Intermountain Region Viewing Area

LOCATION and PHOTOS

Thumnbail map and directions to the Viewing Area.

blue flax (Linum lewisii) and Cinquefoil (Potentilla gracilis) dominate the foreground near the Granite Highline trailhead.
Blue flax (Linum lewisii) and Cinquefoil (Potentilla gracilis) dominate the foreground near the Granite Highline trailhead. Photo by: Susan Marsh, Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Mountain hollyhock (Iliamna rivularis) in a recent burn above the Granite Creek Road.
Mountain hollyhock (Iliamna rivularis) in a recent burn above the Granite Creek Road. Photo by: Susan Marsh, Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Granite Creek

Forest: Bridger-Teton National Forest

District: Jackson Ranger District

Description: Granite Creek is known for its scenic views of the southern Gros Ventre Range, the creek itself, and lush surrounding foothills. The nine-mile gravel road is usually open and dry by mid-June, which is the start of the wildflower season. Lower elevation sagebrush-grasslands feature showy arrowleaf balasamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) mixed with low larkspur (Delphinium bicolor), sticky geranium (Geranium viscosissimum), and other colorful wildflowers. Wildlife, including moose, deer, and elk, may be seen, and the aspen and deciduous shrub areas are favorite spots for nesting songbirds. Highlights of the area include camping at Granite Creek Campground and several popular dispersed campsites, and views of Granite Falls. Granite Hot Springs pool offers a chance to soak in a developed natural hot springs for a minimal cost.

Viewing Information: There are no formal viewing sites for wildflowers, but visitors can enjoy a scenic drive along the Granite Creek road and stop at any pullout or at one of several trailheads and developed sites. Peak wildflower season runs from late June in the lower elevations through early August. Many trails leave the Granite Creek canyon, including the main Granite Creek Trail, leading north into the Gros Ventre Wilderness from the hot springs area. The Granite Highline Trail climbs gradually from the trailhead area where blue flax (Linum lewisii), sulfur flower (Eriogonum umbellatum) and slender cinquefoil (Potentilla gracilis) grace the side of the trail. About a mile up this trail a forest fire has left picturesque snags and fields of wildflowers. Heartleaf arnica (Arnica cordifolia) and mountain hollyhock (Iliamna rivularis) put on a spectacular display in mid-late July.

Safety First: Use standard precautions regarding personal safety. Be aware of your surroundings.Plan to have the gear and clothing you need, let your friends and family know where you are going.

Directions: Travel east on US 191 from Hoback Jct, WY for 15 miles, turn north onto Granite Creek Road, travel to end (Granite Hot Springs) or stop anywhere along the way for views, walks, forest trails.

Ownership and Management: USDA Forest Service, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Jackson Ranger District.

Closest Town: Bondurant, Wyoming.