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When are native species inappropriate for conservation planting?


Ganguli, Amy C.; Engle, David M.; Mayer, Paul M.; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D. 2008. When are native species inappropriate for conservation planting? Rangelands. 30: 27-32.

Conservation agencies and organizations are generally reluctant to encourage the use of invasive plant species in conservation programs. Harsh lessons learned in the past have resulted in tougher screening protocols for nonin digenous species introductions and removal of many nonindigenous invaders from planting programs worldwide. Although the focus of screening and risk assessment programs has traditionally been on nonindigenous species, we present an example of a rapidly expanding native tree, eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), widely used in planting programs throughout the United States and that should be screened for invasive potential. Intentional planting of eastern redcedar and fire suppression have converted many native grasslands to eastern redcedar woodlands. We recommend evaluating the invasive potential of all species proposed for use in conservation programs and present a conceptual framework for such an assessment.

Keywords: native species, conservation, screening and risk assessment programs


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http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2008_ganguli_a002.pdf

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Title: RMRS Other Publications: When are native species inappropriate for conservation planting?
Electronic Publish Date: April 7, 2009
Last Update:
April 7, 2009

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