Search
Forest and Woodland Ecosystems Science Program
Contact Information
  • Forest and Woodland Ecosystems Science Program
  • Southwest Forest Science Complex
  • 2500 South Pine Knoll
  • Flagstaff, AZ 86001-6381
  • Alison Hill 928-556-2105
You are here: FWE Home / Research Subject Areas / Disturbance Ecology

Research – Disturbance Ecology

Overview of Research

Fire scars on ponderosa pines, Colorado Front Range foothills
Fire scars on ponderosa pines, Colorado Front Range foothills

Scientists in the Program study the effects of many disturbances on forest and woodlands ecosystems, including fire, insect outbreaks, aspen decline, fire suppression and climate change.

Ongoing Projects

Fire history and Stand Structure in Mixed Conifer Forests of the Colorado Front Range

1000 years of fire history and stand development in montane forests shows considerable variability in fire frequency and intensity over time and considerable spatial variability in species dominance as a result of the complex and variable disturbance regime.

For more information, contact Laurie Huckaby.

Ecological Type Conversions in Colorado Mixed Conifer Forests Driven by Disturbance and Climate

Evidence of climate-driven shifts in mid-elevation forests from dominance by ponderosa pine during the Medieval Warm Period to dominance by lodgepole pine during the Little Ice Age following stand-replacing disturbances.

For more information, contact Laurie Huckaby.

Can local fire histories be used as tools for restoration across larger geographic regions?

Comparison of tree-ring chronologies and historical fire regimes across a latitudinal gradient in the Colorado Front Range.

For more information, contact Laurie Huckaby.

Historic Fire Regimes and Native American Influences in the Foothills of the Northern Colorado Front Range

1000 years of fire history and Native American archaeology suggest that Native American burning drove the local fire regime before the advent of horses.

For more information, contact Laurie Huckaby.

Connecting Climate and Lodgepole Pine Mortality during Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak in High-Elevation Forests

Were beetle killed trees stressed by early 21st century drought and therefore susceptible to attack by mountain pine beetles, or was the climate effect stronger on the beetles than on the trees?

For more information, contact Laurie Huckaby.

Scientists

Scientists conducting research in this category include:

Battaglia, Mike A    Research Forester    970-498-1286
Bentz, Barbara J    Research Entomologist    435-755-3577
Fornwalt, Paula J    Research Ecologist    970-498-2581
Hansen, Matt    Entomologist    435-755-3575
Huckaby, Laurie Kay Stroh     Ecologist    970-498-1298
Hudak, Andrew T    Research Forester    208-883-2327
Jain, T B    Research Forester    208-883-2331
Moser, W Keith    Research Forester    928-556-2046
Negron, Jose    Research Entomologist    970-498-1252
Overby, Steven T    Soil Scientist    928-556-2184
Owen, Suzanne M    Chemist    928-556-2193
Ryan, Michael G    Volunteer Research Ecologist    970-498-1012
Schoettle, Anna W    Research Plant Ecophysiologist    970-498-1333
Sieg, Carolyn H    Research Plant Ecologist    928-556-2151