Rocky Mountain Research Station Publications

Rocky Mountain Research Station
New Publications: July-September 2001

This issue lists publications by Station authors and major cooperators in the 3-month period shown above.

TITLE: Linking wilderness research and management-volume 1. Wilderness fire restoration and management: an annotated reading list
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 1
ORDER #: 43

Linking wilderness research and management-volume 1. Wilderness fire restoration and management: an annotated reading list. Hourdequin, Marion. 2001. (Wright, Vita, series ed.) Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 1. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 40 p.

The Wilderness Act of 1964 designates wilderness areas as places where natural conditions prevail and humans leave landscapes untrammeled. Managers of wilderness and similarly protected areas have a mandate to maintain wildland fire as a natural ecological process. This reading list summarizes more than 150 books, articles, and online resources that provide context for wilderness fire restoration and management. The first section provides background information on fire ecology, behavior, and effects that forms a foundation for managing fire in wilderness. The second section focuses more closely on wilderness and protected areas and emphasizes the restoration of fire to areas affected by fire suppression. The final section lists additional resources, such as Web sites and sample fire plans, useful in wilderness fire planning.

TITLE: Linking wilderness research and management-volume 2. Defining, managing, and monitoring wilderness visitor experiences: an annotated reading list
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 2
ORDER #: 44

Linking wilderness research and management-volume 2. Defining, managing, and monitoring wilderness visitor experiences: an annotated reading list. Glaspell, Brian; Puttkammer, Annette. 2001. (Wright, Vita, series ed.) Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 2. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 29 p.

Opportunities for unique visitor experiences are among the defining attributes of wilderness. In order to understand and protect these experiences, natural and social scientists have pursued an ever-expanding program of wildland recreation research. This reading list represents a sample of information related to defining, managing, and monitoring wilderness experiences and is organized in a way that is intended to be useful to both managers and researchers. Section I contains both philosophical and empirical papers that address values related to wilderness and wilderness experiences. Section II contains papers that describe wilderness experiences and specific dimensions of those experiences. Section III has references that describe influences on wilderness experiences and approaches to managing them. Section IV addresses long-term wilderness planning and monitoring.

TITLE: Linking wilderness research and management-volume 3. Recreation fees in wilderness and other public lands: an annotated reading list
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 3
ORDER #: 45

Linking wilderness research and management-volume 3. Recreation fees in wilderness and other public lands: an annotated reading list. Puttkammer, Annette. 2001. (Wright, Vita, series ed.) Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-79-VOL 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 29 p.

This annotated reading list provides an introduction to the issue of recreation fees on public lands. With an emphasis on wilderness recreation fees, this compilation of historical and recent publications is divided into the following sections: historical context, arguments for and against fees, pricing mechanisms and the effects of price, public attitudes toward fees, the influence of fees on recreation visitation and use patterns, and methods to estimate fee revenue and determine priorities for expenditures.

TITLE: GIS applications to wilderness management: potential uses and limitations
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-80
ORDER #: 46

GIS applications to wilderness management: potential uses and limitations. Landres, Peter; Spildie, David R.; Queen, Lloyd P. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-80. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 9 p.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are increasingly being used in all areas of natural resource management. This paper first presents a brief primer on GIS, and then discusses potential applications of GIS to wilderness management in the areas of inventorying, monitoring, analysis, planning, and communication. Outlined are the limitations and pitfalls that could compromise the effectiveness of a wilderness GIS, and several suggestions are included for improving the chances of successfully using GIS in wilderness management.

TITLE: Mechanisms of range expansion and removal of mesquite in desert grasslands of the Southwestern United States
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-81
ORDER #: 47

Mechanisms of range expansion and removal of mesquite in desert grasslands of the Southwestern United States. Wilson, Thomas B.; Webb, Robert H.; Thompson, Thomas L. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-81. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 23 p.

