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Success Stories

San Juan Public Lands Climate Change Vulnerability

[GRAPHIC: A forested landscape with a purple flowering plant in the foreground.]The Tres Rios Field Office and the San Juan National Forest have been working together to assess resources that may be vulnerable to climate change. Using background pieces, the first developed by Karen Cozetta, Jason Neff and Imitiaz Ragala from University of Colorado and NOAA on downscaled climate predictions and the second by Julie Crawford and Mountain Studies Institute on comprehensive research summary of potential impacts to natural resources, vulnerability assessments on water resources, sensitive wildlife species, rare plants and dominant vegetative cover types were conducted.

While different tools and questions were considered for each assessment, the definition of vulnerability was consistent through all four assessments and used the basic framework from Glick et.al. 2011. Results indicate habitat and associated species that are at the margin topographically are some of the most vulnerable; two examples are alpine habitat and species and low elevation riparian areas and species. The two units continue to work together, monitor the impacts of climate change and develop adaptations strategies. Contact Gretchen Fitzgerald, 970-884-1435, for further information.

SJPL Climate Change Vulnerability Poster (1,622 PDF)

Southern Nevada Restoration Team

Nearly a decade ago, the four Southern Nevada Agency Partnership (SNAP) agencies established the Southern Nevada Restoration Team as a collaborative forum where members of the four federal agencies would discuss and coordinate a response to major ecosystem disturbances and restore important habitats. Their 2011 accomplishments report showcases the diverse work involved in restoring public lands, and features some dramatic before and after photos.

Southern Nevada Restoration Team web page & 2011 Accomplishment Report

The Art of Burning Across Landscapes (YouTube Video)

A Service First project produced by the BLM Lakeview District, Fremont-Winema National Forest and Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge.

Pacific Northwest Recreation Map Series

When the concept of Service First was introduced to the Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region and Bureau of Land Management Oregon State Office in 2003, people involved with these maps saw an opportunity to combine forces and create a single map set covering all public lands. More

Modoc Washoe Experimental Stewardship Program

Finding cooperative ways to improve the health of public rangelands has been the focus since the 1980s for the BLM and Forest Service offices participating as members of the Modoc Washoe Experimental Stewardship Program in northeast California and far northwest Nevada. More

BLM Montana/Dakotas Promotes Service First Opportunities

The BLM-Montana/Dakotas has been successful in meeting the Service First goals of improving customer service, increasing operational efficiency, and improving stewardship of the land. More

Susanville Interagency Fire Center Service First

Recognizing the pooling resources is an efficient and effective approach to protecting lives, property and natural resources, the Bureau of Land Management, Lassen National Forest and myriad other agencies have been taking a "Service First" approach for more than three decades through the Susanville Interagency Fire Center. More

Bizz Johnson National Recreation Trail

The Bureau of Land Management's Eagle Lake Field Office and the Lassen National Forest, both based in Susanville, Calif., are offering the public high quality recreation experiences on the jointly managed Bizz Johnson National Recreation Trail. More

FS and BLM dual-delegated unit in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

The San Luis Valley Public Lands Center (PLC) is a Service First, dual-delegated unit. All line officers are dual-delegated having both Forest Service (FS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) management authorities/responsibilities. All units are made up of blended staff. One unit also has a Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Ecological Services staff member that provides technical assistance and, on some projects, is an ID team member. We share personnel and resources with San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (FWS) and the National Park Service’s (NPS) Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve.

We have received many compliments from the public because they can obtain a variety of BLM and/or FS permits and information from one source through our Visitor Information Services staff. Because we have blended staff working on travel management, we have been able to ensure that our road systems and designation match up and we’re not creating additional problems for the public.

By integrating staff, budget, and other resources, we are able to effectively save 8-10 full-time equivalent (FTEs) in any given year as compared to separate BLM and FS units. This savings is possible by adding to the capacity of one agency or the other to complete priority projects. Either agency can purchase expertise from the other; eliminating the need for each agency to have all expertise on staff. Flexibility is gained by the ability to move personnel to the agency and/program where the need and funding is greatest.

NPS, FWS, BLM and FS Interagency Fire Unit at San Luis Valley PLC

Under the Service First authority, we have created an interagency fire unit that includes FS, BLM, FWS, and NPS. Oversight is provided by a Fire Board with representatives from each agency. This allows the San Luis Valley PLC to support three fully staffed engines. In addition to providing a strong multi-agency suppression presence, the multi-agency fire unit is able to bring substantial support to fuels reduction and habitat treatment projects using prescribed fire. Prescribed fire operations are being carried out on Federal lands under various jurisdictions by this multi-agency unit. This allows us to conduct prescribed fire projects on the NPS, FWS Refuges, BLM and FS administered land.

FWS and BLM Combined Human Resources (HR) in Alaska

The Alaska Combined HR Service Center was established as a pilot program in 2007 under the auspices of Public Law 106-291, as amended and Public Law 109-54, Title IV, Section 428, know as Service First. The purpose was to allow the BLM and the FWS offices in Alaska to cooperate in an Administrative Service Center designed to improve the delivery of administrative services, reduce the duplication of services, and take advantage of the best practices of each agency. The Combined Center consists of two units, organized by HR function. The staffing function is located in the BLM Alaska state office in downtown Anchorage. The classification and employee relations function is located at the FWS regional office, in midtown Anchorage. Both units are cross delegated and comprised of blended staff. The combined center provides all aspects of HR services the approximately 1,500 employees of both organizations.

Although the combination has not resulted in any savings of FTEs, utilization of the strengths of the whole has allowed us to more effectively meet the HR needs and goals of both organizations, where those needs may not previously have been met by the independent offices. We have developed and continue to develop a shared HR website, which is hosted by BLM and available to all employees from both bureaus that provides a wide range of HR information. Employment opportunities are posted in the same format and use the same internet software, which improves the public's ability to apply for vacant positions in either organization. The combined center staff has also been introduced to and become more familiar with the culture and mission of each agency enabling them to develop a deeper understanding of the HR needs required in each organization.

BLM and NPS co-managed unit in Arizona and Utah

Two managers, one from each agency, co-manage the 1,050,963 acre Grand Canyon Parashant National Monument, created under Presidential Proclamation in 2000. Cross-delegation authorizes them to jointly supervise an integrated staff. The Monument serves as a model of efficient interagency coordination and cooperation, incorporating the strengths of each agency. As a Transfer Authority Project in 2008 and 2009, this unit has a streamlined process for transferring funds between agencies (Service First 1151 Transfer form) that will continue to be implemented and tested for applications. To date, it has been used to transfer BLM funds to NPS. It is hoped that a fully tested and refined process could be opened to a national audience.

 

Contact:

Lura Matthews
Acting Service First Coordinator
303-239-3950
Bureau of Land Management

Forest Service

National Park Service

US Fish and Wildlife Service