Search
US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
You are here: Home / People / Profile

Profile

Todd Ristau

Todd Ristau

Research Ecologist
PO Box 267
Irvine, PA 16329
Phone: 814-563-1040
Fax: 814-563-1048
Contact Todd Ristau


Current Research

  • My research has focused on recovery of herbaceous vegetation following forest management. I have worked on developing methods for sampling herbaceous plants and am involved in two studies assessing the impact of herbicide application on recovery of herbs.
  • I am investigating the role of buried seed as a mechanism in vegetation recovery. I am interested in recognizing silvicultural problems and opportunities during the early stem exclusion phase of stand development and have studied the role of pin cherry during that phase.
  • I am currently analyzing data from a long-term cleaning/crop tree release study established in 1936 on the Kane Experimental Forest.

Research Interests

  • I will continue to monitor herbaceous plant communities following management activities to determine what changes might occur and whether these changes are permanent or temporary.
  • I plan to work with others to recognize the conditions that result in monoculture following overstory removal and to apply existing silvicultural practices in ways to promote mixed species regeneration. Understanding the competitive ability of species like black birch, black cherry, and pin cherry are important. Understanding establishment requirements and creating conditions favorable for species like cucumber, yellow-poplar, white ash, red maple, and sugar maple to become established where possible is also critical.

Why This Research is Important

Our mission is to enhance the basic understanding of Allegheny Plateau forest ecosystems and to develop resource management guidelines. Understanding how management activities alter the herbaceous plant community in stands under a variety of management strategies is critical to the practice of ecosystem management. Understanding the competitive ability of species like black birch, black cherry, and pin cherry are important. Understanding establishment requirements and creating conditions favorable for species like cucumber tree, yellow-poplar, white ash, red maple, and sugar maple to become established where possible is critical.

Education

  • The State University of New York, College of Env. Sci. and For., Ph.D. Plant Ecology, 2010
  • The Pennsylvania State University, MS Forest Science, 1997
  • Houghton College, BS Biology, 1991

Professional Organizations

  • Ecological Society of America (1995 - Present)
  • Torrey Botanical Society (1998 - Present)
  • Society of American Foresters (1995 - Present)

Featured Publications & Products

Publications & Products

Research Highlights

HighlightTitleYear


NRS-2011-02
Long-Term Differences in Forests With Different Deer Densities

Thirty years after a study on the effects of deer on forest ecosystems established new forest stands at deer densities ranging from 10 to 64 dee ...

2011


NRS-2013-064
Scientists Study Long-term Response of Ground Beetle Communities to an Operational Herbicide Application

Ground beetles comprise a large and diverse group of mostly predatory beetles that have long been recognized as a useful barometer of ecosystem ...

2013


Last updated on : 05/06/2014