Costs Operating costs include janitorial services, utilities, maintenance, building manager, security, and landscape upkeep. Costs were calculated for the leasable building areas using rates typical for Forest Service leases in Oregon and Washington.

    Net Present Value Analysis

    Net Present Value (NPV) is useful for comparing the benefits and costs of competing alternatives that have incomes and expenses distributed over time. Future cash flows are discounted to present values using an appropriate discount rate. The method recognizes the time?value of money, and provides a common basis for comparing alternatives. NPV is the method preferred by OMB because it displays the total opportunity cost of a particular course of action. A way to visualize PNV is to think of it as the Sum of money needed to be invested today at the discount rate to produce a cash flow over time as proposed by the alternative.

    Economic Life The economic life for each alternative is 20 years, the maximum lease period.

    Purchaser Construction and Interest Expense Schedule Under the Purchase option, interest payments are calculated during the construction period and added to the construction costs to determine the construction NPV at the date of occupancy. The construction period is assumed to be 3 years, with cost percentages assigned as follows:

     

    ITEM YEAR PERCENT
    Preliminary Design 1 2%
    Design 2 12%
    Construction 3 86%

    Appreciation of Improvements It is anticipated that buildings and property will appreciate faster than the general rate of inflation. For this analysis, buildings are assumed to appreciate at 1.5 percent, and land at 0.5 percent per year.

    Annual Costs

    Another way to compare the Purchase and Lease options is to reduce their costs to an annual basis. This data is displayed in Part C of Table I. Construction and interest payments along with the residual value for the Purchase alternative were reduced to equal yearly payments using the appropriate capital recovery factor.


    COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES

    The Life Cycle Cost of each alternative, as reduced to a Net Present Cost in Table I, is listed below and displayed in Figure 1. The results are displayed as Costs rather than Values that changed the sign of the numbers (from negative to positive).

     

    ALTERNATIVE NET PRESENT COST SAVINGS
    Purchase $7,021,000 $621,000
    Lease $7,642,000  

    Purchase has the lower Net Present Cost, and therefore is the preferred alternative.


    SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    In order to determine the effects on the economic model of Table I to changes in the assumptions, scenarios were run using different variables. In each scenario, the variable being tested was adjusted so that the Lease vs. Purchase decision became neutral.

    Depreciation

    The average depreciation in the model is 27 percent. The residual value can drop to 41 percent of the Lessor's initial cost that equates to a depreciation factor of 59 percent before Lease becomes the preferred alternative.

    Discount Rate

    The discount rate has a significant impact on the amount of savings Purchase will produce as shown in Figure 1. If the discount rate drops to 5 percent, savings will jump to $946,000. At 8.5 percent, the Purchase-Lease decision becomes neutral.

    Appreciation

    The model used 1.5 percent for buildings, and 0.5 percent for land. These values can drop to a negative 1.4 percent before the lease-purchase decision becomes neutral.

    Lessor's Cost Advantage

    This variable is defined as the cost advantage a private contractor has over the Government due to lower overhead, lower design costs, and absence of a prevailing wage rate requirement. The economic model determined this rate to be 79 percent using a benchmark of $90 for new office construction. Under the scenario, the rate can drop to 71.5 percent before the lease-purchase decision becomes neutral. This equates to a contractor's office construction cost of $82 per gross square foot, which is below current costs for office construction.


     

    CONCLUSIONS

    Purchase will save $621,000 or 8 percent in life cycle costs over 20 years when compared to Lease.

    The Sensitivity analysis shows that normal variations in the economic variables will not change Purchase as the preferred alternative.

  • 1241 - FACILITY LOCATION. This section covers the establishment or relocation of offices, laboratories, and other service facilities. If an action also involves a change in the organization or number and size of units, see FSM 1225 and FSM 1243, respectively. See FSM 2473.03 for direction on location of nurseries.

    1241.01 - Authority. Departmental Regulation 1010-1. The Assistant Secretary for Administration retains the authority to approve new facilities in urban areas and the establishment, abolishment, or transfer of any Regional, Station, or Area headquarters office.

    1241.02 - Objective. To locate Forest Service facilities at sites that enable the unit to effectively accomplish its mission and serve the public, the Department, other Federal agencies, and State agencies.

    1241.03 - Policy. The policy of the Forest Service is to:

    1. Locate facilities in rural areas where it is practical to do so and program needs are adequately met. Consider:

      1. The availability of adequate, affordable housing for employees.

      2. Using existing Government-owned facilities that meet the needs of programs.

      3. The economic development and redevelopment of areas consistent with State, Regional, and local plans and programs.

      4. The social and economic impacts of changes in location on affected communities, on employees, and on affirmative action and other civil rights programs.

    2. As a guiding principle, colocate offices and/or share services when organizational units are located within 30 miles commuting distance.

      Apply items 1b, 1c, and 1d when considering colocation of offices and shared services.

    3. Encourage colocation and cross servicing with another Federal agency, a State, or a local government unit when missions are compatible and improved coordination can be achieved.

    4. The arrangements listed in items 1, 2, and 3 above must be cost effective, maintain adequate program support, provide adequate service to the public, and assure that quality resource management is continued. See FSM 1971 and FSM 7312 for direction on economic evaluations and facility planning.

    1241.04 - Responsibility

    1241.04a - Chief. The Chief approves changes that result in:

    1. Establishment, abolishment, or transfer out of a community or a rural area any facility involving 10 or more permanent employees.

    2. Colocation of Regional, Station, or Area offices.

    1241.04b - Regional Foresters, Station Directors, and Area Director. The Regional Foresters, Station Directors, and Area Director have authority and responsibility to approve:

    1. Colocating or moving facilities within the same community or the same rural area, except Regional, Station, and Area offices (FSM 1241.01); relocation of a Ranger District office where no changes in organization unit are contemplated, and socio-economic impacts on the communities or rural areas affected are minimal. Creation, abolishment, or consolidation of Ranger Districts, and establishment or relocating Supervisor Offices outside the same community or rural area must be approved by the Chief (FSM 1225 and FSM 1243).

    2. Exceptions to the policy to colocate and/or share services stated in FSM 1241.03, item 2.

    1241.05 - Definitions

    1. Urban Area. A city or town having a population of 50,000 or more, and any immediately adjacent area with a population density of more than 100 persons per square mile, according to the latest decennial census of the United States.

    2. Rural Area. Areas outside an urban area as defined in item 1.

    3. Establishment of Facility. Actions to acquire or lease real property for the purpose of housing any activity where the assignment or relocation of personnel will be involved.

    4. Relocation of Facility. Relocation of a facility involves moving a facility from one site to another site in the same community. It also includes the moving of an activity from one location to space available in an existing facility at another location.

    1241.1 - Proposal Submission. Submit proposals to establish, relocate, or abolish facilities to the appropriate approving official (FSM 1241.01, FSM 1241.04). Proposals must:

    1. Define the problem and describe the factors that necessitate the changes requested.

    2. Describe the alternative solutions considered.

    3. Analyze the alternatives.

    4. Recommend one alternative.

      Cover the applicable items listed in FSM 1225.2. For organizational and facility location studies, cover a full range of alternatives including the current situation, colocation, shared services, consolidation, reductions at all affected levels, and reductions in selected activities.

      See FSM 1730 and FSH 1709.11 for direction on preparing a Civil Rights Impact Statement. A Civil Rights Impact Statement is required for facility locations, or relocations, affecting 10 or more permanent employees.

      See FSM 1971 and FSM 7312 for direction on economic evaluations and facility planning.
  • FOREST SERVICE HANDBOOK
    WASHINGTON

    FSH 6509.11g - SERVICE-WIDE APPROPRIATION USE HANDBOOK

    Amendment No. 6509.11g-94-10

    Effective September 29, 1994

    POSTING NOTICE. Amendments are numbered consecutively by Handbook number and calendar year. Post by document name. Remove entire document and replace with this amendment. Retain this transmittal as the first page of this document. The last amendment to this Handbook was Amendment 6509.11g-94-9 to FSH 6509.11g,40 Contents.

    This amendment supersedes Amendment 6509.11g-91-1 to 6509.11g,40.

    Document Name Superseded
    (# of Pages)
    New
    (# of Pages)
    6509.11g,40 9 18

    Digest:

    Changes caption of chapter 40 from "Construction" to "Construction and Land Acquisition" and revises chapter throughout.

    41 - Adds revised policy on minor construction and multi-fund financing of facility construction projects.

    43 - Adds direction on land acquisition which was formerly in chapter 50.

    JACK WARD THOMAS

    Chief


    FSH 6509.11g - SERVICE-WIDE APPROPRIATION USE HANDBOOK
    WO AMENDMENT 6509.11g-94-10
    EFFECTIVE 9/29/94

    CHAPTER 40 - CONSTRUCTION AND LAND ACQUISITION

    40.1 - Authority.

    40.11 - Construction.

    1. Act of March 4, 1913 (16 U.S.C. 501). This Act provides for 10 percent of forest receipts to be used for the construction and maintenance of roads and trails within the national forests in the States from which such proceeds were derived. This authority has been overruled in the annual appropriation acts, which direct that the funds be transferred to miscellaneous receipts.

    2. Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1944 (7 U.S.C. 2250). Section 703 provides the authority to erect, alter, and repair buildings and other improvements on Federal land necessary to carry out authorized work, provided provision is made therefor in applicable appropriations.

    3. National Forest Roads and Trails Act of 1964 (16 U.S.C. 532-538); Highways Act of 1958 (23 U.S.C. 205); National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 U.S.C. 472a); Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974, Section 10(a), as amended (16 U.S.C. 1608). These Acts provide the authority for acquisition, construction, and maintenance of forest development roads and trails; cooperation with States, counties, and other subdivisions; construction of roads by timber purchasers; and election by timber purchasers to have the Forest Service construct the roads.

    4. Department of Agriculture Grants and Powers Act of 1965 (7 U.S.C. 2250a). Section 1 provides the authority for the erection of buildings and other structures on nonfederal land, with long-term lease and right to remove, and authorizes the use of appropriations for expenses necessary in acquiring long-term lease.

    5. National Trails System Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1241-1251). Sections 7 and 10 provide the authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for the National Trails System, and for development, management, and volunteer assistance on the system.

    6. Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1643(a)). Section 3 provides the authority for construction and acquisition of research laboratories and facilities, and the acquisition of necessary land.

    7. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act of 1978 (92 Stat. 1649). Section 18(e) provides the authority for construction of dispersed recreation sites and trails outside the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

    40.12 - Land Acquisition. In addition to the following authorities, new authorities are commonly provided in each of the acts establishing National Recreation Areas and Wildernesses and in other specific laws. Funds, when appropriated, are available for the specific purpose of each separate authorizing act for acquisitions.

    1. Weeks Act of 1911, as amended (16 U.S.C. 516, 521b). Sections 1 and 2 provide the authority for land acquisition for watershed protection and timber production. This is one of the primary authorities for acquisition of lands with Land and Water Conservation Fund moneys.

    2. Act of March 3, 1925, as amended (16 U.S.C. 555). This Act authorizes the purchase of land for administrative sites from the appropriation available for the purpose for which the land is to be used, when no suitable Government land is available. This authority is subject to an annual limitation of $50,000 Servicewide.

    3. Act of June 22, 1948, as amended (16 U.S.C. 577h). This Act authorizes appropriations for purchase and condemnation of lands in northern Minnesota.

    4. Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1956 (7 U.S.C. 428a(a)). This Act provides the authority for acquisition of land by purchase, exchange, or otherwise, to carry out authorized work, provided that provision therefor is made in applicable appropriations. This is one of the primary authorities for acquisition of lands with Land and Water Conservation Fund moneys.

    5. Wilderness Act of 1964, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1121 note, 1131-1136). Sections 5 and 6 provide authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the wilderness system.

    6. Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of September 3, 1964, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 to 460l-11). This Act provides for deposit of funds to be used for the acquisition of lands and interests for recreation, threatened and endangered species habitat, preservation of wetlands, and other purposes.

    7. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1277). Sections 6 and 16 provide the authority for land acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the wild and scenic river system.

    8. National Trails System Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1241-1251). Sections 7 and 10 provide the authority for land acquisition, exchange, and donation of lands for inclusion in the National Trails System.

    9. Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1534 and 1542). Sections 5 and 15 provide the authority for acquisition of land for the protection of threatened and endangered species.

