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 Sustaining Alpine and Forest Ecosystems
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Linda Joyce
Rocky Mountain Research Station
240 West Prospect
Fort Collins, CO 80526
Phone: 970-498-2560
ljoyce@fs.fed.us
 United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service.USDA logo which links to the department's national site.Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.
Fire  

 

 
PATTERNS OF WHITE PINE REGENERATION AFTER FIRE
Research Description - White pine is an important species that regenerates after fire, helps in reducing soil erosion, and sets the stage for the development of commercially valuable forest types. White pine is also susceptible to white pine blister rust that can kill seedlings and adult trees. Researchers are working on identifying and selecting sources of white pine seeds that display hardiness and resistance to the pathogen so that they may be used in efforts to restore burned areas.
National Fire Plan Key Point – B (Rehabilitation and Restoration)
Team Lead Scientist – Anna Schoettle; aschoettle@fs.fed.us, 970-498-1333
Research Approach – Apply ecological, physiological, genetic and meta-population approaches to improve our ability to develop and assess potential management and conservation options for white pine ecosystems.
USE OF REMOTE SENSING TO EXAMINE DISEASE EFFECTS ON FUEL PATTERNS
Research Description – Forests impacts by insects and diseases are more susceptible to wildfires. Researchers are using satellite imagery to look at the impacts of these disturbances in determining the distribution of fire hazard and spread of wildfire. This information will be incorporated into an expert opinion model that can be used to help managers make operational decisions about management options.
National Fire Plan Key Point – C (Hazardous Fuels Reduction)
Team Lead Scientist – John Lundquist, jlundquist@fs.fed.us; 970-498-1095
Research Approach – We developed methods to generate sub-stand resolution spatial models of various components of fuel loading by linking field data to satellite imagery, linked these images to fire spread model, developed methods to quantify the relative importance of different types of disturbances, which generate fuels and assessed the relative importance of diseases, and examine how marketing and promotional business tools and concepts might be usefully integrated into this process.
   
MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR FIRE DEPENDENT ECOSYSTEMS IN COLORADO AND THE BLACK HILLS
Research Description –Fire suppression and exclusion throughout the Central Rocky Mountains have resulted in conditions that make the risk of catastrophic fires likely. Researchers are gathering information on the types and methods of fuel reduction alternatives that would be best suited to treating these high fuel levels to restore a more natural mix of ecological conditions and reintroduce fire as a management tool.
National Fire Plan Key Point – C (Hazardous Fuels Reduction)
Team Lead Scientist – Linda Joyce; ljoyce@fs.fed.us, 970-498-2560
Research Approach – Information and knowledge will be developed (1) on the role of natural disturbances and forest management activities in maintaining healthy forests ecosystems in the West; (2) on the ecological response of these fire-suppressed ecosystems to natural disturbances of insects, disease, and timber management treatments, including regeneration patterns, seedling establishment, endemic levels of insects and disease, and responses in the forests’ nutrient and carbon dynamics. Additionally, we will focus on the development of effective and cost-efficient vegetation manipulation techniques to mimic the fire disturbances when fire is not a viable alternative by establishing benchmarks for the current ecosystem processes, determining the direction of change in these ecological processes, and the development and testing of management treatments to maintain a broader spectrum of ecological conditions along the Front Range and Black Hills and develop and test where possible, management techniques that make fire a viable option for resource management.
ROLE OF WILDLAND FIRE AND SUBSEQUENT INSECT ATTACK ON PONDEROSA PINE MORTALITY
Issues are the impacts of insects and fire on recovery of ponderosa pine ecosystems after fire.
Develop guidelines for field personnel to determine whether a tree will live or die in the near-term future in relation to the amount of damage caused by fire or the probability of fire-injured trees being killed by insects.
Cooperative study with Region 2 Forest Health Management, Region 3, Forest Health Protection, Region 1 Forest Health Protection and Rocky Mountain Research Station, funded through the Special Technology and Development Program.
To help define the impact of insects on western forest ecosystems for managing vegetation.
Forest Service Special Technology and Development Program Forest Health Management in the Rocky Mountains
RECOVERY OF MANAGED PONDEROSA PINE STAND AFTER THE HAYMAN FIRE AT THE MANITOU EXPERIMENTAL FOREST
Research Description – The Hayman Fire in 2002 burned through two long-term research studies at the Manitou Experimental Forest. Post-fire recovery studies have been overlain on the ponderosa pine regeneration study which was established in 1982. At the start of the study, two overstory treatments were imposed on two soil preparation treatments and half of the area was planted with pine and half were left to follow natural regeneration. Seed production and seedling initiation has been followed for each of the 20 years since establishment.
National Fire Plan Key Point – C (Hazardous Fuels Reduction)
Team Lead Scientist – Linda Joyce; ljoyce@fs.fed.us, 970-498-2560, and Wayne Shepperd, wshepperd@fs.fed.us , 970-498-1259
Research Approach: Describe and quantify the recovery of the long-term study plots on the Manitou Experimental Forest
Manitou Experimental Forest Ponderosa Pine Regeneration Study Hayman Fire Case Study Analysis
IMPROVING MODEL ESTIMATES OF SMOKE CONTRIBUTION TO REGIONAL HAZE
Research Description - Evaluating potential contributions of smoke dispersion, transport and deposition to regional haze from wildland and prescribed fire is difficult and costly, especially for Class I areas. This study adapts and develops existing monitoring systems to measure pollutants contributing to regional haze, ozone, and nitrogen deposition. These systems will be robust, low-cost and useful for sampling in remote areas, making them beneficial for both local plume dispersion measures and regional haze assessments. This study was funded by the Joint Fire Sciences.
Joint Fire Science Study
Co-Investigator: Robert Musselman; rmusselman@fs.fed.us, 970-498-1239.
Research Approach: Adapt the various existing filter pack, denuder and passive monitoring systems for remote site smoke sampling systems to measure pollutants contributing to regional haze, ozone, and nitrogen deposition.
   
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