Southern Region Viewing Area

LOCATION and PHOTOS

young, regenerating long-leaf pine savanna with the typical grass-forb community.
A young, regenerating long-leaf pine savanna with the typical grass-forb community at the surface. Photo by National Forests & Grasslands in Texas.

small pitcher plant bog.
A small pitcher plant bog. Please always view bogs from the edge and do not travel into them. Pitcher plant bog communities are sensitive to disturbance caused by humans. Photo by National Forests & Grasslands in Texas.

blue curls.
Blue curls, one of a number of beautiful wildflowers visitors may find in the spring. Photo by T.G. Barnes.

soft green eyes being pollinated by beetles.
Soft green eyes being pollinated by beetles. Photo by G.A. Cooper, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

Boykin Springs

Forest: National Forests & Grasslands in Texas

District: Angelina National Forest

Description: Located on Boykin Springs Lake, this recreation area offers a little of everything including camping, hiking, fishing, picnicking, or just getting back in touch with nature. Visitors can hike the Sawmill Hiking Trail, a 5.5 mile trail, to Bouton Lake. When visiting Boykin Springs, hikers and naturalists alike will enjoy the very high quality open park-like stands of dry upland longleaf pine savanna. According to some visitors, this area has been called the finest quality remnant of a fire-maintained, old growth, species rich, dry upland longleaf pine savanna in the West Gulf Coastal Plain. Some areas of this longleaf pine savanna lack any noticeable post settlement disturbances of Euro-American origin. Visitors to Boykin Springs must pay a day use fee of $3.00.

Wildflower viewing: Landscape diversity is high, with habitats ranging from hillside seepage bogs, graminoid seeps, and broadleaf evergreen seep forests to sand hill woodlands and barrens. The high quality plant communities and species diversity make this one of the most outstanding sites in the National Forests in Texas and they are of regional ecological significance. Some of the myriad of wildflowers one may see include rough leaf sunflower (Rudbeckia scabrifolia), milkworts (Polygala mariana), sawtooth nerveray (Tetragonotheca ludoviciana), coreopsis (Coreopsis tinctoria), puccoon (Lithospermum caroliniense), wooly-white (Hymenopappus artemisiaefolius), feathery dalea (Dalea villosa), loose-leaf penstemon (Penstemon laxiflorus), blue curls (Trichostema setaceum), hairy sunflower (Helianthus mollis), soft green eyes (Berlandiera pumila), coral bean (Erythrina herbacea), and slender gayfeather (Liatris tenuis). With a great diversity of natural habitats there are always new wildflowers in bloom right up until the flowering season comes to a halt. The high quality plant communities and species diversity make this one of the most outstanding sites in the National Forests in Texas and of regional ecological significance.

Safety First: Boykin Springs has well developed trails and camping areas, however those of you who wish to venture off the beaten path may want to watch for a variety of hazards. Be watchful for things that can bite you, sting you, or give you a rash. There are several species of poisonous snakes in the area, although they are not common, as well as the possibilities for tick and mosquito bites. Make sure you wear protective clothing and use repellent whenever possible. There are also several different species on poisonous plants occurring here, including poison ivy and poison sumac. Learn how to identify these plants and DON’T TOUCH! If you do come into contact with these plants make sure to wash the area as soon as possible thoroughly. Be watchful for stump holes on the ground below you and hanging limbs from trees above you. A nice day in the woods can be very enjoyable as long as we keep these safety issues in mind and always remember “Safety First”.

Directions: Texas Highway 63 east from Zavalla for 10.5 miles; turn right (south), on Forest Service Road 313 for 2.5 miles to campground.

Ownership and Management: U.S. Forest Service, National Forests & Grasslands in Texas, Angelina National Forest.

Closest Town: Zavalla, Texas.

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