    10. Eastern Wilderness Act of 1975 (16 U.S.C. 1132 note). Sections 6 and 9 provide the authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the Eastern Wilderness system.

    11. Act of October 10, 1978 (7 U.S.C. 2269). This Act provides the authority for the acceptance of donations of land or interests in land.

    12. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act of 1978 (92 Stat. 1654). Section 7(d)(3) provides the authority for funding the acquisition of lands and waters within the designated wilderness. Also, see 16 U.S.C. 577h cited in paragraph 3.

    13. Lake Tahoe Basin Act of 1980 (94 Stat. 3383). Section 3 provides the authority for land acquisition within the Lake Tahoe Basin.

    14. Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act of 1986 (16 U.S.C. 544g and 544n). Sections 9 and 16a of the Act provide the authority for land acquisition within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.

    40.5 - Definitions.

    Appropriated program funds. These funds include the National Forest System, Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, and Land Acquisition budget line items.

    Facilities construction project. Those activities that produce a fully functional, usable end-product as intended by design and in conformance with adopted standards, and which are in conformance with an approved facility master plan (FSM 7312 and FSH 7309.11, ch. 20). Examples for FA&O Construction are a completed office, a water system, or a combination of the two. Examples for Recreation Construction are a water system at a recreation site, additional campsites at an existing campground, or a complete campground facility with everything needed to make it fully functional.

    Facilities construction projects may be constructed in stages, such as additional wings or floors of buildings to better match available yearly funding levels. However, even if constructed in stages, they are still considered a single facility construction project.

    Minor facilities construction project. Those activities that produce a functionally complete project, as identified on an approved facility master plan, and whose direct construction costs payable from appropriated program funds (excluding planning and design costs), do not exceed $100,000. Examples include an office addition, a warehouse, a campground restroom, a utility system, or a research laboratory addition.

    A minor construction project does not include phased construction where one large project that is on the facility master plan is split into several small projects, and the total benefit to appropriated program funds is greater than $100,000. An example would be constructing or installing several smaller office "annexes" adjacent to an existing office, where the appropriated program funds contribution to the total cost of all the annexes exceeds $100,000.

    Using minor construction authority does not preclude constructing a project in separate stages, such as the foundation, framing, and electrical wiring, in 1 year or multiple years, as long as the total appropriated program funds contribution to the total project cost does not exceed the $100,000 limitation.

    41 - CONSTRUCTION (CNCN). The Construction appropriation is a definite, no-year, specific appropriation which has three budget line items: Construction of Facilities (sec. 41.1); Road Construction (sec. 41.2); and Trail Construction (sec. 41.3). This appropriation also identifies the authority for the timber purchaser road construction program limitation.

    Use these funds for:

    1. Construction, acquisition, restoration, and improvement of buildings, utility systems, dams, recreation facilities, and other facilities, and

    2. Construction and reconstruction of forest development roads and trails (including bridges) required for management, protection, and utilization of the National Forest System resources and for forest research.

    Land acquisition for administrative sites may be funded from this appropriation when it is a part of the total project cost. Do not use this appropriation for general administration charges, which are included under the National Forest System (NFS) appropriation.

    41.1 - Construction of Facilities. This budget line item (BLI), consists of the following expanded budget line items (EBLI): Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (sec. 41.11); Research Construction (sec. 41.12); and Recreation Construction (sec. 41.13). Use the Facilities Construction EBLI's for the construction of buildings and other facilities that support the Forest Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, Land Acquisition, and National Forest System programs. Such facilities include real property and/or capital investments, as well as those portable structures (trailers and modular units) that become an integral part of an administrative site. See section 40.5 for the definition of a construction project.

    This BLI includes recreation area development; water, sanitation, and electrical systems; administrative site acquisition and development; construction of offices, service and storage buildings, housing, nursery buildings, lookouts, and research laboratories; aircraft fields, service and other support facilities; and construction of dams. Facility construction includes major betterment, restoration, and relocation not classified as maintenance or repair.

    Do not charge Facility Construction for resource development projects which are an integral part of normal operating and research programs, or for temporary or emergency structures. Examples of these excluded items are: range fences, ponds for wildlife and range purposes, fish ladders, stream improvements, temporary landing strips or heliports for emergency fire situations, and the portions of nursery development or expansion discussed under nursery construction. Finance such development projects from the benefiting programs of which they are an integral part.

    41.11 - Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (CNFA). Use the following guidelines for determining the financing for Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (FA&O) improvements:

    1. Offices and Administrative Dwellings. Finance construction of offices and administrative dwellings at District, Forest, and Regional office administrative sites from CNFA, and work activity LF22 (FA&O).

    2. Barracks, Dormitories, and Messhalls. Finance construction of barracks, dormitories, and messhalls from CNFA, and work activity LF22 (FA&O). When use of the facility is expected to be fairly consistent over at least a 3-year period, and will benefit programs other than appropriated program funds, then the project may be financed from the benefiting funds or multi-financed.

    3. Other Buildings. Finance the construction of warehouses, storage buildings, utility buildings, and so forth, from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate amount of space needed in the building by each program.

    4. Utility Systems. Finance construction or replacement of sewer systems, water systems, electrical systems, and so forth, on the same basis as the improvement(s) served.

    5. Other Related Structures. Finance construction of fences, site service roads, sidewalks, and similar improvements on the same basis as the improvement(s) served.

    6. Seaplane and Boat Docks. Finance seaplane and boat docks from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate need of the programs requiring the dock. Do not consider incidental use by other activities resulting from the existence of the dock when financing.

    7. Airports, Heliports, and Airfields. Facility construction funds are available to build or purchase facilities for protection of the National Forest System from wildfires including construction, improvement, and acquisition of airports and structures thereon, heliports, lookouts, airfields, and helispots. Finance such structures from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate need of each program. Charge temporary facilities built for suppression of a going wildfire to the emergency firefighting fund (EFFS).

    8. Nurseries. Use CNFA funds to construct new tree nurseries or to expand existing nurseries, including the construction of service, storage, dwelling, office, greenhouse, and other buildings plus equipment which is an integral part of buildings, such as sewer, electrical, and water systems, including underground irrigation systems. Exclude the following items from Construction appropriation funding and fund these from benefiting funds: seed bed development (including land preparation), surface and subsurface drainage, above ground irrigation, perimeter fences, and personal property equipment within buildings.

      Construction of buildings devoted primarily to the Cooperative Work-KV (K-V) program, such as a tree cooler, may be charged to K-V. See FSH 2409.19, Knutson - Vandenberg (K-V) Fund Handbook, section 16.7, for guidance on the use of K-V funds for facilities construction.

      Replacement of buildings capitalized in the Working Capital Fund (WCF), may be funded from the WCF (FSH 6509.11f).
    1. Other Construction. Use CNFA for the construction of other general purpose buildings and facilities classified as capital assets that are not specifically mentioned in this section.

    41.12 - Research Construction (CNRE). Finance the construction of Research facilities from CNRE, and the Research Construction work activity (LR). Use these funds for the construction, improvement, and acquisition of all research purpose buildings and structures, including offices and residences. Funds are appropriated and allocated on a project basis. Charge energy retrofit activities benefiting these research facilities to this activity also.

    41.13 - Recreation Construction (CNRF). Finance the construction and reconstruction of recreation facilities from CNRF, and the Recreation Resource Improvement Construction work activity (AN22). Use these funds for addition and replacement of facilities at existing recreation sites and for new recreation construction projects. Recreation projects include visitor interpretive centers, campgrounds, picnic grounds, boat landings, swimming sites, and so forth.

    41.14 - Minor Facility Construction. Any benefiting program fund (or combination of funds) may be used in lieu of facility construction funds to finance the acquisition or construction of research, recreation, fire, administrative, and other buildings and structures when the estimated cost to be financed from appropriated program funds is less than $100,000 (exclusive of planning and design costs). See section 40.5 for the definition of appropriated program funds.

    Total construction costs can exceed $100,000 and still qualify as minor construction as long as the portion to be funded from appropriated program funds is under $100,000. An example would be a cooler for storing tree seedlings that is expected to cost $125,000, to be shared by National Forest System (NFS) - Reforestation ($40,000), Knutson-Vandenberg Trust Fund ($65,000), and Reforestation Trust Fund ($20,000). In this example, the appropriated program funds portion (NFS) is less than $100,000.

    Document cost and distribution estimates to show that all data utilized in the estimate were reasonable and that all cost items and benefits which were known or which reasonably should have been known at the time were included in the estimate.

    41.15 - Multi-Fund Financing. The acquisition of administrative sites and the acquisition or construction of facilities may be multi-financed from a combination of funds as follows:

    1. Partial Financing from Facility Construction Funds. Facility Construction funds may be combined with permanent and trust funds, such as Knutson-Vandenberg (CWKV), Salvage Sale (SSSS), Brush Disposal (BDBD), Cooperative Work-Other (CWFS), or Donated (GBGB) funds. These are all specific funds available for specific purposes.

      Use of K-V, BD, and SS funds are subject to the following conditions:

      1. To the extent such construction was provided for in the related timber sale appraisals.

      2. To the extent that the work remaining to be completed on timber sales will benefit from the facilities to be constructed.

    2. No Financing from Facility Construction Funds. Any available benefiting funds, up to a total of $100,000 from the following appropriations may be used in combination with partnership contributions, other agency appropriations, or permanent and trust funds to finance construction and reconstruction projects in direct proportion to the benefits to each program: Research (R), State and Private Forestry (S&PF), National Forest System (NFS), Forest Service Fire Protection (FP), or Land Acquisition (LA). Do not mix Facility Construction funds with these appropriated program funds.

      Road and trail construction funds may contribute to minor construction projects when the forest road program or the forest trail program receives benefit from the construction.

    3. Financing From the Working Capital Fund. Limit financing of buildings and structures from the Working Capital Fund (WCF) to replacement of those already capitalized in the WCF and then only with prior approval of the Washington Office Director of Fiscal and Accounting Services. However, Washington Office approval is not required for minor buildings, such as gas and oil houses. The local WCF financial manager shall approve financing for such minor buildings.

    4. Determining Appropriation Responsibility. Make a written record in the file for each building project to determine and justify appropriation responsibility. Prepare a sound plan to support the amount of each appropriation used to finance the construction project. As a basic principle, pay construction costs of structures from the appropriations that primarily require use of the structure. When a structure is needed to serve two or more appropriations, distribute the cost to those appropriations in proportion to the benefits.

      Use the most recent employees' salary financing plan as a basis for distributing building construction costs if the current plan reasonably represents the anticipated program for the next 3 years. Use full-time equivalent (FTE) staff years of employment rather than salary costs as the basis for distribution.

      In most cases it is difficult to forecast material changes in a program for succeeding years; therefore, determine whether any current programs are temporary with planned elimination or significant curtailment within the following 3 years. For example, if the annual work and financial plans include an emergency insect control project, exclude the FTE's associated with this project when determining distribution of building costs for permanent-type structures. Give similar consideration to amounts included in current financial plans for major nonrecurring road and other construction projects.

      Where the use by a benefiting appropriation is infrequent or incidental (5 percent or less), do not consider the appropriation in financing construction.


    5. Exhibits. Exhibits 01 through 03 provide guidelines on the use of funds for facility construction.

      a. Exhibit 01 - Guidelines for Financing Facility Construction. This exhibit shows the allowable funding mixes for different kinds of facility construction projects.

      b. Exhibit 02 - Decision Chart for Financing Facility Construction. This exhibit presents a decision-making aid for determining allowable funding mixes for facility construction projects under different conditions.

      c. Exhibit 03 - Sample Determination of Funding Responsibility for a Staff Barracks.


    41.15 - Exhibit 01

    Guidelines for Financing Facility Construction


    Constr.
    Appn.1/
    NFS,S&PF,
    Research and Fire
    Protection
    Permanent
    and Trust
    Funds 2/
    Partnership
    or Transfer
    Funds
    Offices and Primary
    Staff Dwellings at All
    Headquarter Locations
    Yes Yes 3/ No Yes
    All Other Facilities 4/

    Minor Construction:
     No Construction
    Appn. funding
    No Yes 3/ Yes Yes
     Construction
    Appn. funding
    requested
    Yes No Yes Yes
    Other Than Minor Yes No Yes Yes


      1/ Facilities Construction supports the Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, Land Acquisition, and National Forest System appropriations.

