Rocky Mountain Research Station Publications

Rocky Mountain Research Station
New Publications - July-September 1999

This issue lists publications by Station authors and major cooperators in the 3-month period shown above.

TITLE: Abundance and characteristics of snags in western Montana forests
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-31
ORDER #: 43

Abundance and characteristics of snags in western Montana forests. Harris, Richard B. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-31. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 19 p.

Plot data from the U.S. Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program was used to characterize the abundance and selected characteristics of snags from forests in western Montana. Plots were grouped by whether they had a history of timber harvest. The U.S. Forest Service classifications of forest type, habitat type, and potential vegetation group were used to characterize plot conditions. Snag abundance was classified by d.b.h. class and species.

TITLE: Habitat relationships of landbirds in the Northern Region, USDA Forest Service
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-32
ORDER #: 44

Habitat relationships of landbirds in the Northern Region, USDA Forest Service. Hutto, Richard L.; Young, Jock S. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-32. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 72 p.

A series of first-generation habitat-relationships models for 83 bird species were detected in a 3-year study on point counts conducted in association with the USDA Forest Service's Northern Region Landbird Monitoring Program. The models depict probabilities of detection for each of the bird species on 100-m-radius, 10-minute point counts conducted across a series of major vegetation cover types. The list of species covered by this program is indeed large enough and ecologically broad enough to help managers predict and monitor the effects of management activities on almost all the major vegetation types in the Region.

TITLE: Wildlife resource trends in the United States: a technical document supporting the 2000 RPA Assessment
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-33
ORDER #: 45

Wildlife resource trends in the United States: a technical document supporting the 2000 RPA Assessment. Flather, Curtis H.; Brady, Stephen J.; Knowles, Michael S. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-33. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 79 p.

This report documents trends in wildlife resources for the nation as required by the Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) of 1974. The report focuses on recent historical trends in wildlife as one indicator of ecosystem health across the United States and updates wildlife trends presented in previous RPA Assessments. The report also shows short- and long-term projections of some wildlife resources, including habitat, population, harvest, and users, set the context within which region-specific trends are presented.

TITLE: White pine in the American West: a vanishing species-can we save it?
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-35
ORDER #: 46

White pine in the American West: a vanishing species-can we save it? Neuenschwander, Leon F.; Byler, James W.; Harvey, Alan E.; McDonald, Geral I.; Ortiz, Denise S.; Osborne, Harold L.; Snyder, Gerry C.; Zack, Arthur. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-35. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 20 p.

Forest scientists ask that everyone, from the home gardener to the forest manager, help revive western white pine by planting it everywhere, even in nonforest environments such as our neighborhood streets, parks, and backyards. White pine, long ago considered the "King Pine," once dominated the moist inland forests of the Northwest, eventually spawning whole industries and historical movements. Now-since the arrival of Euro-Americans and the stubborn blister rust disease-this sun-loving giant barely survives on about 5 percent of its former domain. This is the story of the decline of the magnificent western white pine.

TITLE: Historic avalanches in the northern front range and the central and northern mountains of Colorado
SERIES #:RMRS-GTR-38
ORDER #: 47

Historic avalanches in the northern front range and the central and northern mountains of Colorado. Martinelli, M., Jr.; Leaf, Charles F., comps. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 270 p.

Newspaper accounts of avalanche accidents from the 1860s through 1950 have been compiled, summarized, and discussed. Many of the avalanches that caused fatalities came down rather small, innocuous-looking paths. Land use planners can use historical avalanche information as a reminder of the power of snow avalanches and to assure rational development in the future.

TITLE: Past and future freshwater use in the United States: a technical document supporting the 2000 RPA Assessment
SERIES #:RMRS-GTR-39
ORDER #: 48

Past and future freshwater use in the United States: a technical document supporting the 2000 RPA Assessment. Brown, Thomas C. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-39. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 47 p.

Water use in the United States to the year 2040 is estimated by extending past trends in basic water-use determinants. Those trends are largely encouraging. Over the past 35 years, withdrawals in industry and at thermoelectric plants have steadily dropped per unit of output, and over the past 15 years some irrigated regions have also increased the efficiency of their water use. Further, per-capita domestic withdrawals may have finally peaked. If these trends continue, aggregate withdrawals in the U.S. over the next 40 years will stay below 10% of the 1995 level, despite a 41% expected increase in population. However, not all areas of the U.S. are projected to fare as well. Of the 20 water resource regions in the U.S., withdrawals in seven are projected to increase by from 15% to 30% above 1995 levels.

