Eastern Region

PHOTOS

inland lake in July in Michigan.
Inland lake in Michigan in July. Photo by U.S. Forest Service.

sand cherry.
Sand Cherry (Prunus pumila). Moquah Pine Barrens, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. Photo by Jeff Cate.

big and little bluestem in December along a National Forest road.
Big and little bluestem in December. Photo by U.S. Forest Service.

The region is rich in Native American history and culture. French voyagers and English explorers traveled the region's truly huge water bodies, such as the Ohio River, Mississippi River, and the Great Lakes. They initiated missionaries, fur trading, and timbering.

Islands of green in a sea of people, the Eastern Region is the most geographically, ecologically, and socially diverse area in the United States. Regional boundaries contain 20 states with over 43% of the nation's population, making it the most urban. Nine of the top 20 metropolitan areas in the U.S. are within the Region's boundary. National Forest boundaries include 24 million acres of land, although only one of every two acres within these boundaries is National Forest land. Management of the 12 eastern National Forests is thus extremely complex.

The Eastern Region is rich in water with over 10,000 lakes, 15,000 miles of streams, and 2 million acres of wetlands. The 12 million acres of national forest system lands are among the largest contiguous blocks of public lands. They are very rich in biological diversity and harbor 605 Regional Forester Sensitive Plants (PDF, 516 KB) and 13 federally threatened or endangered plants (PDF, 91 KB). Community types include: boreal forests; tall grass prairie; pine barrens; shoreline along three Great Lakes; central hardwood forests; glades; bogs; Appalachian foothills; the White Mountains; some of the most extensive virgin forests in the eastern U.S., and so much more.

Rare Plant Conservation Success Stories

Wildflower Links

Butterfly Checklists

The Forest Service Eastern Region developed checklists of butterfly species that may be found on the national forests and grasslands of the northeastern United States.

Non-native Invasive Species Learning Kit

Non-Native Invasive Species Learning Kit logo.

Developed by the Forest Service's Eastern Region, Interactive Non-native Invasive Species learning kits are available to educate preschool to adult groups about non-native invasive plants and animals.

Wildflower Photographs

red columbine.
Red columbine (Aquilegia canadensis). Huron-Manistee National Forest. Photo by Larry Stritch.

wild ginger.
Wild ginger (Asarum canadense). Monongahela National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

pawpaw.
Pawpaw (Asimina triloba). Hoosier National Forest. Photo by Wayne Owen.

blue bead lily.
Blue bead lily (Clintonia borealis). Ottawa National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

bunchberry.
Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis). Superior National Forest. Photo by Erin Heep.

pink lady's slipper.
Pink lady's slipper (Cypripedium acaule). White Mountain National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

White lady's slipper.
White lady's slipper (Cypripedium candidum). Midewin Tall Grass Prairie. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

squirrel corn.
Squirrel corn (Dicentra canadensis). Monongahela National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

yellow coneflower.
Yellow coneflower (Echinacea paradoxa). Mark Twain National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

hepatica.
Hepatica (Hepatica acutiloba). Green Mountain National Forest. Photo by Diane Burbank.

Northern plains blazing star.
Northern plains blazing star (Liatris ligulistylis). Chequamegon National Forest. Photo by Larry Rantula.

gaywings.
Gaywings (Polygala pauciflora). Allegheny National Forest. Photo by Penny Stritch.

purple pitcher plant.
Purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea). Chippewa National Forest. Photo by Rhonda Stewart.

fire pink.
Fire pink (Silene virginica). Wayne National Forest. Photo by T.G. Barnes, USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

star flower.
Star flower (Trientalis borealis). Finger Lakes. Photo by Penny Stritch.

nodding wakerobin.
Nodding wakerobin (Trillium flexipes). Shawnee National Forest. Photo by Penny Stritch.

Canadian violet.
Canadian violet (Viola canadensis). Hiawatha National Forest. Photo by Larry Stritch.

bird's-foot violet.
Bird's-foot violet (Viola pedata). Mark Twain National Forest. Photo by Larry Stritch.