      2/ Permanent and Trust funds include Cooperative Work-KV (KV), Salvage Sales (SS), Brush Disposal (BD), Cooperative Work-Other, and Gifts. The KV, SS, and BD plans should provide for costs of needed facilities. (See section 16.7 of FSH 2409.19, Renewable Resource Uses for Knutson-Vandenberg (K-V) Fund Handbook for required approvals for construction of facilities with K-V Funds.) Permanent and Trust Funds are not available for general administrative facility construction.

      3/ Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, and National Forest System funds can be used as long as their cumulative share is under $100,000 and no Facilities Construction funds are involved.

      4/ If other programs besides those supported by the Construction appropriation are expected to benefit over a period of at least 3 years, the project may be multi-financed on the basis of salary financial plans and staff years of employment in each program area.


    41.15 - Exhibit 02

    Decision Chart for Financing Facility Construction

    Estimated cost
    $100,000+
    Estimated cost
    Under $100,000
    Will the construction benefit
    Forest Service appropriated
    fund programs? 1/
    Yes
     |
    \/No----->
    Use Option 1 Use Option 1
    Will other programs also benefit?
    Yes
     |
    \/ No ----->
    Use Option 2 Use Option 2
    or Option 3
    Is benefit to Forest Service
    appropriated fund programs
    over $100,00?

    Yes
     |
    \/ 
    No-----> Use Option 4
    or Option 5
    Use Option 4
    or Option 5
    Yes-------------------------------------> Use Option 4
    or Option 5
     N/A


    1/ See section 40.5 for the definition of appropriated program funds.



    41.15 - Exhibit 02 --Continued

    Financing Options for Facility Construction

    Option 1 - Use one or more funds that are available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation, such as Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds, when available and justified. No Facility Construction funds are involved.

    Option 2 - Use the Construction appropriation (regardless of cost) when requested and approved by Congress.

    Option 3 - Use a combination of Forest Service appropriated program funds (NFS, Research, S&PF, Fire Protection, and Land Acquisition). Total estimated cost, excluding planning and design, may not exceed $100,000.

    Option 4 - Use a combination of funds appropriated for facilities construction and other funds available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation, (Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds). Construction appropriation funds must be approved by Congress.

    Option 5 - Use a combination of Forest Service appropriated program funds (NFS, Research, S&PF, Fire Protection, and/or Land Acquisition) and other funds available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation (Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds). Total cost financed by Forest Service appropriated program funds may not exceed $100,000. No Facility Construction funds are involved.


    41.15 - Exhibit 03

    Sample Determination of Funding

    Responsibility for a Staff Barrack

    Assume that a 20-staff barracks is to be constructed at a work center for use of project crews financed by several appropriations.

    Insect and Disease Suppression personnel will use it for the current season only (a nonrecurrent project). Determine the basis as follows:

    Appropriation Current Salary
    Budget
    (Staff Years)
     (Percent)
    Construction
    Cost
    Distribution
    SPFS  1/
    CNFA 40 $60,000 2/
    CWKV 20 30,000 3/
    BDBD 20 30,000 3/
    SSSS 20 30,000 3/
    TOTAL 100% $150,000


      1/ Insect and Disease Suppression is eliminated in the distribution since its use is non-recurrent. Incidental use (less than 5 percent) should also be excluded.

      2/ The Facility Construction share would have to be requested and approved by Congress. (If not requested in the budget, this share would qualify for financing from project funds in lieu of Construction because the appropriated program fund portion is under $100,000).

      3/ As planned and funded in sale area improvement, fuel treatment, and salvage sale plans.

      NOTE: The same principle should be used to determine the multi-appropriation financing of mess halls or other buildings used by a number of employees.


    41.2 - Road Construction. Use this budget line item within the Construction appropriation for the construction and reconstruction of transportation facilities on the National Forest transportation system. Charge all costs of this work to one of the following internal budget line items:

    1. Recreation Roads (CNRN). Road construction funding used primarily to support the recreation program.

    2. Timber Roads (CNTM). Road construction funding primarily used to support the timber management program.

    3. General Purpose Roads (CNGP). Road construction funding not primarily used to support timber or recreation, but used to more evenly support all resource and administrative programs.

    41.21 - Appropriate Uses. Use road construction funds for:

      1. Activities in support of the construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities, and the purchase of rights-of-way. These activities include program administration, administrative support, transportation planning, interdisciplinary and ecological coordination, preconstruction engineering, and construction engineering. These activities support the Forest Road Program (FRP), the Purchaser Credit Program (PCP), and the Purchaser Election Program (PEP).

      2. Actual construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities, including roads, bridges, culverts, log transfer facilities, and so forth, and for the purchase of rights-of-way for forest development roads. Construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities include, but are not limited to, the following activities on or related to Forest Development Roads:

        1. Construction or reconstruction of roads leading to and within recreation areas and administrative sites, except where such costs have been included as part of the facility construction cost and budgeted from facility construction funds.

        2. Construction or reconstruction of parking areas in or adjacent to administrative sites, and parking areas and parking spurs, loops, and turnouts in or adjacent to recreation areas, except where such costs have been budgeted as part of the cost of the facility. (This excludes vehicle storage areas, and paved areas, sidewalks, and courts around and between buildings.)

        3. Augmentation of specified road construction or reconstruction in timber sale contracts as either contributed or supplemental funds.

        4. Construction or reconstruction of adjacent vehicular parking areas, and sanitary, water, and fire control facilities where needed for the safety and comfort of persons using the roads and when the costs are nominal (23 U.S.C. 205(d)).

        5. Acquisition and installation of regulatory, warning, and guide signs, and other traffic control devices when part of a road construction or reconstruction project.

        6. Construction or reconstruction of safety devices such as guardrails, object markers, delineators, and barriers.

        7. Construction or reconstruction of fences and cattle guards within the right-of-way to the extent required by law or to exclude stock from the roadway or from fenced areas cut by the roads.

        8. Removal or relocation of Forest Service utilities such as telephone poles and wires when necessitated by road construction or reconstruction. (The Forest Service has no authority to pay for the relocation or removal of private utilities from this appropriation, even if the planned activities of the Forest Service require the work. See Comptroller General's Decision A-38299, dated September 3, 1931 (Comp. Gen. A-38299); Title 23, United States Code, section 123 (23 U.S.C. 123); and Comptroller General's Decisions, volume 36, page 23 (36 Comp. Gen. 23), and volume 44, page 59 (44 Comp. Gen. 59), and decisions cited therein regarding exceptions and clarifications.)

        9. Construction or reconstruction of single purpose buildings, structures, and improvements used for servicing the forest development road program, when the total cost is less than $100,000.

        10. Disposal of slash created by road construction or reconstruction.

        11. Restoration of borrow pits and quarries used in road construction or reconstruction based on rehabilitation plans.

        12. Establishment of geodetic markers in accordance with specifications of Coast and Geodetic Survey, required for road construction or reconstruction activities; also, re-establishment of land line markings that would be disturbed by road construction or reconstruction.

        13. Payment of excess construction cost as provided for under cost share agreements.

        14. Obliteration of sections of road abandoned as part of re-alignment during a road reconstruction project.

        15. Mitigation of effects on historic or pre-historic properties discovered when planning, locating, constructing, or reconstructing a road.

    41.22 - Prohibited Work. Do not use Road construction funds to:

    1. Obliterate or return a road site to a near natural state (53 Comp. Gen. 328)

    2. Remove snow, except in emergency situations for protection of life and property or for official travel of road construction crews to and from work site.

    3. Construct or reconstruct docks and launching ramps for boats for recreation purposes.

    4. Construct or reconstruct temporary roads for emergency use such as insect control, flood, or fire suppression. These emergency roads should be financed from funds of the program that requires their construction.

    41.3 - Trail Construction (CNTR). Use this budget line item within the Construction appropriation for the construction and reconstruction of trails on the National Forest System including trails designated or to be designated on the National Trail System when administered by the Forest Service.

    41.4 - Timber Purchaser Road Construction Limitation. The Construction appropriation language includes an annual obligation limitation for construction of forest development roads by timber purchasers. This unfunded limitation is in lieu of direct appropriations and continues until used.

    Use this authorization, through credits to the timber sale accounts of timber purchasers, to finance only those forest development roads constructed or reconstructed under the terms and conditions of timber sale contracts and only to a standard necessary to harvest and remove the timber and other products covered by the particular sales. Do not use this authority to construct roads to a higher standard than needed to harvest and remove timber and other forest products covered by the particular sale. Charge the appropriate road construction internal budget line item for any such additional higher cost.

    41.5 - Watershed Restoration (CNWR). Use CNWR funds for road projects (such as road closure, obliteration, revegetation and drainage improvements), and for watershed projects (such as riparian revegetation, erosion control, and slide stabilization), in connection with the comprehensive restoration of key watersheds on the westside forests of Washington, Oregon, and northern California for which the appropriate watershed inventory and analysis have been completed. (Charge the inventories and analyses to funds provided under Salvage Sales.) Place priority on projects with the greatest impact on factors limiting salmon spawning, rearing and holding habitat, and projects with the greatest long-term positive impact.

    42 - LAND ACQUISITION - LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND (LALA). Funds are appropriated annually from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, but are no-year appropriations to the Forest Service for acquisition of land pursuant to the Land and Water Conservation Act, as amended, and other land acquisition authorities of the Forest Service (sec. 40.12).

    42.1 - Land Purchases (LALW). Charge LALW for:

    1. The actual cost of land purchased and

    2. Cash equalization payments for those exchanges that would otherwise qualify for purchase using Land and Water Conservation Fund money.

    42.2 - Acquisition Management (LALW). Charge LALW with the cost of planning and processing acquisition cases, including those exchanges that would otherwise qualify for purchase using Land and Water Conservation Fund money.

    43 - LAND ACQUISITION - SPECIAL ACTS (ACAC). This is a special fund appropriation to the Forest Service. Funds are appropriated annually from forest receipts from the occupancy of public land or from the sale of natural resources other than minerals. Receipts appropriated for land purchase are exempted from the provisions of Title 16, United States Code, sections 500 and 501 (Payments to States and road construction). All funds appropriated that remain unobligated at the end of the fiscal year are returned to the receipts of the affected national forests.

    Use these funds to purchase land and for related expenditures such as title search, escrow, recording, and personnel costs when the purchase is considered necessary to minimize soil erosion and flood damage. See additional purposes under Toiyabe National Forest (para. 3). Limit expenditures for each National Forest to amounts allocated and receipts actually available. See other restrictions under each authority cited in paragraphs 1 - 3. This appropriation is available for land acquisition within the exterior boundaries of the following national forests:

    1. Cache National Forest, Utah, Act of May 11, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 227). Funds are restricted to the purchase of lands in the State of Utah. Appropriation of receipts for land purchase shall have no effect on payments to the State of Wyoming.

    2. Uinta and Wasatch National Forests, Utah, Act of August 26, 1935, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 227). Funds are restricted to the purchase of lands in the State of Utah within the boundaries of the Uinta and Wasatch National Forests. Appropriation of receipts for land purchase shall have no effect on payments to the State of Idaho. In order to maintain the integrity of the distribution of receipts between the States of Utah and Idaho, any funds appropriated from the receipts of either forest may only be used to purchase land on the same national forest.

    3. Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada, Act of June 25, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 228). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in the State of Nevada, not to exceed $10,000 per annum. The Act contains no restriction as to the effect on payments to the State of California. Therefore, any funds from the whole forest are available up to the stated limit. In addition to purchasing land to minimize soil erosion and flood damage, this fund may also be used to purchase land to promote efficiency and economy of administration.

    4. Angeles National Forest, California, Act of June 11, 1940 (54 Stat. 299). Funds are available for purchase of lands within the boundary of the Angeles National Forest.

    5. Cleveland National Forest, California, Act of June 11, 1940 (54 Stat. 297). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in San Diego County, California. Funds shall be derived from the portion of receipts of the Cleveland National Forest which are equal to the proportion of the area of the forest that is in the county of San Diego.

    6. San Bernardino and Cleveland National Forests, California, Act of June 15, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 228). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in Riverside County, California. Funds shall be derived from the portions of receipts of the San Bernardino and Cleveland National Forests which are equal to the proportion of the area of each national forest that is in the county of Riverside.

