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Jim Meade

Jim Meade has volunteered at the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center in Great Falls, Montana for over 16 years, contributing over 7,000 hours!  He provides interpretive services, acts as a docent, along with many other services.  Jim has received the 2014 Enduring Service Award, for giving significant time and talent over many years to the Forest Service.  See other awardees for the annual award program here.

A photo of 2014 Enduring Service Awardee volunteer Jim Meade teaching a young boy how to string poles.

Why should I volunteer?

Your interests and experiences can help with just about any aspect of the agency’s work except law enforcement and firefighting. You will become part of an army of more than 2.8 million volunteers who, since 1972, have provided more than 123 million hours of service that is valued at about $1.4 billion. Volunteering provides you a great opportunity to:

  • Give back to your community
  • Improve Forests and Grasslands
  • Learn about natural and cultural conservation
  • Meet new people and form friendships

Volunteers may also earn an America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass and be recognized nationally or locally.

Carmen Young, a MobilizeGreen intern, volunteered in the People’s Garden at the Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC.

Who can volunteer?

  • Anyone can volunteer - minors need parental consent
  • Churches, schools, community organizations, friends groups, businesses, or any other group
  • International visitors - find out more about the International Visitor Program

What can volunteers do?

Volunteer activities can be tailored to your specific talents and interest or you can take advantage of opportunities to learn new skills.

  • Help manage campgrounds
  • Interact with the public at visitor centers
  • Help run events and lead projects, like National Public Lands Day
  • Build trails
  • Inventory wildlife and plants
  • Serve as fire lookouts
  • And much more 

Volunteers annually contribute thousands of hours of work on the Manti-La Sal National Forest.

How do I get started?

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