Eastern Region Viewing Area

LOCATION and PHOTOS

Vineyard posts and wires, remnants of the past, are still visible in this area that is becoming dense with shrub species.
Vineyard posts and wires, remnants of the past, are still visible in this area that is becoming dense with shrub species. Photo by Elisabeth McLane.

Cornus racemosa.
Gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa) is attractive both in flower and in fruit. Photo courtesy Smithsonian.

Holcus lanatus.
Velvet grass (Holcus lanatus) in bloom. Photo by Nicky Staunton Courtesy Smithsonian.

Satterly Hill and North Country National Scenic Trail

Forest: Finger Lakes National Forest

District: Hector Ranger District

Description: Grassland and shrub land are probably the most floristically diverse habitats on the Finger Lakes National Forest in New York, offering an abundance of opportunities to view hundreds of species of flowering plants. The North Country National Scenic Trail traverses through such scenic shrubland on the southern end of the Forest, as it winds its way across Satterly Hill. Over 100 species of wildflowers, ferns, graminoids, shrubs, and trees are known to occur there. In some places remnants of old vineyards can be seen, although they are gradually being removed and the habitat returned to shrubland.

For the grass, sedge, and rush enthusiast, over 20 species occur at Satterly Hill, many of them in bloom in late spring to early summer. Later in the summer, at least ten species of aster (Symphiotrichum sp.) and goldenrod (Euthamia and Solidago sp.) are visible. Throughout the season a variety of shrubs can be seen, including four species of blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) and gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa).

Safety First: Poison ivy occurs in these shrublands, although it is uncommon; take care not to handle it, or your boots, if you have walked through it.

Directions: From the town of Burdett, New York, drive north on Satterly Hill Road. The North Country National Scenic Trail can be accessed on either side of the road, about a half mile south of the intersection of Covert and Satterly Hill Roads. Hike east or west; in either case you walk about a mile before coming to a road. Turn back to your car, or explore farther. For more information, contact MaryBeth Deller, botanist for the Green Mountain and Finger Lakes National Forest.

Closest Town: Burdett, New York.