    7. Sequoia National Forest, California, Act of June 17, 1940 (54 Stat. 402). Funds are available for purchase of lands within the boundary of the Sequoia National Forest.

    44 - LAND ACQUISITION FOR EXCHANGES (EXEX). This indefinite, no-year appropriation is authorized by the Act of December 4, 1967, as amended (16 U.S.C. 484a). All deposits received during the fiscal year are made available by the annual Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation Act. The authorizing legislation provides for cash deposits of a portion or all of the value of the selected lands in exchange cases with States, local governments, and public school districts or other public school authority, to be used to purchase similar lands.

    Collections deposited in the special receipt account are made available by annual appropriation to meet specific land acquisition needs. Lands acquired with these funds must be in the same State and must have the same status as the selected lands involved in the exchange. Identify each collection and expenditure by the class of land and the State in which the selected lands are located.

    45 - OTHER SPECIAL LAND ACQUISITION FUNDS. This section represents land acquisition funds under prior year appropriations that are continuing or from special one time laws passed to purchase specific tracts, such as Klamath Land Acquisition (KLKL) and Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area land acquisition (CLCL).

  • FOREST SERVICE HANDBOOK
    WASHINGTON

    FSH 7309.11 - BUILDINGS AND RELATED FACILITIES HANDBOOK

    Amendment No. 7309.11-95-4

    Effective January 9, 1995

    POSTING NOTICE. Amendments are numbered consecutively by Handbook number and calendar year. Post by document name. Remove entire document and replace with this amendment. Retain this transmittal as the first page of this document. The last amendment to this Handbook was Amendment 7309.11-95-3 to FSH 7309.11,20 Contents.

    This amendment supersedes Amendment 7309.11-91-3 to 7309.11,20.

    Document Name Superseded
    (# of Pages)
    New
    (# of Pages)
    7309.11,20 12 13

    Digest:

    20.4 - Adds responsibility section.

    22- Adds clarifying statement that the age of the structure is an indicator of potential historic value but will not automatically qualify the facility as historically significant.

    23.4 - Changes the use of a fixed 7 percent discount rate for analysis of buildings and investments to using the current Office of Management and Budget (OMB) required rate.

    23.5 - Adds the work "Project" to caption to differentiate between general planning in section 21.1.

    23.52 - Replaces the word handicap with accessibility.

    JACK WARD THOMAS

    Chief


    FSH 7309.11 - BUILDINGS AND RELATED FACILITIES HANDBOOK
    WO AMENDMENT 7309.11-95-4
    EFFECTIVE 1/9/95

    CHAPTER 20 - PLANNING

    This chapter includes direction for facility master planning and the preliminary analysis process for specific projects. See FSM 7311 for related direction for the facility management process.

    20.2 - Objective. To ensure that there is adequate planning to protect major capital investments and operation and maintenance outlays for facilities.

    20.4 - Responsibility. Regional Foresters, Station Directors, the Area Director, and the Director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry are responsible for developing multiyear budget plans to meet the needs of the unit.

    21 - GENERAL PLANNING.

    21.1 - Planning Considerations. The exhibits in chapter 10, section 11 illustrate the various considerations involved in facility planning. The facilities master plan guides further planning of those facilities to be acquired. A preliminary project analysis aids in determining the best alternative based on the considerations of location, acquisition method, and cost-effectiveness that best meet management needs.

    21.2 - Inventory Information. The facilities information system may store data covering existing and planned improvements, including renovation, modifications, and major maintenance needs. Specific details of this system are in chapter 60.

    The inventory may:

    1. Provide information for forecasting and establishing capital and maintenance budgets.

    2. Serve as a useful tool for facility evaluation and monitoring and for assignment of project priorities.

    3. Assist in evaluating major renovation and maintenance against replacement plans.

    4. Serve as a continuing record for new management and technical personnel.

    5. List proposed new buildings and planned replacements.

      Develop the inventory from several sources, such as inspections, records, and site development plans.

    22 - FACILITIES MASTER PLAN. Prepare a facilities master plan in conformance with FSM 7312.1 and FSM 1241. The facilities master plan must conform with the direction established by the Forest Land and Resource Management Plan. The facilities master plan clarifies existing Forest plan direction and guides, in a general way, the acquisition, continued use, and disposal of facilities.

    The plan should include, but need not be limited to:

    1. A Forest/Station-wide review of:

      1. Current volume of business and projections for the future.

      2. The best locations for needed skills to perform program work.

      3. Existing administrative sites and proposed locations for new sites.

      4. Short- and long-term management strategies concerning unit consolidation and/or sharing services between units (FSM 2335.5).

    2. Regional/inter-Regional/national support requirements such as fire management, nursery production, and visitor service activities.

    3. A map depicting the name, location, type, mission or purpose, responsibility, and assignment of all facilities.

    4. For each site, a tabular listing of all buildings, related structures, and utilities covering size, age, maintenance level, condition, and other pertinent information regarding the site facilities.

    5. Recommendations for disposition, that is, a declaration of what is excess to Forest Service needs, what the Forest Service should keep, or what it should acquire, along with reasons for these actions. In the context of section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, such declarations are "significant federal undertakings" and, thus, require evaluation of all potentially historic structures included in the plan.

    6. Identification and evaluation of applicable property or buildings of potential historic value. Age of the structure is an indicator of potential historic value, but will not automatically qualify the facility as historically significant. Consider developing disposition recommendations in three steps:

      Develop preliminary recommendations.Determine cultural resource values, as appropriate. Make final recommendations of disposition after considering appropriate reuse of historic facilities.

      If determinations of cultural values have been made, document the results of those determinations.

    7. A listing of major existing health and safety hazards, energy retrofit needs, and known maintenance impacts.

    8. A listing of all new construction, renovation, refurbishing, and major maintenance projects needed at each site. List projects to be funded by the Facilities Construction Appropriation for Fire, Administrative, and Other (FA&O), Research Construction, and those to be funded by the nonconstruction appropriation sources. Nonconstruction sources are other agency funds and agency collections that would share construction expenses in proportion to the benefiting use, such as Knutson-Vandenberg (KV) funds for tree coolers. List the funding by source, for example: Cooperative Work Forest Service (CWFS); Knutson-Vandenberg (KV); Brush Disposal (BD); and Salvage Sale Funds (SSF). These projects must be shown in the master plan by funding source to establish a basis for collection of these funds. (FSH 6509.11g, chapter 40).

      Use the facilities master plan as a tool for organizing, illustrating the opportunities for, and assigning principal facility support activities in the unit. Update the plan periodically to reflect current management objectives and strategies.

    23 - PRELIMINARY PROJECT ANALYSIS.

    23.1 - General. The preliminary project analysis provides the review of all viable project alternatives through a screening and analytical evaluation process; it also provides recommendations for further specific project development action. Engineering studies and investigative work must be commensurate with the scope of the proposed project. The scope and depth of each step in the analysis must be sufficient to provide a reasonable comparison among alternatives.

    If purchasing or exchanging a facility is chosen in lieu of constructing a facility, review the project development steps shown in chapter 30, section 33. The purpose is to ensure coordinated follow-through is done to provide a facility that best meets current management objectives.

    Preliminary inspections necessary for the site or facility evaluation report may require onsite visits. Secure a written agreement to allow access, inspection, and testing as necessary. Normally, the purchase or exchange of property must involve willing parties. Access and reasonable investigation reflect the willing intent of both parties. Preliminary investigation of the viability of the property for Government use does not require the Secretary's approval (FSM 5420).

    23.2- Preliminary Project Analysis Process. Include the following stages in the preliminary project analysis. These stages are further described in "Making Sound Facility Development Decisions," Engineering Management Series EM-7310-2. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, P.O. Box 96090, Washington, DC 20090-6090.

    1. Clarify project needs stated in the facility master plan.

    2. Identify appropriate evaluation criteria.

    3. Establish minimum requirements for a feasible alternative.

    4. Develop a broad range of alternatives that meet minimum requirements. Re-examine minimum requirements, if appropriate.

    5. Gather data about expected performance of alternatives with respect to evaluation criteria.

    6. Select the preferred alternative by analyzing tradeoffs.

    23.3 - Preliminary Project Analysis Elements. The preliminary project analysis should include the following elements:

    1. Draft Prospectus. The draft prospectus serves as the basic statement of project need, objectives to be met, and facility requirements. Use a draft prospectus for the preliminary project analysis.

      See section 34.21 for guidelines and format for developing the draft prospectus.

      Because leasing and ownership are evaluated as equally desirable, base space and facility needs on required organization staffing and activity support for an equal period of time, but no less than a 10-year projection.

    2. Location Analysis. Location, perhaps more than any other factor, affects the decision of where to develop the facility, the ability to effectively manage programs, and the cost of overall management activities. Because the location of a facility may affect operational patterns on adjacent organizational units, project location analysis may also serve to test and update the facility master plan and examine current thinking in management objectives, operation improvements, and other aspects involving facility support.

      There are two distinct steps in the project location analysis. The first step examines specific legislation and Departmental direction that may preempt some location options from further study. The proposed facility must meet the general location requirements of the Secretary's Memorandum 1994 (Sec. Memo. 1994), FSM 1220, and FSM 1240. Submit requests for approval of a specific location or relocation to the appropriate line officer only after presenting study recommendations.

      The second step involves the selection and analysis of specific sites. When selecting sites or facilities, consider the cost of operation, field travel requirements, proximity to the population served, and other factors, depending on the purpose of the particular facility. In certain facilities the cost of operating from a specific location is the dominant life-cycle cost component for the facility. In these situations ensure that the location analysis is objective and adequate for determining the general optimum transportation cost area.

      In addition, request from the General Services Administration a list of available Government-owned facilities or space in the immediate area of need. This is a request of availability only. Available Government-owned space should be considered as an alternative in the preliminary project analysis. If current Government-owned space does not meet needs, document that finding.

    3. Alternative Analysis. Review all viable facilities and sites within the general geographic location identified near optimum in the location analysis. Perform an informal preliminary survey to identify suitable potential sites and buildings for lease or purchase. Identify potential construction sites. Ensure that all alternatives under consideration will similarly meet program needs.

      Evaluate sites or buildings under consideration to identify potential development, operating, maintenance, and occupancy costs, and list specific conditions or attributes (sec. 23.1). Analyze the life-cycle cost of top candidates, including travel costs (sec. 23.4). See EM-7310-2 for methods of performing a tradeoff analysis.

    4. Conceptual Design. A conceptual design includes:

      1. Desirable features that enhance public contact.

      2. Optimum contact between functional areas necessary for efficient operation.

      3. Space requirements determined on a 10-year projection of need.

        Use bubble or flow diagrams, conceptual layouts, and identify space requirements to compare alternative sites with existing facilities, and estimate the cost of leasing compared to the cost of new construction.

    Recommendations. The analysis, supporting documentation, and recommendations serve as a basis for an environmental assessment report. Submit these documents to the appropriate line officer for use in determining the actions needed. Both long- and short-term actions may be required.

    23.4 - Standards for Economic Analysis. Using standard economic analysis techniques, analyze the cost-effectiveness of buildings, related facilities, building systems, and equipment. Ordinarily, use total life-cycle costing (present worth) analysis techniques. The Office of Management and Budget and legislation established the following regulations governing Government investment analysis.

      1. Use OMB Circular No. A-94, revised October 29, 1992 with a current year attachment, for all preliminary project and similar facility investment alternative analyses. Guidance for the use of A-94 for Forest Service facilities evaluations is provided in Engineering Management Publication EM-7310-5, "A Revised Economic Evaluation Policy for Facilities."

        1. Analyze and display all costs in terms of current dollars, that is, include the effects of inflation.

        2. The study period should not extend beyond 30 years.

      2. For analysis of buildings and subsystem investments directly related to energy conservation, use of renewable energy sources, and similar projects, also use OMB Circular A-94 for the rate. The latest modified uniform discount tables are provided in Life-Cycle Cost Manual for the Federal Energy Management Program revised 1987, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Handbook No. 135. This reflects the latest projections of future fuel costs.

        1. Consider all costs in terms of constant dollars, that is, exclude the effects of inflation.

        2. The study period for all projects should be limited to 25 years.

    23.5 - Project Planning Considerations.

