Home >> Working With Us >> Committees

Committees

Citizens help us in our mission

Citizens involvement is important to the work we do. There are a variety of ways the public can become involved in how we do our work. At least two are covered under advisory committee laws: Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1967 and the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act of 2004. Advisory committees, with members from nearly every occupational and industry group and geographic location, have played an important role in the accomplishment of the Forest Service mission.

The Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee meets to discuss issues on the Olympic National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service)

When does the law apply?

Federal agencies have a broad array of ways to consult with the public, including public meetings, forums, certain work products and meeting initiated by partners. The are not covered by the act.

The law applies when we establish, use, control or manage a group with non-federal members that provide the agency with consensus advice or recommendations.

Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972


How long do committee members serve?

A committee automatically ends after two years unless the statutory authority used to establish the committee provides a different duration.


How can I serve on a committee?

Selection of committee members is made based on the requirements of the agency and on the potential member's background and qualifications. Some members are subject to criminal conflict of interest laws, regulatory standards of ethical conduct, financial disclosure requirements, and other Federal ethics rules. Some committee membership requirements are based on geographic location.

 If the agency determines that a committee covered under the act, often referred to as FACA,  public notice must be posted on the Federal Register. View agency committee notices.

Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act of 2004


When does the law apply?

The law gives the Secretaries of Agriculture and Interior the authority to establish, modify, charge and collect recreation fees on federal lands. The law also requires they establish Recreation Resource Advisory Committees. These committees are covered under the Federal Advisory Committees law.


What do the committees do?

The committees, often referred to as RACs, provide recommendations on recreation fee proposals managed by the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. BLM uses Resource Advisory Councils. For efficiency, the Forest Service and BLM agreed to allow both agencies to use the other agency’s existing advisory groups where appropriate.


How can I serve on a committee?

Selection of committee members is made based on the requirements of the agency and on the potential member's background and qualifications. Some members are subject to criminal conflict of interest laws, regulatory standards of ethical conduct, financial disclosure requirements, and other Federal ethics rules. Some committee membership requirements are based on geographic location.

See a list of Forest Service and BLM committees

Back to Top