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Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems
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  • Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems
  • 333 Broadway SE. Suite 115
  • Albuquerque, NM 87102-3497
  • 505-724-3660
  • 505-724-3688 (fax)

Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems

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GSDUpdate: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2013 Research by the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program
GSD Update

GSDUpdate: Year in Review: Spotlight on 2013 Research by the Grassland,Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (February 2014): We take a look back at selected studies of the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems Science Program (GSD) that depict its strengths and focus areas. Significant results of recent research and science delivery by GSD scientists are highlighted. More »

Previous issues »

Symposium: Ecology and Management of the Blackbrush Ecosystem

A special symposium, Ecology and Management of the Blackbrush Ecosystem, was held in conjunction with the 12th Biennial Conference of Science and Management on the Colorado Plateau, September 16-19, 2013, Northern Arizona University. Research Ecologist Susan Meyer, RMRS, and Todd Esque, USGS, organized the symposium, and six RMRS scientists and additional university faculty and students gave oral presentations. A book proposal based on the presented papers has been accepted by Springer-Verlag Press and will be published next year. View the symposium topics »

Saguaro cactus in Sabino Canyon in southeastern Arizona
Larry Jones, US Forest Service
Saguaro cactus in Sabino Canyon in southeastern Arizona: Saguaro is one of the plant species that typifies Sonoran Desert areas of the Coronado National Forest. GSD biologists conducted an assessment of vulnerability of species to climate change that included animal species that occur in such areas.

Welcome to the Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystems (GSD) Program of the Rocky Mountain Research Station.

The Big Picture

Grassland, shrubland, and desert ecosystems are under threat from disturbances, invasive species, and climate change. These ecosystems provide considerable value in the form of wildlife habitat, clean air and water, biological diversity and recreation.

What We Do

We develop and deliver scientific knowledge, technology and tools that will enable people to sustain and restore grasslands, shrublands, and deserts under increasing threats from expanding human-related uses, invasive species, changing disturbance patterns, and climate changes.

Research by Subject Area

Our scientists perform relevant and timely research in five focal areas: disturbance, invasive species, restoration, ecosystem sustainability and management, and climate change.

Research by Ecoregions

Our science teams perform research in three ecoregions in western North America and other ecosystems around the world. These eco-regions cover vast areas of the western landscapes where our teams tackle multiple threats to ecosystem sustainability.

Who We Are

Seed harvesting in Idaho
Photo: Scott Jensen, US Forest Service
Hesperostipa comata (needle and thread grass) seed harvesting with a Flail-vac seed stripper.

The GSD program consists of scientists, professionals, technicians and support staff with diverse expertise in the biological, social, and natural resource sciences. We work in collaboration with universities, municipal, state and federal natural resources agencies, non-government organizations, and other research and management institutions. Members of the GSD staff are located at 7 laboratories in 6 states in the intermountain West (Provo, UT, Reno, NV), Rocky Mountains (Boise and Moscow, ID), northern Great Plains (Bozeman, MT, Rapid City, SD), and American Southwest (Albuquerque, NM). GSD employees also manage the Great Basin Experimental Range and the Desert Experimental Range and serve as liaisons to research natural areas within the geographic region covered by the Rocky Mountain Research Station.