    23.51 - Site or Facility Evaluation Report. The evaluation report provides information about the suitability and adaptability of the site or facility to meet Forest Service needs. It identifies needed improvement, as well as the operation and maintenance costs required to support the proposed activities. The report ensures that the decisionmaker is aware of the scope of long-term cost commitments.

    This evaluation should be used to investigate lease or purchase options as well as the viability of reusing existing Forest Service-owned buildings, especially when significant changes in function or occupancy levels are proposed.

    23.52 - Procedures and Format. Because of the variety of existing or proposed site possibilities and facility types, a complete listing of items to investigate is impractical. Consider the following procedures and recommended content in determining the scope of investigation and evaluation. Actual investigation should be commensurate with the scope and effect of the facility location, operations, and investment.

      1. Ensure that the evaluation team includes members with architectural, electrical, mechanical, civil and environmental engineering, landscape architectural, and other professional skills as appropriate.

      2. Review the proposed use of the facility. Consider the following:

        1. Primary and secondary operations, programs, and uses served.

        2. Number of employees and visitors served.

        3. Special program needs for public service, field operations, reforestation, fire suppression, and so forth.

        4. Physiological and psychological needs of employees and visitors.

        5. Host program considerations.

      3. Conduct a field review by inspecting the property. Carefully evaluate:

        1. Improvements needed to bring the property to an acceptable level for intended use.

      4. Include the following in the Site or Facility Evaluation report format:

        1. Name of the proposed project.

          1. Statement of appropriateness of the property for the intended use over time.

          2. Summary estimates of new improvements, renovation, and repair as well as anticipated annual operation and maintenance costs. Highlight primary or special needs.

          3. Special features, advantages, and disadvantages of the proposed site.

          4. The character of the neighborhood and surrounding environment, present zoning or land-use patterns, and foreseeable changes or trends for the next 20 years.

          5. Size, shape, and general usability of the site or building; present or intended occupancy type; and adaptability of the site or building for the proposed use and support activities. Use sketches and measurements of the probable site layout or buildings to determine adequacy of size, usability, or adaptability.

          6. An assessment of whether the general quality of the property (site or building) befits the Agency and, if required, provides a good public image and service.

          7. Availability and adequacy of waste disposal systems, potable water, electrical power, natural gas, fuel oil and propane supplies, security services, and fire protection. Include cost estimates for extending or developing these services and recurring fees for these systems or services.

          8. Site drainage and soil characteristics. Observe and estimate drainage, water table, flood plain, soil permeability, and bearing capacity. Test major sites to determine subsurface conditions and the degree of difficulty or opportunity for locating buried powerlines, grading the site, constructing building foundations, and the likely success of revegetation efforts.

          9. Condition and adequacy of existing buildings for the proposed use. Give consideration to the following items:

          10. Type of construction and present or designed occupancy type.

          11. Effectiveness of the proposed or probable functional arrangement of space.

          12. Adequacy of ingress, external and internal horizontal and vertical circulation, and code-approved fire egress.

          13. Fire resistivity rating of building components and horizontal and vertical separations.

          14. Fire detection, alarms, and suppression systems in the building.

          15. Condition and maintainability of heating, ventilation, air-conditioning (HVAC), and other utility systems.

          16. Quality and condition of major building envelope components including the foundation, walls, windows, entry ways, and roof.

          17. Ability to comply with accessibility design requirements.

          18. Apparent adequacy of structural load-bearing members and design loading of floors.

          19. Building support services, for example: loading docks and janitorial closets.

          20. Adequacy of interior and exterior lighting.

    23.6 - Government-Furnished Quarters - Planning Considerations.

    1. General. Seek employee quarters and, in particular, employee family housing in the private sector. When private quarters are inadequate, substandard, or unavailable, the Government may provide quarters for employees or employees and their families. The Government may also require employees to reside at an administrative site to provide public service or protect Government property.

      1. As outlined in FSM 7312.1, analyze the need for Government-furnished quarters of all types.

      2. If the surveys show that rental or purchasable housing and commercial supporting facilities (motels, hotels, restaurants, and boarding houses) are not available to employees, the Government may construct suitable facilities, such as family dwellings, mobile homes, barracks, and cookhouses, on administrative sites. See FSM 7312.2 for additional direction.

      3. See FSM 6445 and FSH 6409.11 for directions on occupancy of Government-furnished quarters.

    2. Survey of Availability. In conjunction with the preliminary project analysis, determine the potential supply of alternative support facilities in the private sector. Units shall conduct surveys and canvass needs as follows:

      1. Conduct surveys for alternatives to Government-furnished quarters as outlined in FSM 6445. Consider local commuting possibilities.

      2. Document the following on an as-needed basis:

        1. Suitable, available housing in and adjacent to the established communities for the last 3 years.

        2. Suitable commercial sources for feeding and housing work crews in and adjacent to the established communities for the last 3 years.

        3. Suitable buildings and facilities potentially available for purchase or for exchange.

          Prepare site or facility evaluation reports (sec. 23.51) as needed.

    3. Justification. Justify each project to furnish Government quarters on the basis of need and unavailability of alternatives. Forward justification statements with a budget request.

    24 - SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN.

    The site development plan, or site plan, depicts the logical and progressive establishment or replacement of improvements, buildings, pedestrian and vehicular circulation ways, and utilities needed for effective use of the site. Physical conditions, opportunities, needs, zoning, and management objectives shape the site plan.

    All administrative sites owned by the Forest Service should have a current, approved site development plan. Such plans are mandatory prior to further development. Plans are the graphic description of the present site conditions, improvements, and latest planning proposals for the ultimate development of the site.

    The site development plan is used in all three phases of facility management (FSM 7311) and, depending on the specific use, can have various names. Use the site development plan in:

    1. Facility planning.

      1. To depict conceptual or existing site zoning. The plan illustrates present and proposed design schemes for effective use of the site.

      2. To evaluate potential sites during the preliminary project analysis and for special studies.

      3. To depict existing facilities and utilities and recommended locations to meet current and long-range management plans.

    2. Development of individual projects.

      1. To provide a basis for orientation and continuity for individual building siting, grading, and landscaping plans for the project. These plans are larger scale drawings of the project requirements and normally include construction controls for project stakeout. The contract documents include these plans.

      2. To provide a graphic illustration of the project site and scope of work. Generally, these plans show only existing conditions (topography and improvements) and the work proposed for the project.

    3. Facility operation. To provide a record of existing facilities, utility locations, and other improvements for reference, work planning, and emergency response.

    24.1 - Features. The site development plan consists of two parts: a site survey plat and development plan. The site survey consists of the basic site information and all existing features. The development plan provides conceptual and specific proposed improvements.

    Site development plans should include the items listed below. As necessary, use several sheets and overlays to separate categories of graphic data. Provide appropriate tabular data.

      Major natural and physical features such as topographic, hydrographic, vegetative, and cultural features on the site; adjacent conditions and improvements within 50 to 100 feet of the property that influence the development of the site, such as roads, streets, water mains, sewers, and drainage structures. Provide the depth of water mains and invert elevations of gravity sewer manholes. Show the ownership of utility systems. A contour interval of 2 feet or less is necessary in order to determine the surface drainage patterns.

  • Legal requirements imposed by local ordinances and zoning requirements, building setback lines, county and city zoning designations (if applicable), and easements conveyed to third parties.

  • Climatological data and general site features, such as prevailing winds, roof snow loading and normal peak seasonal ground snow cover, maximum and minimum design temperatures, recorded temperature extremes, seismic zones, rainfall intensity, dominant views, stream flow conditions, and a flood plain description (horizontal and vertical) estimated for a 100-year storm occurrence. Depict appropriate data and features graphically or show them in tabular form.

  • Existing site improvements; show ownership if non-Forest Service.

    1. The site survey plat should depict:

      1. A plot of the site property boundary survey or site traverse with bearings and distances of lines and descriptions of monuments and major internal horizontal and vertical survey or aerial photography controls. As practical, tie the survey to major references such as the General Land Office grid or U.S. Department of the Interior Geological Survey elevations.

      2. Major natural and physical features such as topographic, hydrographic, vegetative, and cultural features on the site; adjacent conditions and improvements within 50 to 100 feet of the property that influence the development of the site, such as roads, streets, water mains, sewers, and drainage structures. Provide the depth of water mains and invert elevations of gravity sewer manholes. Show the ownership of utility systems. A contour interval of 2 feet or less is necessary in order to determine the surface drainage patterns.

      3. Legal requirements imposed by local ordinances and zoning requirements, building setback lines, county and city zoning designations (if applicable), and easements conveyed to third parties.

      4. Climatological data and general site features, such as prevailing winds, roof snow loading and normal peak seasonal ground snow cover, maximum and minimum design temperatures, recorded temperature extremes, seismic zones, rainfall intensity, dominant views, stream flow conditions, and a flood plain description (horizontal and vertical) estimated for a 100-year storm occurrence. Depict appropriate data and features graphically or show them in tabular form.

      5. Existing site imporvements; show ownership in non-Forest Service.

        1. Site drainage structures or systems and controlling appurtenances.

        2. Utilities, both above and below ground.

          1. Power. Show the location of poles, lines, transformers, capacity (in kilovolt amperes) and phase, service drops, and building entrance points.

          2. Water. Show the location, size, and type of construction materials, the location of valves and system appurtenances, the average depth of buried lines, the location of building entrances, and hydrants.

          3. Wastewater collection. Show the location, size, and type of construction materials of collector sewers and mains, outfall invert elevations of manholes, system appurtenances, lift stations, and treatment plants. Indicate the location of individual building service connections and disposal systems, including septic tank location and size, distribution boxes, and drainfields and cesspools, as applicable.

          4. Fuel systems (central oil, gas, or steam systems). Show the location, size, and construction of lines, tanks, drains, valves, appurtenances, and building entrances.

        3. Buildings and major structures.Show an outline (footprint) of the first floor or ground exterior lines (major horizontal projections above the first floor) as appropriate: finished first floor elevation of all buildings, inventory identification numbers, and name or use of major buildings.

        4. Roads, parking, pedestrian walks, and fences. Show location and finished surface material or type of construction.

        5. Other features. Show the location of major signs, loading ramps, corrals, storage yards, helipads, radio antennas, and similar dedicated-use areas.

    2. The development plan should depict the conceptual or designed location and "footprint" of all planned roads, buildings, and utilities to show the size and orientation. Include all proposed grading and surface drainage features.

      Show planned features, both conceptual and those with completed preliminary designs, in a manner that illustrates the different planning levels. Also show the type, size, and location of utilities and other discrete, controlling features that affect future extensions, future facilities, or the operation or modification of existing facilities.

    3. Tabulate data unsuitable for graphic depiction such as existing and proposed uses of buildings; the gross or net square footage of buildings, date constructed, and other features or remarks, such as buildings on the site either owned or occupied by non-Forest Service personnel; number of floors per building; and major plans, such as for renovation or demolition.

      List the above data on the site plan or attach computer printouts.

      Regions and Stations should develop graphic standards and development procedures and processes as needed for uniformity of site development plans, site landscape plans, building site, grading, and landscape plans, and other similar documents.

    24.2 - Maintenance. Regions and Stations should establish criteria for maintaining current, approved site development plans. Maintain site development plans to ensure that information on the site survey and development plans is current. Adjust features after completing major studies or planning efforts and construction. Periodically review the plans to ensure that the existing and proposed features meet long-term management objectives.

    1. Consider using orthophotographs or digital photographic methods (computer aided drafting) for major periodic revisions of large complexes.

    2. Separate sheets and overlays with various types of existing or planned facilities to aid the maintenance of the site development plan. Consider colored overlays to facilitate photographic transfer of data for developing composite or project plans.

    3. Generally, review and revise site plans as needed. Consider changes in organizational boundaries or management needs when evaluating the appropriateness of the existing site plan. Review and make revisions before beginning a major construction project.

      Use the site development plan as a source document for unscheduled reviews of space, land utilization, or requests for capital investment or reinvestment projections.
  • FOREST SERVICE HANDBOOK
    WASHINGTON

    FSH 6509.11g - SERVICE-WIDE APPROPRIATION USE HANDBOOK

    Amendment No. 6509.11g-94-10

    Effective September 29, 1994

    POSTING NOTICE. Amendments are numbered consecutively by Handbook number and calendar year. Post by document name. Remove entire document and replace with this amendment. Retain this transmittal as the first page of this document. The last amendment to this Handbook was Amendment 6509.11g-94-9 to FSH 6509.11g,40 Contents.

