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Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States


Raish, Carol; McSweeney, Alice M. 2008. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States. In: Multifunctional grasslands in a changing world, Volume II; XXI International Grassland Congress; VIII International Rangeland Congress. Beijing, China: Guangdong People's Publishing House: 857.

This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community land grants from the King of Spain and later from the Mexican government. After US acquisition in 1848, many communities lost communal range and woodlands from their land grants . Much of the lost grant land eventually came under federal management. Descendants of grantees are now livestock permittees on national forests, with much smaller holdings encompassing remaining house lots and gardens. Some communities are almost completely surrounded by public land with no other grazing areas for the animals (Eastman et al. 2000).

Keywords: tradition, ranching heritage, culture, grazing allotments, permittee ranchers


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http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2008_raish_c001.pdf

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Title: RMRS Other Publications: Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States
Electronic Publish Date: April 8, 2009
Last Update:
April 8, 2009

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