Rocky Mountain Research Station Publications

Rocky Mountain Research Station
New Publications - January-March 2000

This issue lists publications by Station authors and major cooperators in the 3-month period shown above.

TITLE: Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on fauna
SERIES #:
RMRS-GTR-42 Vol. 1
ORDER #:
71

Also available electronically at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr42_1.html

Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on fauna. Smith, Jane Kapler. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 1. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 83 p.

The extent of fire effects on animal communities generally depends on the extent of change in habitat structure and species composition caused by fire. Stand-replacement fires usually cause greater changes in the faunal communities of forests than in those of grasslands. Within forests, stand-replacement fires usually alter the animal community more dramatically than understory fires. Animal species are adapted to survive the pattern of fire frequency, season, size, severity, and uniformity that characterized their habitat in presettlement times. When fire frequency increases or decreases substantially or fire severity changes from presettlement patterns, habitat for many animal species declines.

TITLE: Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-43
ORDER #: 72

Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona. Cartron, Jean-Luc E.; Finch, Deborah M. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-43. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 68 p.

This report assesses the state of knowledge related to me conservation status of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona. The population decline of this owl has been attributed to the loss of riparian areas before and after the turn of the 20th century. Currently, the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl is chiefly found in southern Arizona in xeroriparian vegetation and well-structured upland desertscrub. The primary threat to the remaining pygmy-owl population appears to be continued habitat loss due to residential development. Important information gaps exist and prevent a full understanding of the current population status of the owl and its conservation needs.

TITLE: A bank-operated traveling-block cableway for stream discharge and sediment measurements
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-44
ORDER #: 73

A bank-operated traveling block cableway for stream discharge and sediment measurements. Paradiso, James J. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-44. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 36 p.

Streams often present a challenge for collecting flow and sediment measurements on a year-round basis. Streams that can normally be waded become hazardous during seasonal flows, either endangering hydrographers or precluding data collection completely. A hand-operated cableway permits the accurate and safe collection of discharge and sediment data from the stream bank. This system provides a low-cost, safe alternative to cable cars or operation from bridges during high runoff.

TITLE: Representativeness assessment of Research Natural Areas on National Forest System lands in Idaho
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-45
ORDER #: 74

Representativeness assessment of Research Natural Areas on National Forest System lands in Idaho. Rust, Steven K. 2000. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-45. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 129 p.

This report summarizes information on the status of the natural area network and priorities for identification of new Research Natural Areas. Natural distribution and abundance of plant associations is compared to the representation of plant associations within natural areas. Natural distribution and abundance is estimated using modeled potential natural vegetation, published classification and inventory data, and Heritage plant community element occurrence data. Minimum criteria are applied to select only viable, high quality plant association occurrences. In assigning natural area selection priorities, decision rules are applied to encompass consideration of the adequacy and viability of representation. The result of the summary provides an operational prioritization of Research Natural Area needs at landscape and subregional scales.

TITLE: Land stewardship in the 21st century: the contributions of watershed management; 2000 March 13-16; Tucson, AZ
SERIES #: RMRS-P-13
ORDER #: 75

Land stewardship in the 21st century: the contributions of watershed management; 2000 March 13-16; Tucson, AZ. Ffolliott, Peter F.; Baker, Malchus B., Jr.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Dillon, Madelyn C.; Mora, Karen L., tech. coords. 2000. Proc. RMRS-P-13. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 438 p.

The purpose of this conference was to increase awareness through exploration and evaluation of global, national, and regional perspectives about the potential contributions that watershed management can make to the conservation, sustainable development, and use of natural resources in ecosystem-based land stewardship in the 21st century. The synthesis papers were presented in plenary sessions and prepared by invited speakers from public and private research, management, and educational organizations. Over 50 poster papers complemented the synthesis papers to broaden the conference scope.

TITLE: Stream channel responses to streamflow diversion on small streams of the Snake River drainage, Idaho
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-20
ORDER #: 76

Stream channel responses to streamflow diversion on small streams of the Snake River drainage, Idaho. Bohn, Carolyn C.; King, John G. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-20. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 19 p.

The effects on channels of small, low-head seasonal water diversions in the Snake River drainage were investigated. Channels below small diversions were compared to the channels immediately above the same diversions to determine if differences in flow conveyance, substrate sediment size distribution, or streamside vegetation density were present. Use of the edge of vegetation as a channel feature for flow estimates merits further testing. It appears that the operation of the small forest stream diversions studied has not substantially altered most of the parameters studied. Past hydrographs and historical hydrologic data, however, are needed to fully evaluate the channel and vegetation responses.

TITLE: Optimum timeframes for detecting songbird vocalizations in the Black Hills
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-21
ORDER #: 77

Optimum timeframes for detecting songbird vocalizations in the Black Hills. Mills, Todd R.; Rumble, Mark A.; Flake, Lester D. 2000. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Birds are indicators of vegetation structure and ecological conditions. The singing activity of birds declines during late-morning periods, which can affect estimates of abundance and conclusions regarding vegetative conditions indexed by birds. Therefore, it is important to quantify periods of bird activity so biologists can plan studies. We determined hourly detections from singing males of 22 nongame bird species in ponderosa pine, quaking aspen, and grassland vegetation types in the Black Hills of South Dakota. We recommend that bird counts in the Black Hills be completed within 4 hours after sunrise so estimates of bird abundance are not affected by reduced singing among males.


TITLE: New Publications - January-March 2000
Publish Date: May 5, 2000
Expires: May 5, 2000
Last Update:
March 28, 2007

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