    This amendment supersedes Amendment 6509.11g-91-1 to 6509.11g,40.

    Document Name Superseded
    (# of Pages)
    New
    (# of Pages)
    6509.11g,40 9 18

    Digest:

    Changes caption of chapter 40 from "Construction" to "Construction and Land Acquisition" and revises chapter throughout.

    41 - Adds revised policy on minor construction and multi-fund financing of facility construction projects.

    43 - Adds direction on land acquisition which was formerly in chapter 50.

    JACK WARD THOMAS

    Chief


    FSH 6509.11g - SERVICE-WIDE APPROPRIATION USE HANDBOOK
    WO AMENDMENT 6509.11g-94-10
    EFFECTIVE 9/29/94

    CHAPTER 40 - CONSTRUCTION AND LAND ACQUISITION

    40.1 - Authority.

    40.11 - Construction.

    1. Act of March 4, 1913 (16 U.S.C. 501). This Act provides for 10 percent of forest receipts to be used for the construction and maintenance of roads and trails within the national forests in the States from which such proceeds were derived. This authority has been overruled in the annual appropriation acts, which direct that the funds be transferred to miscellaneous receipts.

    2. Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1944 (7 U.S.C. 2250). Section 703 provides the authority to erect, alter, and repair buildings and other improvements on Federal land necessary to carry out authorized work, provided provision is made therefor in applicable appropriations.

    3. National Forest Roads and Trails Act of 1964 (16 U.S.C. 532-538); Highways Act of 1958 (23 U.S.C. 205); National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 U.S.C. 472a); Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974, Section 10(a), as amended (16 U.S.C. 1608). These Acts provide the authority for acquisition, construction, and maintenance of forest development roads and trails; cooperation with States, counties, and other subdivisions; construction of roads by timber purchasers; and election by timber purchasers to have the Forest Service construct the roads.

    4. Department of Agriculture Grants and Powers Act of 1965 (7 U.S.C. 2250a). Section 1 provides the authority for the erection of buildings and other structures on nonfederal land, with long-term lease and right to remove, and authorizes the use of appropriations for expenses necessary in acquiring long-term lease.

    5. National Trails System Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1241-1251). Sections 7 and 10 provide the authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for the National Trails System, and for development, management, and volunteer assistance on the system.

    6. Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1643(a)). Section 3 provides the authority for construction and acquisition of research laboratories and facilities, and the acquisition of necessary land.

    7. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act of 1978 (92 Stat. 1649). Section 18(e) provides the authority for construction of dispersed recreation sites and trails outside the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

    40.12 - Land Acquisition. In addition to the following authorities, new authorities are commonly provided in each of the acts establishing National Recreation Areas and Wildernesses and in other specific laws. Funds, when appropriated, are available for the specific purpose of each separate authorizing act for acquisitions.

    1. Weeks Act of 1911, as amended (16 U.S.C. 516, 521b). Sections 1 and 2 provide the authority for land acquisition for watershed protection and timber production. This is one of the primary authorities for acquisition of lands with Land and Water Conservation Fund moneys.

    2. Act of March 3, 1925, as amended (16 U.S.C. 555). This Act authorizes the purchase of land for administrative sites from the appropriation available for the purpose for which the land is to be used, when no suitable Government land is available. This authority is subject to an annual limitation of $50,000 Servicewide.

    3. Act of June 22, 1948, as amended (16 U.S.C. 577h). This Act authorizes appropriations for purchase and condemnation of lands in northern Minnesota.

    4. Department of Agriculture Organic Act of 1956 (7 U.S.C. 428a(a)). This Act provides the authority for acquisition of land by purchase, exchange, or otherwise, to carry out authorized work, provided that provision therefor is made in applicable appropriations. This is one of the primary authorities for acquisition of lands with Land and Water Conservation Fund moneys.

    5. Wilderness Act of 1964, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1121 note, 1131-1136). Sections 5 and 6 provide authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the wilderness system.

    6. Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of September 3, 1964, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 to 460l-11). This Act provides for deposit of funds to be used for the acquisition of lands and interests for recreation, threatened and endangered species habitat, preservation of wetlands, and other purposes.

    7. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1277). Sections 6 and 16 provide the authority for land acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the wild and scenic river system.

    8. National Trails System Act of 1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1241-1251). Sections 7 and 10 provide the authority for land acquisition, exchange, and donation of lands for inclusion in the National Trails System.

    9. Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1534 and 1542). Sections 5 and 15 provide the authority for acquisition of land for the protection of threatened and endangered species.

    10. Eastern Wilderness Act of 1975 (16 U.S.C. 1132 note). Sections 6 and 9 provide the authority for acquisition, exchange, and donation of land for inclusion in the Eastern Wilderness system.

    11. Act of October 10, 1978 (7 U.S.C. 2269). This Act provides the authority for the acceptance of donations of land or interests in land.

    12. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act of 1978 (92 Stat. 1654). Section 7(d)(3) provides the authority for funding the acquisition of lands and waters within the designated wilderness. Also, see 16 U.S.C. 577h cited in paragraph 3.

    13. Lake Tahoe Basin Act of 1980 (94 Stat. 3383). Section 3 provides the authority for land acquisition within the Lake Tahoe Basin.

    14. Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act of 1986 (16 U.S.C. 544g and 544n). Sections 9 and 16a of the Act provide the authority for land acquisition within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.

    40.5 - Definitions.

    Appropriated program funds. These funds include the National Forest System, Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, and Land Acquisition budget line items.

    Facilities construction project. Those activities that produce a fully functional, usable end-product as intended by design and in conformance with adopted standards, and which are in conformance with an approved facility master plan (FSM 7312 and FSH 7309.11, ch. 20). Examples for FA&O Construction are a completed office, a water system, or a combination of the two. Examples for Recreation Construction are a water system at a recreation site, additional campsites at an existing campground, or a complete campground facility with everything needed to make it fully functional.

    Facilities construction projects may be constructed in stages, such as additional wings or floors of buildings to better match available yearly funding levels. However, even if constructed in stages, they are still considered a single facility construction project.

    Minor facilities construction project. Those activities that produce a functionally complete project, as identified on an approved facility master plan, and whose direct construction costs payable from appropriated program funds (excluding planning and design costs), do not exceed $100,000. Examples include an office addition, a warehouse, a campground restroom, a utility system, or a research laboratory addition.

    A minor construction project does not include phased construction where one large project that is on the facility master plan is split into several small projects, and the total benefit to appropriated program funds is greater than $100,000. An example would be constructing or installing several smaller office "annexes" adjacent to an existing office, where the appropriated program funds contribution to the total cost of all the annexes exceeds $100,000.

    Using minor construction authority does not preclude constructing a project in separate stages, such as the foundation, framing, and electrical wiring, in 1 year or multiple years, as long as the total appropriated program funds contribution to the total project cost does not exceed the $100,000 limitation.

    41 - CONSTRUCTION (CNCN). The Construction appropriation is a definite, no-year, specific appropriation which has three budget line items: Construction of Facilities (sec. 41.1); Road Construction (sec. 41.2); and Trail Construction (sec. 41.3). This appropriation also identifies the authority for the timber purchaser road construction program limitation.

    Use these funds for:

    1. Construction, acquisition, restoration, and improvement of buildings, utility systems, dams, recreation facilities, and other facilities, and

    2. Construction and reconstruction of forest development roads and trails (including bridges) required for management, protection, and utilization of the National Forest System resources and for forest research.

    Land acquisition for administrative sites may be funded from this appropriation when it is a part of the total project cost. Do not use this appropriation for general administration charges, which are included under the National Forest System (NFS) appropriation.

    41.1 - Construction of Facilities. This budget line item (BLI), consists of the following expanded budget line items (EBLI): Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (sec. 41.11); Research Construction (sec. 41.12); and Recreation Construction (sec. 41.13). Use the Facilities Construction EBLI's for the construction of buildings and other facilities that support the Forest Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, Land Acquisition, and National Forest System programs. Such facilities include real property and/or capital investments, as well as those portable structures (trailers and modular units) that become an integral part of an administrative site. See section 40.5 for the definition of a construction project.

    This BLI includes recreation area development; water, sanitation, and electrical systems; administrative site acquisition and development; construction of offices, service and storage buildings, housing, nursery buildings, lookouts, and research laboratories; aircraft fields, service and other support facilities; and construction of dams. Facility construction includes major betterment, restoration, and relocation not classified as maintenance or repair.

    Do not charge Facility Construction for resource development projects which are an integral part of normal operating and research programs, or for temporary or emergency structures. Examples of these excluded items are: range fences, ponds for wildlife and range purposes, fish ladders, stream improvements, temporary landing strips or heliports for emergency fire situations, and the portions of nursery development or expansion discussed under nursery construction. Finance such development projects from the benefiting programs of which they are an integral part.

    41.11 - Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (CNFA). Use the following guidelines for determining the financing for Fire, Administrative, and Other Construction (FA&O) improvements:

    1. Offices and Administrative Dwellings. Finance construction of offices and administrative dwellings at District, Forest, and Regional office administrative sites from CNFA, and work activity LF22 (FA&O).

    2. Barracks, Dormitories, and Messhalls. Finance construction of barracks, dormitories, and messhalls from CNFA, and work activity LF22 (FA&O). When use of the facility is expected to be fairly consistent over at least a 3-year period, and will benefit programs other than appropriated program funds, then the project may be financed from the benefiting funds or multi-financed.

    3. Other Buildings. Finance the construction of warehouses, storage buildings, utility buildings, and so forth, from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate amount of space needed in the building by each program.

    4. Utility Systems. Finance construction or replacement of sewer systems, water systems, electrical systems, and so forth, on the same basis as the improvement(s) served.

    5. Other Related Structures. Finance construction of fences, site service roads, sidewalks, and similar improvements on the same basis as the improvement(s) served.

    6. Seaplane and Boat Docks. Finance seaplane and boat docks from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate need of the programs requiring the dock. Do not consider incidental use by other activities resulting from the existence of the dock when financing.

    7. Airports, Heliports, and Airfields. Facility construction funds are available to build or purchase facilities for protection of the National Forest System from wildfires including construction, improvement, and acquisition of airports and structures thereon, heliports, lookouts, airfields, and helispots. Finance such structures from CNFA and/or other benefiting appropriations, such as K-V, Brush Disposal, or the Salvage Sale Fund on the basis of the proportionate need of each program. Charge temporary facilities built for suppression of a going wildfire to the emergency firefighting fund (EFFS).

    8. Nurseries. Use CNFA funds to construct new tree nurseries or to expand existing nurseries, including the construction of service, storage, dwelling, office, greenhouse, and other buildings plus equipment which is an integral part of buildings, such as sewer, electrical, and water systems, including underground irrigation systems. Exclude the following items from Construction appropriation funding and fund these from benefiting funds: seed bed development (including land preparation), surface and subsurface drainage, above ground irrigation, perimeter fences, and personal property equipment within buildings.

      Construction of buildings devoted primarily to the Cooperative Work-KV (K-V) program, such as a tree cooler, may be charged to K-V. See FSH 2409.19, Knutson - Vandenberg (K-V) Fund Handbook, section 16.7, for guidance on the use of K-V funds for facilities construction.

      Replacement of buildings capitalized in the Working Capital Fund (WCF), may be funded from the WCF (FSH 6509.11f).
    1. Other Construction. Use CNFA for the construction of other general purpose buildings and facilities classified as capital assets that are not specifically mentioned in this section.

    41.12 - Research Construction (CNRE). Finance the construction of Research facilities from CNRE, and the Research Construction work activity (LR). Use these funds for the construction, improvement, and acquisition of all research purpose buildings and structures, including offices and residences. Funds are appropriated and allocated on a project basis. Charge energy retrofit activities benefiting these research facilities to this activity also.

    41.13 - Recreation Construction (CNRF). Finance the construction and reconstruction of recreation facilities from CNRF, and the Recreation Resource Improvement Construction work activity (AN22). Use these funds for addition and replacement of facilities at existing recreation sites and for new recreation construction projects. Recreation projects include visitor interpretive centers, campgrounds, picnic grounds, boat landings, swimming sites, and so forth.

