Rocky Mountain Research Station Publications

Rocky Mountain Research Station
New Publications - April-June 2000

This issue lists publications by Station authors and major cooperators in the 3-month period shown above.

TITLE: Monitoring the vegetation resources in riparian areas
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-47
ORDER #:
78

Monitoring the vegetation resources in riparian areas. Winward, Alma H. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-47. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 49 p.

This document provides information on three sampling methods used to inventory and monitor the vegetation resources in riparian areas. The vegetation cross-section method evaluates the health of vegetation across the valley floor. The greenline method provides a measurement of the streamside vegetation. The woody species regeneration method measures the density and age class structure of any shrub or tree species that may be present in the sampling area. Together these three sampling procedures can provide an evaluation of the health of all the vegetation in a given riparian area.

TITLE: Bird communities of gambel oak: A descriptive analysis
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-48
ORDER #:
79

Bird communities of gambel oak: A descriptive analysis. Leidolf, Andreas; Wolfe, Michael L.; Pendleton, Rosemary L. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-48. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 30 p.

Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii Nutt.) covers 3.75 million hectares (9.3 million acres) of the western United States. This report synthesizes current knowledge on the composition, structure, and habitat relationships of gambel oak avian communities. It lists life history attributes of 183 bird species documented from gambel oak habitats of the western United States. Structural habitat attributes important to bird-habitat relationships are identified, based on 12 independent studies. This report also highlights species of special concern, provides recommendations for monitoring, and gives suggestions for management and future research.

TITLE: Forest Insect and Disease Tally System (FINDIT) user manual
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-49
ORDER #:
80

Forest Insect and Disease Tally System (FINDIT) user manual. Bentz, Barbara J. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-49. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 12 p.

FINDIT, the Forest Insect and Disease Tally System, is an easy-to-use tool for analyzing insect and disease population information taken during stand surveys. Incidence of insects, pathogens, and other biotic and abiotic influences on forest ecosystems are summarized using traditional mensurational measurements. Information is summarized by diameter class, tree species, influencing agent, and for the entire stand. Several insect and disease hazard rating systems are also included. FINDIT version 1.2 runs within the Windows platform.

TITLE: Disturbance and climate change in United States/Mexico borderland plant communities: A state-of-the-knowledge review
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-50
ORDER #:
81

Disturbance and climate change in United States/Mexico borderland plant communities: A state-of-the-knowledge review. McPherson, Guy R.; Weltzin, Jake F. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-50. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 24 p.

This review evaluates the effects and importance of disturbance and climate change on plant community dynamics in the United States/Mexico borderlands region. Our primary focus is on knowledge of physiognomic-level change in grasslands and woodlands of southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. Changes in vegetation physiognomy have broad implications for management and land use in the borderlands.

TITLE: Juniper seed sources in the Great Plains
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-51
ORDER #:
82

Juniper seed sources in the Great Plains. Cunningham, Richard A.; King, Rudy M. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-51. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 19 p.

In 1973, the GP-13 Technical Committee of the Great Plains Agricultural Council initiated a cooperative seed-source study of Rocky Mountain juniper and eastern redcedar. The objectives of the study were to: (1) determine the genetic variation of major traits exhibited by both species; (2) identify the best sources of seed for the production of planting stock for use in each state; and (3) provide germplasm of known parentage for use in selection and breeding programs. The results of that study are contained in this report. Managers and conservationists may find the information helpful in determining and choosing the best seed source to produce planting stock for specific planting sites, thus improving the survival and performance of these species in windbreak and conservation plantings throughout the Great Plains.

TITLE: Determining atmospheric deposition in Wyoming with IMPROVE and other national programs
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-52
ORDER #:
83

Determining atmospheric deposition in Wyoming with IMPROVE and other national programs. Zeller, Karl; Harrington, Debra Youngblood; Fisher, Richard; Donev, Evgeny. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-52. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 34 p.

To determine the extent and trends of forest exposure to air pollution, various types of monitoring have been conducted. In this study, we evaluate data from different rural air monitoring programs to determine whether or not they may have wider applications in resource monitoring and protection. This report analyzes location-specific data collected by three national programs: the CASTNET (NDDN) Network supported by the Environmental Protection Agency, the IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of protected Visual Environments) network supported by federal land managers, and the NADP/NTN program supported by many agencies.

TITLE: Fish and other aquatic resource trends in the United States: A technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-53
ORDER #:
84

Fish and other aquatic resource trends in the United States: A technical document supporting the 2000 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment. Loftus, Andrew J.; Flather, Curtis H. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-53. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 50 p.

This report documents the general trends in fisheries and aquatic resources for the nation as required by the Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) of 1974. The report highlights major trends in water quality, specific fish populations, resource utilization, and imperiled aquatic fauna. Relationships between land use, water quality, and aquatic species conditions are explored. An analysis is provided of a multi-state information sharing initiative (MARIS) that the Forest Service has initiated, along with recommendations for the future. The data for the report came primarily from existing state and federal agency data. The report concludes with the implications of these findings for Forest Service strategic planning.

TITLE: Managing for enhancement of riparian and wetland areas of the Western United States: An annotated bibliography
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-54
ORDER #:
85

Managing for enhancement of riparian and wetland areas of the Western United States: An annotated bibliography. Koehler, David A.; Thomas, Allan E., comps. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-54. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 369 p.

