Eastern Region Viewing Area

LOCATION and PHOTOS

St. Ignace Native Plant Garden with wild bergamot, goldenrod and highbush cranberry.
St. Ignace Native Plant Garden with wild bergamot, goldenrod and highbush cranberry. Photo by Sara Davis, Hiawatha National Forest.

Coreopsis lanceolata.
Lance-leaved Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata). Photo by Sara Davis, Hiawatha National Forest.

Aster novae-angliae.
New England Aster (Aster novae-angliae). Photo by Sara Davis, Hiawatha National Forest.

St. Ignace Ranger District Native Plant Garden

Forest: Hiawatha National Forest

District: St. Ignace Ranger District

Description: The St. Ignace District office is home to a beautiful array of native wildflowers that can also be found locally throughout the Hiawatha National forest. All the plants in the gardens are native to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, which is home to many different plant communities. Both woodland plants and prairie species are abundant in the gardens. These native plants thrive without the benefit of fertilizer or watering. Stop by throughout the seasons to view early spring wildflowers to late summer bloomers that attract butterflies. You will find wild columbine, trillium, bloodroot, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, and yellow lady’s slipper. The gardens are most colorful in late summer, when the aster, coreopsis, black-eyed Susan, wild bergamot, blazing star, and goldenrods are blooming. Labels for the wildflowers are in the gardens so they can be easily identified.

Directions: St. Ignace, located on the east zone of the Hiawatha National Forest, is in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan. US Highway 2 follows the northern shore of Lake Michigan. The District office is located on the north side of US-2 approximately 6 miles west of the Mackinac Bridge. The gardens are found in front of the main office building. Check out our information kiosk to see “What’s Blooming Now” posters.

Ownership and Management: U.S. Forest Service, Hiawatha National Forest, St. Ignace Ranger District.

Closest Town: St. Ignace, Michigan.