    41.14 - Minor Facility Construction. Any benefiting program fund (or combination of funds) may be used in lieu of facility construction funds to finance the acquisition or construction of research, recreation, fire, administrative, and other buildings and structures when the estimated cost to be financed from appropriated program funds is less than $100,000 (exclusive of planning and design costs). See section 40.5 for the definition of appropriated program funds.

    Total construction costs can exceed $100,000 and still qualify as minor construction as long as the portion to be funded from appropriated program funds is under $100,000. An example would be a cooler for storing tree seedlings that is expected to cost $125,000, to be shared by National Forest System (NFS) - Reforestation ($40,000), Knutson-Vandenberg Trust Fund ($65,000), and Reforestation Trust Fund ($20,000). In this example, the appropriated program funds portion (NFS) is less than $100,000.

    Document cost and distribution estimates to show that all data utilized in the estimate were reasonable and that all cost items and benefits which were known or which reasonably should have been known at the time were included in the estimate.

    41.15 - Multi-Fund Financing. The acquisition of administrative sites and the acquisition or construction of facilities may be multi-financed from a combination of funds as follows:

    1. Partial Financing from Facility Construction Funds. Facility Construction funds may be combined with permanent and trust funds, such as Knutson-Vandenberg (CWKV), Salvage Sale (SSSS), Brush Disposal (BDBD), Cooperative Work-Other (CWFS), or Donated (GBGB) funds. These are all specific funds available for specific purposes.

      Use of K-V, BD, and SS funds are subject to the following conditions:

      1. To the extent such construction was provided for in the related timber sale appraisals.

      2. To the extent that the work remaining to be completed on timber sales will benefit from the facilities to be constructed.

    2. No Financing from Facility Construction Funds. Any available benefiting funds, up to a total of $100,000 from the following appropriations may be used in combination with partnership contributions, other agency appropriations, or permanent and trust funds to finance construction and reconstruction projects in direct proportion to the benefits to each program: Research (R), State and Private Forestry (S&PF), National Forest System (NFS), Forest Service Fire Protection (FP), or Land Acquisition (LA). Do not mix Facility Construction funds with these appropriated program funds.

      Road and trail construction funds may contribute to minor construction projects when the forest road program or the forest trail program receives benefit from the construction.

    3. Financing From the Working Capital Fund. Limit financing of buildings and structures from the Working Capital Fund (WCF) to replacement of those already capitalized in the WCF and then only with prior approval of the Washington Office Director of Fiscal and Accounting Services. However, Washington Office approval is not required for minor buildings, such as gas and oil houses. The local WCF financial manager shall approve financing for such minor buildings.

    4. Determining Appropriation Responsibility. Make a written record in the file for each building project to determine and justify appropriation responsibility. Prepare a sound plan to support the amount of each appropriation used to finance the construction project. As a basic principle, pay construction costs of structures from the appropriations that primarily require use of the structure. When a structure is needed to serve two or more appropriations, distribute the cost to those appropriations in proportion to the benefits.

      Use the most recent employees' salary financing plan as a basis for distributing building construction costs if the current plan reasonably represents the anticipated program for the next 3 years. Use full-time equivalent (FTE) staff years of employment rather than salary costs as the basis for distribution.

      In most cases it is difficult to forecast material changes in a program for succeeding years; therefore, determine whether any current programs are temporary with planned elimination or significant curtailment within the following 3 years. For example, if the annual work and financial plans include an emergency insect control project, exclude the FTE's associated with this project when determining distribution of building costs for permanent-type structures. Give similar consideration to amounts included in current financial plans for major nonrecurring road and other construction projects.

      Where the use by a benefiting appropriation is infrequent or incidental (5 percent or less), do not consider the appropriation in financing construction.


    5. Exhibits. Exhibits 01 through 03 provide guidelines on the use of funds for facility construction.

      a. Exhibit 01 - Guidelines for Financing Facility Construction. This exhibit shows the allowable funding mixes for different kinds of facility construction projects.

      b. Exhibit 02 - Decision Chart for Financing Facility Construction. This exhibit presents a decision-making aid for determining allowable funding mixes for facility construction projects under different conditions.

      c. Exhibit 03 - Sample Determination of Funding Responsibility for a Staff Barracks.


    41.15 - Exhibit 01

    Guidelines for Financing Facility Construction


    Constr.
    Appn.1/
    NFS,S&PF,
    Research and Fire
    Protection
    Permanent
    and Trust
    Funds 2/
    Partnership
    or Transfer
    Funds
    Offices and Primary
    Staff Dwellings at All
    Headquarter Locations
    Yes Yes 3/ No Yes
    All Other Facilities 4/

    Minor Construction:
     No Construction
    Appn. funding
    No Yes 3/ Yes Yes
     Construction
    Appn. funding
    requested
    Yes No Yes Yes
    Other Than Minor Yes No Yes Yes


      1/ Facilities Construction supports the Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, Land Acquisition, and National Forest System appropriations.

      2/ Permanent and Trust funds include Cooperative Work-KV (KV), Salvage Sales (SS), Brush Disposal (BD), Cooperative Work-Other, and Gifts. The KV, SS, and BD plans should provide for costs of needed facilities. (See section 16.7 of FSH 2409.19, Renewable Resource Uses for Knutson-Vandenberg (K-V) Fund Handbook for required approvals for construction of facilities with K-V Funds.) Permanent and Trust Funds are not available for general administrative facility construction.

      3/ Research, State and Private Forestry, Forest Service Fire Protection, and National Forest System funds can be used as long as their cumulative share is under $100,000 and no Facilities Construction funds are involved.

      4/ If other programs besides those supported by the Construction appropriation are expected to benefit over a period of at least 3 years, the project may be multi-financed on the basis of salary financial plans and staff years of employment in each program area.


    41.15 - Exhibit 02

    Decision Chart for Financing Facility Construction

    Estimated cost
    $100,000+
    Estimated cost
    Under $100,000
    Will the construction benefit
    Forest Service appropriated
    fund programs? 1/
    Yes
     |
    \/No----->
    Use Option 1 Use Option 1
    Will other programs also benefit?
    Yes
     |
    \/ No ----->
    Use Option 2 Use Option 2
    or Option 3
    Is benefit to Forest Service
    appropriated fund programs
    over $100,00?

    Yes
     |
    \/ 
    No-----> Use Option 4
    or Option 5
    Use Option 4
    or Option 5
    Yes-------------------------------------> Use Option 4
    or Option 5
     N/A


    1/ See section 40.5 for the definition of appropriated program funds.



    41.15 - Exhibit 02 --Continued

    Financing Options for Facility Construction

    Option 1 - Use one or more funds that are available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation, such as Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds, when available and justified. No Facility Construction funds are involved.

    Option 2 - Use the Construction appropriation (regardless of cost) when requested and approved by Congress.

    Option 3 - Use a combination of Forest Service appropriated program funds (NFS, Research, S&PF, Fire Protection, and Land Acquisition). Total estimated cost, excluding planning and design, may not exceed $100,000.

    Option 4 - Use a combination of funds appropriated for facilities construction and other funds available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation, (Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds). Construction appropriation funds must be approved by Congress.

    Option 5 - Use a combination of Forest Service appropriated program funds (NFS, Research, S&PF, Fire Protection, and/or Land Acquisition) and other funds available to the Forest Service without direct appropriation (Cooperative Work-KV, Brush Disposal, Salvage Sale, Contributed funds, and/or other agency transfer funds). Total cost financed by Forest Service appropriated program funds may not exceed $100,000. No Facility Construction funds are involved.


    41.15 - Exhibit 03

    Sample Determination of Funding

    Responsibility for a Staff Barrack

    Assume that a 20-staff barracks is to be constructed at a work center for use of project crews financed by several appropriations.

    Insect and Disease Suppression personnel will use it for the current season only (a nonrecurrent project). Determine the basis as follows:

    Appropriation Current Salary
    Budget
    (Staff Years)
     (Percent)
    Construction
    Cost
    Distribution
    SPFS  1/
    CNFA 40 $60,000 2/
    CWKV 20 30,000 3/
    BDBD 20 30,000 3/
    SSSS 20 30,000 3/
    TOTAL 100% $150,000


      1/ Insect and Disease Suppression is eliminated in the distribution since its use is non-recurrent. Incidental use (less than 5 percent) should also be excluded.

      2/ The Facility Construction share would have to be requested and approved by Congress. (If not requested in the budget, this share would qualify for financing from project funds in lieu of Construction because the appropriated program fund portion is under $100,000).

      3/ As planned and funded in sale area improvement, fuel treatment, and salvage sale plans.

      NOTE: The same principle should be used to determine the multi-appropriation financing of mess halls or other buildings used by a number of employees.


    41.2 - Road Construction. Use this budget line item within the Construction appropriation for the construction and reconstruction of transportation facilities on the National Forest transportation system. Charge all costs of this work to one of the following internal budget line items:

    1. Recreation Roads (CNRN). Road construction funding used primarily to support the recreation program.

    2. Timber Roads (CNTM). Road construction funding primarily used to support the timber management program.

    3. General Purpose Roads (CNGP). Road construction funding not primarily used to support timber or recreation, but used to more evenly support all resource and administrative programs.

    41.21 - Appropriate Uses. Use road construction funds for:

      1. Activities in support of the construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities, and the purchase of rights-of-way. These activities include program administration, administrative support, transportation planning, interdisciplinary and ecological coordination, preconstruction engineering, and construction engineering. These activities support the Forest Road Program (FRP), the Purchaser Credit Program (PCP), and the Purchaser Election Program (PEP).

      2. Actual construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities, including roads, bridges, culverts, log transfer facilities, and so forth, and for the purchase of rights-of-way for forest development roads. Construction and reconstruction of forest development transportation facilities include, but are not limited to, the following activities on or related to Forest Development Roads:

        1. Construction or reconstruction of roads leading to and within recreation areas and administrative sites, except where such costs have been included as part of the facility construction cost and budgeted from facility construction funds.

        2. Construction or reconstruction of parking areas in or adjacent to administrative sites, and parking areas and parking spurs, loops, and turnouts in or adjacent to recreation areas, except where such costs have been budgeted as part of the cost of the facility. (This excludes vehicle storage areas, and paved areas, sidewalks, and courts around and between buildings.)

        3. Augmentation of specified road construction or reconstruction in timber sale contracts as either contributed or supplemental funds.

        4. Construction or reconstruction of adjacent vehicular parking areas, and sanitary, water, and fire control facilities where needed for the safety and comfort of persons using the roads and when the costs are nominal (23 U.S.C. 205(d)).

        5. Acquisition and installation of regulatory, warning, and guide signs, and other traffic control devices when part of a road construction or reconstruction project.

        6. Construction or reconstruction of safety devices such as guardrails, object markers, delineators, and barriers.

        7. Construction or reconstruction of fences and cattle guards within the right-of-way to the extent required by law or to exclude stock from the roadway or from fenced areas cut by the roads.

        8. Removal or relocation of Forest Service utilities such as telephone poles and wires when necessitated by road construction or reconstruction. (The Forest Service has no authority to pay for the relocation or removal of private utilities from this appropriation, even if the planned activities of the Forest Service require the work. See Comptroller General's Decision A-38299, dated September 3, 1931 (Comp. Gen. A-38299); Title 23, United States Code, section 123 (23 U.S.C. 123); and Comptroller General's Decisions, volume 36, page 23 (36 Comp. Gen. 23), and volume 44, page 59 (44 Comp. Gen. 59), and decisions cited therein regarding exceptions and clarifications.)

        9. Construction or reconstruction of single purpose buildings, structures, and improvements used for servicing the forest development road program, when the total cost is less than $100,000.

        10. Disposal of slash created by road construction or reconstruction.

        11. Restoration of borrow pits and quarries used in road construction or reconstruction based on rehabilitation plans.

        12. Establishment of geodetic markers in accordance with specifications of Coast and Geodetic Survey, required for road construction or reconstruction activities; also, re-establishment of land line markings that would be disturbed by road construction or reconstruction.

        13. Payment of excess construction cost as provided for under cost share agreements.

        14. Obliteration of sections of road abandoned as part of re-alignment during a road reconstruction project.

        15. Mitigation of effects on historic or pre-historic properties discovered when planning, locating, constructing, or reconstructing a road.

