RMRS Air, Water, & Aquatic Environments Science Program US Forest Service - RMRS Air, Water, & Aquatic Environments Science Program

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About the Rocky Mountain Research Station
   

AWAE Program Headquarters
322 East Front St., Ste 401

Boise, ID 83702

(208) 373-4340

 


Rocky Mountain Research Station Headquarters

2150 Centre Ave., Bldg A
Fort Collins, CO 80526

(970) 295-5923

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service.

USDA Link Forest Service Link

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AWAE Home | Field Units | Research Subjects | Publication Search | Contact Us
 

 

Aquatic Ecology: awae research subject areas


Trout The interdisciplinary scientific study of the distribution and abundance of organisms and their interactions with their environment (external abiotic and biotic factors) is known as ecology. The most prevalent research topics within AWAE include: Bark Beetle research, invasive species, conservation, restoration ecology, fire ecology, riparian environments and more.

Scientists (profile pages)

bulletKate Dwire

bulletRobert Hubbard

bulletHugo Magana

bulletRuss Thurow

Collaborative:

bulletJohn Buffington

bulletDan Isaak

bulletMichael Young

Subcategories(quick jump)

bulletFisheries

bulletStream Temperature

bulletRivers and Water


featured Science

 

Fisheries

 

Bull Trout and Climate Change image

Bull Trout and Climate Change - Risks, Uncertainties and Opportunities for Mapping the Future

Bull trout are a federally listed, native charr species distributed throughout the Pacific Northwest. Among the critical requirements for this species are a need for large, interconnected habitats of cold water. Much uncertainty exists regarding the future of bull trout and their habitats given environmental trends associated with a warming climate and increasing fire activity. Presentations at this symposium provide an overview of bull trout, their relationship to climate, and alternatives for modeling future habitat and population distributions.

 

Videos and Abstracts of the 2008 Western Division Meeting of the American Fisheries Society

 

 

Bull Trout Monitoring image

Monitoring Bull Trout Populations

Bull trout are native to much of the Pacific Northwest, but population declines during the 20th century prompted listing under the Endangered Species Act. Several national forests have also selected bull trout as a Management Indicator Species, which makes monitoring a priority. Monitoring protocols have traditionally focused on tracking site level abundance, but these approaches can be costly to apply across broad areas and are being replaced in some instances by distributional monitoring. Researchers at the Boise Aquatic Sciences Lab have adapted distributional approaches for bull trout to create a monitoring protocol that can be applied rapidly and inexpensively while providing powerful trend detection across broader areas relevant to land management.

 

Science Briefing  |  A Watershed-scale Monitoring Protocol for Bull Trout (RMRS-GTR-224)

 

 

Bull Trout Monitoring image

Climate Change and Rocky Mountain Native Trout

Rapidly warming climates across the Rocky Mountains threatens many populations of native fishes. Models predict large reductions in native trout across the Rocky Mountains in the 21st century.

 

Science Briefing 

 

 

Species Distribution Uncertainty

Species Distribution Uncertainty

Forecast of species distributions under future climates are inherently uncertain; nonetheless, uncertainty in species distributions should be taken into consideration in conservation planning and reserve design.

 

Science Briefing

 

 

Movement and Capture Efficiency of Radio-Tagged Salmonids

Movement and Capture Efficiency of Radio-Tagged Salmonids

RMRS fishery biologists assess how characteristics of radio-tagged fish and habitat influence the probability and extent of movement and probability of capture during electrofishing.

 

Science Briefing

 


Nonnative Fish Removal (SEE FISHERIES)

 
Stream Temperature

 

 

 

Stream Temperature Modeling


Stream Temperature Modeling

Stream thermal regimes are important within regulatory contexts and strongly affect aquatic ecosystems. Numerous approaches have been developed for modeling stream temperatures, but broad application of these models to USFS lands has been constrained by data limitations and poor predictive ability. RMRS scientists have developed an approach to modeling stream temperatures that requires a minimum of field effort by using existing temperature records in combination with GIS and remote sensing technologies. The approach is being applied in a central Idaho watershed to map thermal habitat networks for native fish species, but could also be used to forecast future habitat distributions, improve understanding of factors affecting stream temperatures, determine compliance with water quality standards, or optimize temperature sampling strategies. 

Science Briefing  |  Stream Temperature Modeling and Monitoring Website

 

 

 

Using Underwater Epoxy To Install Temperature Sensors

 

Using Underwater Epoxy To Install Temperature Sensors

Thermal regimes are a fundamental attribute of stream ecosystems and the ability to monitor and model these regimes are rapidly advancing. With a simple protocol that uses underwater epoxy to attach sensors, more than 500 new monitoring sites were established from 2010 to 2012 in rivers and streams across the Rocky Mountains.

 

Science Briefing

   

 

 

 

River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT)

River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT)

Traditional techniques for describing and understanding aquatic physical habitat in streams have focused on manual measurements of channel topography. New remote sensing techniques, such as airborne water-penetrating Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and boat-mounted acoustic sensors can produce highly accurate Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) with continuous coverage of long segments of channels and stream networks. The US Forest Service and ESSA Technologies have developed a suite of GIS tools, the River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT), for processing high resolution DEMs of channels. Our goal is to characterize in-stream and floodplain geomorphology to support aquatic habitat analyses and numerical models of flow and sediment transport. The (RBT) is available for free and is under active development.

 

River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT) | Science Briefing

 

 

 

Stream Isotherm Shifts From Climate Change

 

Stream Isotherm Shifts From Climate Change

Distributions of some species already appear to be shifting to cooler areas (higher elevations and poleward) in response to climate change.

 

 

Science Briefing

   
Rivers and Water

 

 

 

Carbon Storage in Mountain Rivers


Carbon Storage in Mountain Rivers

 

Estimates of riverine carbon storage represent a previously undocumented but important carbon sink.

 

Science Briefing

 
 

 

Precipitation Declines In Pacific Northwest Mountains

Precipitation Declines In Pacific Northwest Mountains

High-elevation climate trends in the Pacific Northwest show that streamflow declines are linked to decreases and changes in wind patterns that bring precipitation to mountains.

 

Science Briefing

 

 

Forest Biomass Utilization and Watershed Processes

Forest Biomass Utilization and Watershed Processes

Forest biomass utilization can be used to improve forest health and decrease the risk of wildfire, both of which improve watershed health.

 

Science Briefing

 
 

 

Detecting Rare Species Using Environmental DNA (eDNA)

Detecting Rare Species Using Environmental DNA

Environmental DNA is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare or difficult to detect species.

 

Science Briefing

 
 

 

 

 

 

Research Subject Areas

 

AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS AND....

 

bulletAquatic Ecology

bulletAtmospheric Sciences

bulletBiogeochemistry

bulletClimate Change

bullet

Engineering

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Fire & Fuels

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Fisheries

bullet

Geomorphology

bullet

Hydrology

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Plant Physiology

bulletSediment & Erosion

bulletSpatial Analysis

bulletWater & Watershed Processes

 

Resources

 

Stream Temperature Modeling Website


River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT)

 

Sediment Transport data

 

Bull Trout and Climate Change - Risks, Uncertainties and Opportunities for Mapping the Future

 

 

Western Watersheds and Climate Change Workshop - November 17-19, 2009


 

Rocky Mountain Research Station - Air, Water and Aquatic Environments Sciences Program
Last Modified:  Thursday, 03 April 2014 at 18:36:34 CDT 3 April, 2014

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