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Wildlife and Terrestrial Ecosystems

Bull trout and other cold water fish are sensitive to changes in stream temperature.

Range delineation of bull trout using environmental DNA

Environmental DNA is emerging as a powerful indicator of presence or absence for sensitive aquatic species, such as bull trout.
Ferruginous hawk fitted with a GPS transmitter.

Response of ferruginous hawks to energy development

Researchers fitted ferruginous hawk with GPS transmitters to study their movements relative to oil, gas, and wind energy development.
Rocky mountain fisher are reclusive carnivores living in mature, high-elevation forests (photo by Michael Schwartz).

Rocky mountain fisher are reclusive carnivores living in mature, high-elevation forests (photo by Michael Schwartz).
Habitat of the greater sage grouse is increasingly fragmented due to housing development and resource extraction.

Gene flow among breeding areas of greater sage-grouse

Habitat of the greater sage grouse is increasingly fragmented due to housing development and resource extraction, with implications for gene flow among core breeding areas.
Female Canada lynx select den areas with high spruce-fir tree basal area, high horizontal cover, and abundant large-diameter trees.

Den selection of Canada lynx

Female Canada lynx select den areas with high spruce-fir tree basal area, high horizontal cover, and abundant large-diameter trees.
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The Wildlife and Terrestrial Ecosystems program is engaged in sustaining species and ecosystems of concern through integrated and multidisciplinary research. The program investigates ecological interactions within and between aquatic and terrestrial plant and animal communities, social and economic values associated with consumptive and non-consumptive uses of fish and wildlife, management of terrestrial and aquatic habitats, and outcomes of land and water uses and natural disturbances on wildlife populations and habitats.