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Hayman Fire Science Symposium: Lessons Learned After Ten Years

The Hayman Fire Science Symposium: Lessons Learned After Ten Years of Recovery, Rehabilitation, & Restoration took place on June 21, 2012.

The Hayman Fire started on June 8, 2002, 95 miles southwest of Denver, CO. It quickly grew to become the largest fire in recorded Colorado history, burning almost 140,000 acres. In the decade since the Hayman Fire took place, a significant amount of scientific research and learning has occurred on the burned area.

The tenth anniversary of the Hayman Fire coincided with the National Forest Foundation’s Treasured Landscapes campaign and provided a timely opportunity to share this new scientific information about the impacts and implications of the fire with a broader audience. On June 21, 2012, research scientists, land managers, planners, conservation organizations, and interested community members convened at the REI in downtown Denver to share lessons learned ten years post-fire. The talks from the symposium are posted below.

Setting the Stage

The historical and current role of fire in the Colorado Front Range

  • Merrill Kaufmann, Research Forest Ecologist (Emeritus), US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Fire behavior during the Hayman

  • Mark Finney, Research Forester, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Watershed Impacts: Burn Severity, Erosion, Runoff, and Water Quality

Soil burn severity

  • Pete Robichaud, Research Engineer, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Postfire runoff and erosion

  • Joe Wagenbrenner, Engineer, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
  • Pete Robichaud, Research Engineer, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Short- and long-term geomorphic change and recovery

  • Lee MacDonald, Professor, Colorado State University, Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship

Water quality — part I

  • Deb Entwistle, Hyrdrologist, Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest

Water quality — part II

  • Derek Pierson, Chemist, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Managing water after the fire — part I

  • Don Kennedy, Environmental Scientist, Denver Water

Managing water after the fire — part II

  • Mike McHugh, Environmental Permitting Coordinator, Aurora Water

Human-Hayman Interactions

The social science side of fire and fuels management

  • Julie Schaefers, Social Scientist
  • Carrie Tremblatt, US Forest Service, Region 2

Ecological Responses: Vegetation and Wildlife

Native and exotic understory plant dynamics

  • Paula Fornwalt, Research Ecologist, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

A woodpecker’s perspective of the Hayman Fire

  • Natasha Carr, Ecologist, US Geological Society

Riparian small mammal communities

  • Craig Hansen, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, US Fish and Wildlife Service

Pawnee montane skipper populations

  • John Sovell, Invertebrate Zoologist and Ecologist, Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado State University
  • Mikele Painter, Wildlife Biologist, Pike and San Isabel National Forests

Hayman Restoration

Restoring the Watershed

  • Dave Rosgen, Hydrologist, Wildland Hydrology

Ephemeral channel stabilization

  • Eric Billmeyer, Research Director, Rocky Mountain Field Institute

Watershed restoration

  • Dana Butler, Hydrologist, Pike-San Isabel National Forest

Reforesting severely burned areas following the Hayman Fire

  • Bob Post, Forester, Pike-San Isabel National Forest

Concluding Remarks

Looking backward, looking forward

  • Sam Foster, Station Director, US Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station
link to National Forest Foundation