During the last 150 years, two species of mesquite trees in the Southwestern United States have become increasingly common in what formerly was desert grassland. These trees have spread from nearby watercourses onto relatively xeric upland areas, decreasing rangeland grass production. Management attempts to limit or reverse this spread have been largely unsuccessful. This paper reviews studies regarding mesquite natural history and management strategies, emphasizing studies published during the past decade.

TITLE: Projected use of grazed forages in the United States: 2000 to 2050: a technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-82
ORDER #: 48

Projected use of grazed forages in the United States: 2000 to 2050: a technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment. Van Tassell, Larry W.; Bartlett, E. Tom; Mitchell, John E. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-82. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 73 p.

Scenario analysis techniques were used to combine projections from 35 grazed forage experts to estimate future forage demand scenarios and examine factors that are anticipated to impact the use of grazed forages in the South, North, and West Regions of the United States. The amount of land available for forage production is projected to decrease in all regions while local impacts from environmental concerns and government policies will be significant in areas where resource concerns have already emerged. Urban sprawl, suburbanization, and increased demands for recreation were projected to be the major factors decreasing grazing lands.

TITLE: Guide to the willows of Shoshone National Forest
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-83
ORDER #: 49

Guide to the willows of Shoshone National Forest. Fertig, Walter; Markow, Stuart. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-83. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 79 p.

Correct identification of willow species is an important part of land management. This guide describes the 29 willows that are known to occur on the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. Keys to pistillate catkins and leaf morphology are included with illustrations and plant descriptions.

TITLE: A field guide for forest indicator plants, sensitive plants, and noxious weeds of the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-84
ORDER #: 50

A field guide for forest indicator plants, sensitive plants, and noxious weeds of the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. Houston, Kent E.; Hartung, Walter J.; Hartung, Carol J. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-84. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 184 p.

This field guide was designed for people with minimal botanical training. It is an identification aid to plant species that have ecological indicator value, are on sensitive species lists, or are considered noxious weeds. It contains illustrations and simplified taxonomic descriptions.

TITLE: Riparian and wetland plant community types of the Shoshone National Forest
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-85
ORDER #: 51

Riparian and wetland plant community types of the Shoshone National Forest. Walford, Gillian; Jones, George; Fertig, Walt; Mellman-Brown, Sabine; Houston, Kent E. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-85. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 122 p.

This classification of riparian and wetland plant communities in the Shoshone National Forest was a cooperative project between the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database (WYNDD) of The Nature Conservancy and the Shoshone National Forest. This project identifies groups of plant species that commonly occur together in particular environmental settings. Each such group of species, or plant community type, is identified by the structure of the vegetation and by the species contributing the most canopy cover. The classification identifies physiognomic types based on the amounts of trees, tall shrubs, low shrubs, and herbaceous plants; and dominance types within each physiognomic type. The term "community type" is used in a broad sense to mean both seral or successional vegetation types and potential or climax vegetation types.

TITLE: Visitor use density and wilderness experience: proceedings; 2000 June 1-3; Missoula, MT
SERIES #: RMRS-P-20
ORDER #: 52

Visitor use density and wilderness experience: proceedings; 2000 June 1-3; Missoula, MT. Friemund, Wayne A.; Cole, David N., comps. 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-20. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 67 p.

The workshop was convened to assess progress and offer further ideas regarding scientific contributions to (1) understanding relationships between visitor use density and wilderness experiences and (2) applying such knowledge to decisions about use limitation in wilderness and parks. The first paper provides an overview of the topic and the papers presented at the workshop. Subsequent papers include reviews of previous research, discussion of issues related to use limitation, exploration of the solitude concept and of visitor conflict, and explications of alternative research methodologies.

TITLE: Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT
SERIES #: RMRS-P-21
ORDER #: 53

Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 365 p.

The 53 papers in this proceedings include a section celebrating the 25-year anniversary of the Shrub Sciences Laboratory, three sections devoted to themes, genetics, and biodiversity, disturbance ecology and biodiversity, ecophysiology, community ecology, and field trip section. The anniversary session papers emphasized the productivity and history of the Shrub Sciences Laboratory, 100 years of genetics, plant materials development for wildland shrub ecosystems, and current challenges in management and research in wildland shrub ecosystems. The papers in each of the thematic science sessions were centered on wildland shrub ecosystems. The field trip featured the genetics and ecology of chenopod shrublands of east-central Utah.