TITLE: Proceedings: shrubland ecotones; 1998 August 12-14; Ephraim, UT
SERIES #: RMRS-P-11
ORDER #: 49

Proceedings: shrubland ecotones; 1998 August 12-14; Ephraim, UT. McArthur, E. Durant; Ostler, W. Kent; Wambolt, Carl L., comps. 1999. Proc. RMRS-P-11. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 299 p.

The 51 papers in this proceedings include an introductory keynote paper on ecotones and hybrid zones and a final paper describing the mid-symposium field trip as well as collections of papers on ecotones and hybrid zones, population biology, community ecology, and community rehabilitation and restoration. The field trip consisted of descriptions of biology, ecology, and geology of a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) hybrid zone between two subspecies (A. tridentata ssp. tridentata and A. t. ssp. vaseyana) in Salt Creek Canyon, Wasatch Mountains, Uinta National Forest, Utah, and the ecotonal or clinal vegetation gradient of the Great Basin Experimental Range, Manti-La Sal National Forest, Utah, together with its historical significance.

TITLE: A preliminary hazard model of white pine blister rust for the Sacramento Ranger District, Lincoln National Forest
SERIES #: RMRS-RN-6
ORDER #: 50

A preliminary hazard model of white pine blister rust for the Sacramento Ranger District, Lincoln National Forest. Geils, Brian W.; Conklin, David A.; Van Arsdel, Eugene P. 1999. Res. Note RMRS-RN-6. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Since about 1970, an outbreak of blister rust has been increasing in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico and threatens southwestern white pine. To help determine the expected extent and impact of blister rust, we propose a preliminary hazard model for the Sacramento Ranger District. We assume blister rust incidence and severity on white pine varies with microclimate and proximity to telial hosts (certain species of Ribes). We identify the sites at risk and rank them into three relative hazard classes based on elevation, plant association, and topographic position. Studies are underway to test and refine the model.

TITLE: A bibliography for the northern Madrean Biogeographic Province
SERIES #: RMRS-RN-7
ORDER #: 51

A bibliography for the northern Madrean Biogeographic Province. Ffolliott, Peter F.; DeBano, Leonard F.; Gottfried, Gerald J.; Huebner, Daniel P.; Edminster, Carl B., comps. 1999. Res. Note RMRS-RN-7. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 3 p.

An online bibliography was compiled to furnish a literature basis for implementation of land management activities and planning research endeavors in the Madrean Biogeographic Province, which includes the Madrean Archipelago region in the southwestern United States. Citations are listed alphabetically by author in categories appropriate to the subject matter presented. The large number of citations preclude hard-copy publication. The complete bibliography is available on the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station's Flagstaff office web site at: www.rmrs.nau.edu/publications/madrean/

TITLE: Runoff and sediment yield from proxy records: upper Animas Creek Basin, New Mexico
SERIES #:RMRS-RP-18
ORDER #: 52

NOTE: This was also listed in the March-June 1999 New Publications list

Runoff and sediment yield from proxy records: upper Animas Creek Basin, New Mexico. Osterkamp, W. R. 1999. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-18. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 50 p.

Analyses of water- and sediment-yield records from the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, the San Simon Wash Basin, and the Jornada Experimental Range, combined with observations of regional variations in climate, geology and soils, vegetation, topography, fire frequency, and land-use history, allow estimates of present conditions of water and sediment discharges in the upper Animas Creek Basin, New Mexico. Further, the records are used to anticipate fluxes of water and sediment should watershed conditions change.

TITLE: Habitat capability model for birds wintering in the Black Hills, South Dakota
SERIES #: RMRS-RP-19
ORDER #: 53

Habitat capability model for birds wintering in the Black Hills, South Dakota. Rumble, Mark A.; Mills, Todd R.; Flake, Lester D. 1999. Res. Pap. RMRS-RP-19. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 11 p.

