Threatened, Endangered, and Proposed (TEP) Plant Profile

Closeup Cirsium loncholepis flowers.
Cirsium loncholepis. Photo by Ann Howald, courtesy of California Native Plant Society.

Closeup Cirsium loncholepis flowers.
Cirsium loncholepis. Photo by Ann Howald, courtesy of California Native Plant Society.

Closeup Cirsium loncholepis flowers.
Cirsium loncholepis. Photo by Lloyd Simpson, Los Padres National Forest.

Cirsium loncholepis habitat.
Cirsium loncholepis habitat. Photo courtesy of California Native Plant Society.

Cirsium loncholepis range map.
Cirsium loncholepis range map.

Cirsium loncholepis, La Graciosa thistle

ESA Status

Visit the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Species Profile link below for links to listing and other USFWS documents.

Threats \1

  • Habitat destruction and degradation due to development, conversion to agriculture, and flooding
  • Groundwater pumping
  • Oilfield development
  • Competition from non-native plants
  • Invasion of its altered habitats by willows

Conservation Status

National Forest and Grassland Occurrence

More Information

1/ In addition to the threats of development and motor vehicles, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS)(1995) lists groundwater pumping as a threat. Skinner and Pavlik (1997) say grazing is a threat, but USFWS (1995) indicated that grazing in the riparian habitat may reduce the competition from other species (this species is spiny and may not be grazed). Oil production is also considered a threat by the California Natural Diversity Database and USFWS (1995). In 2001 the California Native Plant Society indicate that developments, vehicles, groundwater pumping, non-native plants and possibly grazing (CNPS 2001). In addition to the threats of development and motor vehicles, USFWS (1995) lists groundwater pumping as a threat. Skinner and Pavlik (1997) say grazing is a threat, but USFWS (1995) indicated that grazing in the riparian habitat may reduce the competition from other species (this species is spiny and may not be grazed). Oil production is also considered a threat by the California Natural Diversity Database and USFWS (1995). In 2001 the California Native Plant Society indicate that developments, vehicles, groundwater pumping, non-native plants and possibly grazing (CNPS 2001). In addition to the threats of development and motor vehicles, USFWS (1995) lists groundwater pumping as a threat. Skinner and Pavlik (1997) say grazing is a threat, but USFWS (1995) indicated that grazing in the riparian habitat may reduce the competition from other species (this species is spiny and may not be grazed). Oil production is also considered a threat by the California Natural Diversity Database and USFWS (1995). In 2001 the California Native Plant Society indicate that developments, vehicles, groundwater pumping, non-native plants and possibly grazing (CNPS 2001).