TITLE: Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship
SERIES #: RMRS-P-22
ORDER #: 54

Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. 2001. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 188 p.

This volume is divided into three sections: (1) Ecological, Biological, and Physical Science; (2) Social and Cultural; and (3) Economics and Utilization. Effective ecological restoration requires a combination of science and management. The authors of the first section exemplified this integration in the course of addressing a broad range of topics, from detailed microsite and small-scale changes in fungal, plant, and animal communities, up through landscape, regional, and subcontinental scales. The authors of the second section focused on public attitudes, partnerships, and the relationship between social and ecological factors. In the third section, the economics and utilization of products from forest restoration were compared in several Western locations. The papers in this volume chronicle adaptive research that continues to deepen our understanding of restoration in ecosystems and social systems.

TITLE: Fire frequency effects on fuel loadings in pine-oak forests of Madrean Province
SERIES #: RMRS-RN-10
ORDER #: 55

Fire frequency effects on fuel loadings in pine-oak forests of Madrean Province. Escobedo, Francisco, J.; Ffolliott, Peter F.; Gottfried, Gerald J.; Garza, Florentino. 2001. Res. Note RMRS-RN-10. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Loadings of downed woody fuels in pine-oak forests of the Madrean Province are heavier on sites in southeastern Arizona with low fire frequencies and lower on sites in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, with high fire frequencies. Low fire frequencies in southeastern Arizona are attributed largely to past land uses and the fire suppression policies of land management agencies in the United States. Ecologists and land managers interested in reintroducing fire into these forests to reduce fuel loadings and meet other land management objectives could use information about fuel buildups in their planning efforts. Quantifying these fuel loadings could also be useful in improving fire behavior models for the forests.

TITLE: Assessing crown fire potential by linking models of surface and crown fire behavior
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-29
ORDER #: 56

Assessing crown fire potential by linking models of surface and crown fire behavior. Scott, Joe H.; Reinhardt, Elizabeth D. 2001. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-29. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 59 p.

Fire managers are increasingly concerned about the threat of crown fires, yet only now are quantitative methods for assessing crown fire hazard being developed. Links among existing mathematical models of fire behavior are used to develop two indices of crown fire hazard-the Torching Index and Crowning Index. These indices can be used to ordinate different forest stands by their relative susceptibility to crown fire and to compare the effectiveness of crown fire mitigation treatments. Example simulations are for western Montana Pinus ponderosa and Pinus contorta stands. Although some of the models presented here have had limited testing or restricted geographic applicability, the concepts will apply to models for other regions and new models with greater geographic applicability.

TITLE: Solar treatments for reducing survival of mountain pine beetle in infested ponderosa and lodgepole pine logs
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-30
ORDER #: 57

Solar treatments for reducing survival of mountain pine beetle in infested ponderosa and lodgepole pine logs. Negrón, José F.; Shepperd, Wayne A.; Mata, Steve A.; Popp, John B.; Asherin, Lance A.; Schoettle, Anna W.; Schmid, John M.; Leatherman, David A. 2001. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-30. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 11 p.

Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of solar radiation for reducing survival of mountain pine beetle populations in infested logs. Ponderosa pine logs were used in experiments 1 and 2 and lodgepole pine logs were used in experiment 3. Experiment 1 comprised three treatments: (1) one-layer solar treatment without plastic sheeting and logs rotated one-third of a turn once a week; (2) two-layer solar treatment with plastic sheeting; and (3) two-layer solar treatment without plastic sheeting. For experiment 2, two additional one-layer treatments were added: one-layer treatment with plastic sheeting and no rotation and a one-layer with no plastic sheeting and no rotation. Experiment 3 included all the above-mentioned one-layer treatments only. For all experiments, brood density per 0.05 m2 (0.5 ft2) was estimated before and after treatment and analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. We conclude that solar treatments are an effective alternative for reducing mountain pine beetle survival in infested ponderosa and lodgepole pine logs.