The Black Hills National Forest uses the habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy relative to resident wintering bird populations is largely unknown. We tested the model's predictive accuracy for resident nongame birds wintering in 11 vegetation structural stages of ponderosa pine, quaking aspen/paper birch, and meadows in the Black Hills, South Dakota. Six species had HABCAP coefficients for vegetation structural stages during winter. Red crossbills were not previously included in the model, so we developed HABCAP coefficients for them. Predicted abundance of winter birds in vegetation structural stages based on HABCAP coefficients differed from observed abundance. HABCAP coefficients were modified to reflect observed abundance patterns of birds. These changes to HABCAP coefficients should provide managers with more appropriate estimates of land management impacts on nongame birds wintering in the Black Hills.

TITLE: Coram Experimental Forest: 50 years of research in a western larch forest
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-37
ORDER #: 54

NOTE: This is available in limited supplies on a first-come first-served basis.

Coram Experimental Forest: 50 years of research in a western larch forest. Shearer, Raymond C.; Kempf, Madelyn M. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-37. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 66 p.

Major research at Coram includes the regeneration of young forests and the interaction of flora, fauna, and water to a wide range of forest treatments. The Coram Experimental Forest is used cooperatively by Federal, university, and private scientists. About 340 ha of the forest are designated as the Coram Research Natural Area where virgin conditions are permanently maintained for research and monitoring. Coram, designated a Biosphere Reserve in 1976, is part of an international network that is devoted to the conservation of nature and scientific research in the service of humans.

TITLE: Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-30WWW
ORDER #: Available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr30.html

Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States. Ruggiero, L. F.; Aubry, K. B.; Buskirk, S. W.; Koehler, G.; Krebs, C. J.; McKelvey, K. S.; Squires, J. R., tech. eds. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-30WWW. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

Once found throughout the Rockies and forests of the northern states, the lynx now hides in pockets of its former range. This publication reviews the newest scientific knowledge of the cat's history, distribution, and ecology. As the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service prepares to make a final decision about listing the lynx as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, objective science is presented. While the authors exhibit the latest preliminary research results on lynx and make some qualified insights into lynx management, the publication's intent is to assess the science of lynx. NOTE: This publication will also be published hard copy by the University of Colorado Press later this year. It is currently available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr30.html

TITLE: User's guide to FBASE: relational database software for managing R1/R4 (Northern/Intermountain Regions) fish habitat inventory data
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-34WWW
ORDER #: Available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr34.html

User's guide to FBASE: relational database software for managing R1/R4 (Northern/Intermountain Regions) fish habitat inventory data. Wollrab, Sherry P. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-34WWW. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

FBASE is a microcomputer relational database package that handles data collected using the R1/R4 Fish and Fish Habitat Standard Inventory Procedures (Overton and others 1997). FBASE contains standard data entry screens, data validations for quality control, data maintenance features, and summary report options. This program also prepares data for importation into an ARC/INFO Geographic Information System. Users have easy access to their habitat inventory data in both a raw and summarized format. FBASE is a stand-alone program and has minimal requirements for RAM and hard drive space, making it feasible for running on most systems. The data tables are in a format that makes them easily transportable to other software programs if users wish to further analyze their data or produce custom reports.

TITLE: An analysis of PILT-related payments and likely property tax liability of Federal resource management lands
SERIES #: RMRS-GTR-36WWW
ORDER #: Available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr36.html

An analysis of PILT-related payments and likely property tax liability of Federal resource management lands. Schuster, Ervin G.; Beckley, Paul R.; Bushur, Jennifer M.; Gebert, Krista M.; Niccolucci, Michael J. 1999. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-36WWW. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

As part of the FY 1996 appropriation process, the United States Congress directed the USDI Bureau of Land Management to provide information on (1) the equivalency between Federal payments on resource management lands and likely property taxes those lands could generate; (2) the benefits and costs to local governments resulting from the presence of Federal lands; and (3) recommendations for amending the Payments In Lieu of Taxes (PILT) legislation and related revenue-sharing programs. This publication reports the research resulting from that directive. Indications are that the overall tax liability on Federal lands is almost three times the Federal payments. A survey of county executive officers indicates that the direct fiscal costs or benefits to county governments from Federal lands and programs are modest.


Title: New Publications - July-September 1999
Publish Date: January 13, 2000
Expires: January 13, 2001
Last Update:
March 28, 2007

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