Critically Imperiled Plant Profile
(Not Listed or Proposed under the Endangered Species Act)

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum.
Sepals in this Sedum are long, narrow, and pointed. Photo by Dean Wm. Taylor.

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum.
The fleshy leaves nestle among rocks, where they can withstand the long, hot California summer. Photo by Julie Kierstead Nelson.

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum range map.
Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum range map.

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum, Canyon Creek stonecrop
(also known as Sedum paradisum)

Threats

  • Populations along a backcountry wilderness trail are threatened by trampling.

Conservation Status

National Forest and Grassland Occurrence

More Information

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum.
Each flower produces a dry fruit with many tiny seeds. Photo by Julie Kierstead Nelson.

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum habitat.
Although the first populations of this plant were found on granite outcrops in the Trinity Alps, subsequent populations have been found on other types of rock, and at lower elevations. Photo by Dean Wm. Taylor.

Sedum obtusatum ssp. paradisum and Garrya spp. resprouting on a burned area.
This population had the misfortune to be underneath a stand of silk-tassel (Garrya) shrubs that burned in a lightning-caused wildfire in the early summer of 2008. You can see the green silk-tassel shoots already resprouting from the bases of blackened stems in this photo taken in September 2008. Some of the stonecrop in the foreground survived. Photo by Julie Kierstead Nelson.