TITLE: Day users in wilderness: how different are they?
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-31
ORDER #: 58

Day users in wilderness: how different are they? Cole, David N. 2001. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-31. Ogden, UT: Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 29 p.

This study describes the trip and visitor characteristics, evaluations, and preferences of day users in wilderness, by contrasting them with overnight users. Data from the Three Sisters (OR), Desolation (CA), Bob Marshall (MT), Charles Deam (IN), Caney Creek (AR), Shining Rock (NC), and Cohutta (GA) Wildernesses are presented. Implications related to meeting the needs and desires of day users and the management of wilderness trails and destinations that receive heavy day use are discussed.

TITLE: Wood use in Colorado at the turn of the twenty-first century
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-32
ORDER #: 59

Wood use in Colorado at the turn of the twenty-first century. Lynch, Dennis L.; Mackes, Kurt. 2001. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-32. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 23 p.

This study estimates the kinds, uses, amount, and retail value of wood products consumed annually in Colorado from 1997 to 2000. Colorado uses tremendous amounts of wood products, but it imports most of it from other States and countries despite the abundant forests in Colorado that are capable of providing many types of wood products.

Two new CD-ROMs available in limited quantities.

TITLE: High mountain lake Research Natural Areas in Idaho
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-77-CD
ORDER #: 60

High mountain lake Research Natural Areas in Idaho. Rabe, Fred W. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-77-CD. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 1 CD-ROM.

Limnological characteristics are described for 27 lakes and 20 ponds in 32 established and proposed Research Natural Areas (RNA) representing seven subregions in the State. Field collections were made from the 1960s through 1999 by several researchers. Even though data about some of these lakes are not currently available, the databases can be updated as research continues. A classification is developed to include elevation, size, depth, production potential, and lake origin. Additional information includes pH, rock type and hydrology, aquatic plants, zooplankton, immature aquatic insects, and cold water vertebrates. The classification can be applied to gap analysis to identify missing or underrepresented natural area types. Future research efforts might focus on covering the gaps and bringing more high mountain lakes into the RNA system.

TITLE: An ecological characterization of the Greater Yellowstone Area
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-78-CD
ORDER #: 61

An ecological characterization of the Greater Yellowstone Area. Nesser, John A.; Maynard, C. Lee; Lund, Duane F. 2001. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-78-CD. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 1 CD-ROM.

This CD-ROM contains the documentation for "An Ecological Characterization of the Greater Yellowstone Area" and data compiled for the analysis. The results of this project provide an overview of the physical and environmental attributes of ecological units included within the Greater Yellowstone Area, along with selected applications.

New World Wide Web publication available on line

TITLE: Hosts and geographic distribution of Arceuthobium oxycedri
SERIES #: RMRS-RN-11 WWW
ORDER #: No hardcopy will be printed. Available on our Web site only: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_rn11/

Hosts and geographic distribution of Arceuthobium oxycedri. Ciesla, W. M.; Geils, B. W.; Adams, R. P. 2001. Res. Note RMRS-RN-11 WWW version 1.0. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_rn11/

Data on hosts and geographic distribution of the juniper dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobium oxycedri, are updated in light of changes in host nomenclature, political geography, and interpretation of reports and labels. Seventeen species of Juniperus, three Chamaecyparis, five Cupressus, and one Platycladus are reported as hosts. Infestations on several juniper hosts and all of its non-juniper hosts have resulted from introductions to areas within the natural range of the mistletoe. Juniper dwarf mistletoe is or is potentially an important disease agent in arid forests of numerous countries. Information on its hosts and distribution can help to make good decisions for maintaining forest health and productivity.


Title: New Pubs: July-September 2001
Publish Date: October 31, 2001
Expires: October 31, 2002
Last Update:
March 28, 2007

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