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Engineering > Facilities

Facilities


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The Forest Service uses a wide variety of buildings to help accomplish its mission. Offices, warehouses, research laboratories, visitor centers, houses, dormitories, and shower buildings are a few of the buildings the public might see in our National Forests. Many buildings are small, but some of the research laboratories and visitor centers we build are quite large. Though we construct only a few buildings each year, several of our buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. Many of these buildings date from the early days of settlement in the western parts of the United States; others were built by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) over 50 years ago. If buildings were people, one of every three Forest Service buildings could qualify for retirement!

Renewable energy technology is used wherever it is cost-effective. For example, solar hot water heating and photovoltaic panels are being used more than ever before to help reduce costs and to save nonrenewable energy sources.

Today's facilities engineers continue to uphold a long-standing Forest Service tradition of efficient, durable, ecologically responsible development.

 

Example of a newer building

Demonstrating the Forest Service commitment to progressive engineering, all new Forest Service offices over 10,000 square feet in size are certified by a green building rating system, such as LEED or Green Globes . The Detroit Ranger Station office of the Willamette National Forest (Oregon) in the Pacific Northwest Region, shown at right, is an example of a structure that fits its setting in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and incorporates sustainable design features.  For example, the clerestory windows provide plenty of daylight to the offices, so that electric lighting is not needed on many days.



Photo of a new building.
 
 

Example of an historic facility

The Ranger's Office building at the Tellico Ranger Station of the Cherokee National Forest (Tennessee) in the Southern Region, shown at right, is part of a completely preserved Civilian Conservation Corps period (1933-1942) complex.  It was rehabilitated in 1996.  Tellico is a working Ranger Station that is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.


Photo of an historic facility.
 
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Facilities-related documents:

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U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service United States Department of Agriculture