Rocky Mountain Research Station Publications

Rocky Mountain Research Station
New Publications: October - December 2001

This issue lists publications by Station authors and major cooperators in the 3-month period shown above.

TITLE: Mechanisms of range expansion and removal of mesquite in desert grasslands of the Southwestern United States
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-81
ORDER #: 62 (NOTE: This publication was first listed in the July-September 2001 New Publications List.)

Mechanisms of range expansion and removal of mesquite in desert grasslands of the Southwestern United States. Wilson, Thomas B.; Webb, Robert H.; Thompson, Thomas L. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-81. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 23 p.

During the last 150 years, two species of mesquite trees in the Southwestern United States have become increasingly common in what formerly was desert grassland. These trees have spread from nearby watercourses onto relatively xeric upland areas, decreasing rangeland grass production. Management attempts to limit or reverse this spread have been largely unsuccessful. This paper reviews studies regarding mesquite natural history and management strategies, emphasizing studies published during the past decade.

TITLE: Projected use of grazed forages in the United States: 2000 to 2050: a technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-82
ORDER #: 63 (NOTE: This publication was first listed in the July-September 2001 New Publications List.)

Projected use of grazed forages in the United States: 2000 to 2050: a technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment. Van Tassell, Larry W.; Bartlett, E. Tom; Mitchell, John E. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-82. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 73 p.

Scenario analysis techniques were used to combine projections from 35 grazed forage experts to estimate future forage demand scenarios and examine factors that are anticipated to impact the use of grazed forages in the South, North, and West Regions of the United States. The amount of land available for forage production is projected to decrease in all regions while local impacts from environmental concerns and government policies will be significant in areas where resource concerns have already emerged. Urban sprawl, suburbanization, and increased demands for recreation were projected to be the major factors decreasing grazing lands.

TITLE: Guide to the willows of Shoshone National Forest
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-83
ORDER #: 64 (NOTE: This publication was first listed in the July-September 2001 New Publications List.)

Guide to the willows of Shoshone National Forest. Fertig, Walter; Markow, Stuart. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-83. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 79 p.

Correct identification of willow species is an important part of land management. This guide describes the 29 willows that are known to occur on the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. Keys to pistillate catkins and leaf morphology are included with illustrations and plant descriptions.

TITLE: A field guide for forest indicator plants, sensitive plants, and noxious weeds of the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-84
ORDER #: 65 (NOTE: This publication was first listed in the July-September 2001 New Publications List.)

A field guide for forest indicator plants, sensitive plants, and noxious weeds of the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. Houston, Kent E.; Hartung, Walter J.; Hartung, Carol J. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-84. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 184 p.

This field guide was designed for people with minimal botanical training. It is an identification aid to plant species that have ecological indicator value, are on sensitive species lists, or are considered noxious weeds. It contains illustrations and simplified taxonomic descriptions.

TITLE: Riparian and wetland plant community types of the Shoshone National Forest
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-85
ORDER #: 66 (NOTE: This publication was first listed in the July-September 2001 New Publications List.)

Riparian and wetland plant community types of the Shoshone National Forest. Walford, Gillian; Jones, George; Fertig, Walt; Mellman-Brown, Sabine; Houston, Kent E. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-85. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 122 p.

This classification of riparian and wetland plant communities in the Shoshone National Forest was a cooperative project between the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database (WYNDD) of The Nature Conservancy and the Shoshone National Forest. This project identifies groups of plant species that commonly occur together in particular environmental settings. Each such group of species, or plant community type, is identified by the structure of the vegetation and by the species contributing the most canopy cover. The classification identifies physiognomic types based on the amounts of trees, tall shrubs, low shrubs, and herbaceous plants; and dominance types within each physiognomic type. The term "community type" is used in a broad sense to mean both seral or successional vegetation types and potential or climax vegetation types.

TITLE: Arid and semiarid land stewardship: a 10-year review of accomplishments and contributions of the International Arid Lands Consortium
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-89
ORDER #: 67

Arid and semiarid land stewardship: a 10-year review of accomplishments and contributions of the International Arid Lands Consortium. Ffolliott, Peter F.; Dawson, Jeffrey O.; Fisher, James T.; Moshe, Itshack; DeBoers, Darrell W.; Fulbright, Timothy E.; Tracy, John; Al Musa, Abdullah; Johnson, Carter; Chamie, Jim P. M. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-89. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 74 p.

The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and restoration or reclamation of arid and semiarid lands worldwide. This publication presents a review of the accomplishments and contributions of IALC's science and technical programs through a synopsis of the projects and initiatives. We group the projects and initiatives into soil and water resources development and conservation, land use and reclamation, processes enhancing the management of ecological systems, and inventorying and measurements techniques and monitoring.

TITLE: Southwestern rare and endangered plants: proceedings of the third conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ
SERIES #: RMRS-P-23
ORDER #: 68

Southwestern rare and endangered plants: proceedings of the third conference; 2000 September 25-28; Flagstaff, AZ. Maschinski, Joyce; Holter, Louella, tech. eds. 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 250 p.

The rising concern about preserving biodiversity has motivated conservationists throughout the world to seek opportunities to increase awareness about the plight of rare species. In the southwestern United States, nearly 1,200 rare plant species are imperiled. In an effort to promote understanding about rare plant biology and conservation strategies, the Third Southwestern Rare and Endangered Plant Conference convened more than 150 individuals working for State, Federal, academic, and private agencies. These contributed papers from the conference review current research findings related to the demographic, monitoring, reintroduction, ecological and genetic studies done on southwestern rare plant species.


TITLE: New Pubs: October - December 2001
Publish Date: March 21, 2002
Expires: March 21, 2003
Last Update:
March 28, 2007

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