This annotated bibliography contains 1,905 citations from professional journals, symposia, workshops, proceedings, technical reports, and other sources. The intent of this compilation was to: (1) assemble, to the extent possible, all available and accessible publications relating to riparian management within a single source or document; (2) provide managers, field biologists, researchers, and others, a point of access for locating scientific literature relevant to their specific interest; and (3) provide, under one cover, a comprehensive collection of annotated publications that could disseminate basic information relative to the status of our knowledge.

TITLE: Modeling large woody debris recruitment for small streams of the Central Rocky Mountains
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-55
ORDER #: 86

Modeling large woody debris recruitment for small streams of the Central Rocky Mountains. Bragg, Don C.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.; Roberts, David W. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-55. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 36 p.

As our understanding of the importance of large woody debris (LWD) evolves, planning for its production in riparian forest management is becoming more widely recognized. This report details the development of a model (CWD, version 1.4) that predicts LWD inputs, including descriptions of the field sampling used to parameterize parts of the model, the theoretical and practical underpinnings of the model's structure, and a case study of CWD's application to a stream in Wyoming's Bridger-Teton National Forest.

TITLE: Heavy thinning of ponderosa pine stands: An Arizona case study
SERIES #:
RMRS-RP-22
ORDER #: 87

Heavy thinning of ponderosa pine stands: An Arizona case study. Ffolliott, Peter F.; Baker, Malchus B., Jr.; Gottfried, Gerald J. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-22. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Growth and structural changes in a mosaic of even-aged ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands were studied for 25 years to determine the long-term impacts of a heavy thinning treatment to a basal-area level of 25 ft2/acre. Basal area and volume growth of these stands has increased since thinning and likely will continue to increase as the residual trees increase in size. Furthermore, future stand integrity should be maintained at relatively low-density levels. It is unlikely, however, that timber production could be sustained at this level. A more plausible scenario is to manage the watershed for other resource values available from ponderosa pine stands.

TITLE: Bird habitat relationships along a Great Basin elevational gradient
SERIES #:
RMRS-RP-23
ORDER #:
88

Bird habitat relationships along a Great Basin elevational gradient. Medin, Dean E.; Welch, Bruce L.; Clary, Warren P. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-23. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 22 p.

Bird censuses were taken on 11 study plots along an elevational gradient ranging from 5,250 to 11,400 feet. Each plot represented a different vegetative type or zone. Eighty-nine bird species were observed. The total number of birds and bird species followed a skewed bell-shaped distribution. Some birds were quite narrow in their choice of vegetative zones while others showed very little selectivity. Both total number of individual birds and bird species appeared to reach highest values in study plots with a substantial component of mountain big sagebrush.

TITLE: Environmental characteristics of the Grand Fir Mosaic and adjacent habitat types
SERIES #:
RMRS-RP-24
ORDER #:
89

Environmental characteristics of the Grand Fir Mosaic and adjacent habitat types. Ferguson, Dennis E.; Byrne, John C. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS- RP-24. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 20 p.

Grand Fir Mosaic habitats differ from adjacent forest habitats in their slow rate of secondary succession to woody vegetation. Remote monitoring stations were used to sample the environment at a Grand Fir Mosaic site and three adjacent habitat types. The Grand Fir Mosaic site has shorter growing seasons, cooler temperatures, and more soil moisture than the other sites. Soil pH at the Grand Fir Mosaic site cycled from 5.5 to 6.5 in winter months to 4.0 to 5.0 in summer months. These unique site and environmental characteristics are shown to cause highly acidic soils with high aluminum availability below pH 5.0.

TITLE: Building consensus: Legitimate hope or seductive paradox?
SERIES #:
RMRS-RP-25
ORDER #:
90

Building consensus: Legitimate hope or seductive paradox? McCool, Stephen F.; Guthrie, Kathleen; Smith, Jane Kapler. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-25. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 14 p.

To understand how participants in a natural resource planning situation described the nature of consensus, we interviewed scientists, agency planners and managers, and public representatives in two planning processes on the Bitterroot National Forest in west-central Montana. While most interviewees felt the agency had included affected interests and felt that the problem could be resolved through public participation, disagreements about the problem definition occurred. Most could "live with" the decision of the agency, but some could not. People varied in their capacity to assimilate the information presented at public meetings. Interviewees varied in their interpretation of whether a consensus was arrived at in the two public involvement processes investigated, but most agreed that it was an essential step in planning.

Limited supply CD-ROM
The following CD-ROM was produced in limited quantities, and is available on first-come-first-serve basis. Loan copies will be available when our supply is depleted.

TITLE: Mapping vegetation and fuels for fire management on the Gila National Forest Complex, New Mexico
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-46-CD
ORDER #:
91

Mapping vegetation and fuels for fire management on the Gila National Forest Complex, New Mexico. Keane, Robert E.; Mincemoyer, Scott A.; Schmidt, Kirsten M.; Long, Donald G.; Garner, Janice L. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-46-CD. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 1 CD-ROM.

This disk contains the fuels and vegetation spatial data layers required by the spatially explicit fire growth model FARSITE (Fire Area Simulator) for all lands in and around the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. U.S.A. Satellite imagery, terrain modeling, and biophysical simulation were used to create three vegetation spatial data layers of biophysical settings, cover types, and structural stages. FARSITE fuels input maps can be used to simulate growth of fires on the Gila National Forest, aiding managers in the planning and allocation of resources for managing fire.


TITLE: New Publications - April-June 2000
Publish Date: November 6, 2000
Expires: November 6, 2001
Last Update:
March 28, 2007

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