    41.22 - Prohibited Work. Do not use Road construction funds to:

    1. Obliterate or return a road site to a near natural state (53 Comp. Gen. 328)

    2. Remove snow, except in emergency situations for protection of life and property or for official travel of road construction crews to and from work site.

    3. Construct or reconstruct docks and launching ramps for boats for recreation purposes.

    4. Construct or reconstruct temporary roads for emergency use such as insect control, flood, or fire suppression. These emergency roads should be financed from funds of the program that requires their construction.

    41.3 - Trail Construction (CNTR). Use this budget line item within the Construction appropriation for the construction and reconstruction of trails on the National Forest System including trails designated or to be designated on the National Trail System when administered by the Forest Service.

    41.4 - Timber Purchaser Road Construction Limitation. The Construction appropriation language includes an annual obligation limitation for construction of forest development roads by timber purchasers. This unfunded limitation is in lieu of direct appropriations and continues until used.

    Use this authorization, through credits to the timber sale accounts of timber purchasers, to finance only those forest development roads constructed or reconstructed under the terms and conditions of timber sale contracts and only to a standard necessary to harvest and remove the timber and other products covered by the particular sales. Do not use this authority to construct roads to a higher standard than needed to harvest and remove timber and other forest products covered by the particular sale. Charge the appropriate road construction internal budget line item for any such additional higher cost.

    41.5 - Watershed Restoration (CNWR). Use CNWR funds for road projects (such as road closure, obliteration, revegetation and drainage improvements), and for watershed projects (such as riparian revegetation, erosion control, and slide stabilization), in connection with the comprehensive restoration of key watersheds on the westside forests of Washington, Oregon, and northern California for which the appropriate watershed inventory and analysis have been completed. (Charge the inventories and analyses to funds provided under Salvage Sales.) Place priority on projects with the greatest impact on factors limiting salmon spawning, rearing and holding habitat, and projects with the greatest long-term positive impact.

    42 - LAND ACQUISITION - LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND (LALA). Funds are appropriated annually from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, but are no-year appropriations to the Forest Service for acquisition of land pursuant to the Land and Water Conservation Act, as amended, and other land acquisition authorities of the Forest Service (sec. 40.12).

    42.1 - Land Purchases (LALW). Charge LALW for:

    1. The actual cost of land purchased and

    2. Cash equalization payments for those exchanges that would otherwise qualify for purchase using Land and Water Conservation Fund money.

    42.2 - Acquisition Management (LALW). Charge LALW with the cost of planning and processing acquisition cases, including those exchanges that would otherwise qualify for purchase using Land and Water Conservation Fund money.

    43 - LAND ACQUISITION - SPECIAL ACTS (ACAC). This is a special fund appropriation to the Forest Service. Funds are appropriated annually from forest receipts from the occupancy of public land or from the sale of natural resources other than minerals. Receipts appropriated for land purchase are exempted from the provisions of Title 16, United States Code, sections 500 and 501 (Payments to States and road construction). All funds appropriated that remain unobligated at the end of the fiscal year are returned to the receipts of the affected national forests.

    Use these funds to purchase land and for related expenditures such as title search, escrow, recording, and personnel costs when the purchase is considered necessary to minimize soil erosion and flood damage. See additional purposes under Toiyabe National Forest (para. 3). Limit expenditures for each National Forest to amounts allocated and receipts actually available. See other restrictions under each authority cited in paragraphs 1 - 3. This appropriation is available for land acquisition within the exterior boundaries of the following national forests:

    1. Cache National Forest, Utah, Act of May 11, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 227). Funds are restricted to the purchase of lands in the State of Utah. Appropriation of receipts for land purchase shall have no effect on payments to the State of Wyoming.

    2. Uinta and Wasatch National Forests, Utah, Act of August 26, 1935, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 227). Funds are restricted to the purchase of lands in the State of Utah within the boundaries of the Uinta and Wasatch National Forests. Appropriation of receipts for land purchase shall have no effect on payments to the State of Idaho. In order to maintain the integrity of the distribution of receipts between the States of Utah and Idaho, any funds appropriated from the receipts of either forest may only be used to purchase land on the same national forest.

    3. Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada, Act of June 25, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 228). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in the State of Nevada, not to exceed $10,000 per annum. The Act contains no restriction as to the effect on payments to the State of California. Therefore, any funds from the whole forest are available up to the stated limit. In addition to purchasing land to minimize soil erosion and flood damage, this fund may also be used to purchase land to promote efficiency and economy of administration.

    4. Angeles National Forest, California, Act of June 11, 1940 (54 Stat. 299). Funds are available for purchase of lands within the boundary of the Angeles National Forest.

    5. Cleveland National Forest, California, Act of June 11, 1940 (54 Stat. 297). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in San Diego County, California. Funds shall be derived from the portion of receipts of the Cleveland National Forest which are equal to the proportion of the area of the forest that is in the county of San Diego.

    6. San Bernardino and Cleveland National Forests, California, Act of June 15, 1938, as amended by the Act of May 26, 1944 (58 Stat. 228). Funds are restricted to the purchase of land in Riverside County, California. Funds shall be derived from the portions of receipts of the San Bernardino and Cleveland National Forests which are equal to the proportion of the area of each national forest that is in the county of Riverside.

    7. Sequoia National Forest, California, Act of June 17, 1940 (54 Stat. 402). Funds are available for purchase of lands within the boundary of the Sequoia National Forest.

    44 - LAND ACQUISITION FOR EXCHANGES (EXEX). This indefinite, no-year appropriation is authorized by the Act of December 4, 1967, as amended (16 U.S.C. 484a). All deposits received during the fiscal year are made available by the annual Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation Act. The authorizing legislation provides for cash deposits of a portion or all of the value of the selected lands in exchange cases with States, local governments, and public school districts or other public school authority, to be used to purchase similar lands.

    Collections deposited in the special receipt account are made available by annual appropriation to meet specific land acquisition needs. Lands acquired with these funds must be in the same State and must have the same status as the selected lands involved in the exchange. Identify each collection and expenditure by the class of land and the State in which the selected lands are located.

    45 - OTHER SPECIAL LAND ACQUISITION FUNDS. This section represents land acquisition funds under prior year appropriations that are continuing or from special one time laws passed to purchase specific tracts, such as Klamath Land Acquisition (KLKL) and Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area land acquisition (CLCL).

  • 7310.4 - Responsibility.

    7310.41 - Washington Office.

    7310.41a - Deputy Chief for Research. It is the responsibility of the Deputy Chief for Research to:

    1. Provide Service-wide guidelines for development of the research-related construction and maintenance program and to coordinate development through the budget process.

    2. Review and approve the prospectus for constructing any research facility having a value of $250,000 or more.

    7310.41b - Director, Engineering. It is the responsibility of the Director of Engineering to:

    1. Provide overall technical direction for planning, development, design, construction, operation, utilization, maintenance, and management of all buildings and related facilities owned, occupied, or permitted by the Forest Service.

    2. Develop service-wide standards to ensure a safe, cost-effective, efficient physical plant for Forest Service activities.

    3. Provide service-wide facility objectives and recommend program levels to the Chief after coordination with appropriate functional and program staff.

    4. Provide service-wide guidelines for Fire, Administrative, and Other (FA&O) construction and maintenance program activities and coordinate development through facility location (FSM 1241), unit standards (FSM 1243), and the budget process.

    5. Approve engineering reports on all proposals for purchase, exchange, or donation of existing buildings or related facilities with an estimated value of $250,000 or more which were specifically acquired for occupancy by the Forest Service.

    6. Process project requests that exceed Office of Management and Budget and congressional construction limitations on cost and design of new employee housing.

    7310.41c - Director, Human Resource Programs. It is the responsibility of the Director of Human Resources to:

    1. Coordinate the acquisition and development of facilities and related structures to meet human resource program requirements.

    2. Provide the name of the interagency contact for specific building requirements, planning, programing, and management for human resource program facilities.

    7310.41d - Director, Lands. It is the responsibility of the Director of Lands to:

    1. Provide technical leadership for the landownership program, including leadership in the purchase, exchange, or donation of lands and buildings.

    2. Coordinate reviews and actions pursuant to purchase, exchange, or donation of undeveloped administrative and research sites exceeding $25,000 and all sites with completed buildings having a value of $250,000 or more, and forward such proposals to the Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Administration. The Assistant Secretary for Administration has the authority to approve such purchases or donations (FSM 5404). Initiate no action, other than conducting an appraisal where needed, prior to the Assistant Secretary's approval.

    3. Review and approve land as excess to Forest Service needs (FSM 5404.13b).

    7310.41e - Director, Personnel and Civil Rights. It is the responsibility of the Director of Personnel and Civil Rights to:

    1. Ensure that (1) mandated and adopted safety and health safeguards for buildings and related facilities are considered in design, occupancy, and inspection and (2) necessary remedial actions are accomplished.

    2. Ensure that service-wide organizational responsibilities and standards are considered in requests for facilities involving organization adjustments and boundary and location changes.

    7310.41f - Director, Procurement and Property. It is the responsibility of the Director of Procurement and Property to:

    1. Delegate specific authority to named contracting and leasing officers and provide Service-wide leadership in leasing and construction contracting activities.

    2. Dispose of, or arrange for the disposal of, excess real property in accordance with Federal Property Management Regulations (FSH 6409.31 - FPMR), after approval by the Director of Lands (FSM 5404.13b).

    7310.41g - Director, Recreation, Cultural Resources and Wilderness Management. It is the responsibility of the Director of Recreation, Cultural Resources and Wilderness Management to:

    1. Provide service-wide guidelines for development of the recreation construction and maintenance program and to coordinate development through the budget process.

    2. Coordinate service-wide direction for specialized buildings, structures, interpretive interior design, and program requirements for interpretive services and recreation programs.

    3. Review all proposals and preliminary drawings for interpretive service buildings or related facilities with an estimated value of $250,000 or more and intended for Forest Service occupancy.

    4. Provide Service-wide guidelines for site planning and location of all buildings and service facilities, such as driveways, walks, and parking areas.

    7310.42 - Regional Foresters, Station Directors, and Area Director. It is the responsibility of the Regional Foresters, Station Directors, and the Area Director to:

    1. Alter, repair, construct, and purchase buildings and related facilities within their respective areas of responsibility as follows:

      1. Review and approve any purchase, exchange, or donation of existing buildings or related facilities intended for Forest Service occupancy, subject to any required approval, review, or concurrence by the Washington Office, Secretary of Agriculture, and Congressional oversight committees.

      2. Submit acquisition proposals for employee quarters that exceed Office of Management and Budget and congressional limitation on employee housing to Chief and/or Staff to review and process for Appropriations Committee approval.

    2. Acquire space by lease, using qualified leasing officers with appropriate delegated authority, in cases where acquisition of such space meets the objectives of the Forest Service and was considered in preliminary project analysis (FSM 7312.2).

    3. Review and approve site development plans, building designs, and construction proposals for all buildings, owned or authorized by the Forest Service and, subject to limitations contained in FSM 5404, approve acquisition of buildings. This responsibility may be redelegated.

    4. Manage activities, including planning, programing, design, construction, leasing operation, safety and health, and maintenance associated with government-owned and leased facilities. Station Directors shall maintain facilities inventories for their units (FSM 7312.5, FSH 7309.11, ch. 60).

    5. Regional Foresters shall provide needed engineering, architectural, and other staff assistance, such as cultural resources, interpretive services, landscape architecture, and training, to Forest Supervisors in formulating project proposals; preparing designs, working drawings, specifications, and cost estimates; and providing construction administration. Regional Foresters, Station Directors, and the Area Director may collaborate to provide similar services for Area and Station buildings.

    6. Provide training to ensure that facilities personnel meet skill requirements as provided in Engineering Management publication EM-7310-6, "Facilities Management Skill Requirements".

    7310.43 - Forest Supervisors. It is the responsibility of the Forest Supervisors to:

    1. Provide planning and program information for buildings and related facilities to support the unit's mission consistent with forest plans.

    2. Conduct preliminary analyses on all facilities to be acquired.

    3. Conduct site planning for all administrative sites.

    4. Provide construction engineering, landscape construction, and general facilities engineering and management of all Forest Service-owned and -occupied buildings, building equipment, or space used by the unit.

    5. Administer all special-use facilities authorized on the unit.

    6. Maintain inventories of facilities as directed in FSM 7312.5 and FSH 7309.11, chapter 60.

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