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US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Profile

John Lundquist

Supervisory Forest Entomologist
Anchorage, AK
Phone: 907-743-9453

Curriculum vitae (158 KB PDF)


Current Research

Current research focuses on epidemiology and impact assessment of forest insect pests and diseases in northern and high elevation forests. Some specific areas of current emphasis include:

1) Landscape scale spatial analysis and modeling of forest insect pests.

2) Development of methods to assess forest pest impacts on ecosystem services.

3) Use of insect pests as bio-indicators of climate change.

Research Interests

Forest Entomlogy, Forest Pathology, Landscape Ecology, Disturbance Ecology, Ecological Economics, Science Delivery, Science Marketing, Research Valuation

Why This Research is Important

1) Landscape scale spatial analysis and modeling of forest insect pests: Because of its immense size, only a small percentage of the forested area in Alaska is accessible by roads. As a consequence, estimates of pest extent, distribution and impacts are mostly made from data collected in surveys from airplanes. Total area covered during current surveys can be only a small fraction of the actual forested land area. An obvious source of error arises from predicting pest conditions where the plane does not fly. The size of this error can be significant, and pest incidence, severity and distributions are almost certainly underestimated. These estimates are nonetheless used in regional and national summaries for pest condition reporting. Statewide and national estimates of pest impacts would be much more accurate if survey areas not flown could be assessed. I have approached this by exploring ways to use spatial analysis and predictive spatial modeling. The specific objective of one of these studies is to determine how existing aerial survey methods and results can be integrated with recently developed spatial modeling techniques to predict insect pest distributions in remote areas of Alaska where aerial surveys are logistically difficult, expensive, and currently impractical.

2) Development of methods to assess forest pest impacts on ecosystem services: The demands for sustainable management of water, recreation, wildlife habitat, and other non-timber ecosystem services have increased dramatically recently, and the kinds of ecological and socioeconomic impacts that insects, diseases, and invasive plants have become increasingly complex. Not all impacts are negative. In fact, some impacts are important in sustaining ecosystems. Furthermore, different human communities react differently to the same levels of forest damage. Linking the effects of biological threats to non-timber resources and ecosystem services or to processes that maintain sustainability is increasingly needed by managers to make informed decisions. I have approached this by exploring methods of assessing impacts of biotic disturbances on migratory birds, small mammals, fuels, timber-production; developed metrics to measure impacts on multiple resources; and adapted analysis methods for quantifying and partitioning the indirect and direct effects of interacting pests.

3) Use of insect pests as bio-indicators of climate change: Because of its unique geographic position at the northern edge of various forest types where ecosystems are notably sensitive to changing environment, the subarctic forests of Alaska and other circumpolar regions worldwide are vulnerable to changes in large-scale environmental conditions, including, of course, climate change. Since most insects are sensitive to temperature, they will probably play a major role in shifting vegetation dynamics resulting from such environmental events. No one is exactly sure how these shifts will manifest themselves over landscapes. A major challenge in this type of work is how to quantify change, and what metrics could be used to best portray the relationships between these changes and large-scale environmental changes, like climate. One approach taken involves assessing the utility of common forest insect pests as bio-indicators of large-scale environmental changes using the wide range of latitude in Alaska as a surrogate for long-term changing climatic conditions. The practical aim is to develop a metric based on forest insect pests that will subsequently be used in a long-term monitoring program to follow climate change and its effects on forest insect pest dynamics in Alaska.

Education

  • Colorado State University, MBA Business Administration; Certificate in Finance, 2005, 2002
  • University of Georgia, Ph.D Plant Pathology, 1979
  • Yale University, MF Forest Pathology and Tree Physiology, 1976
  • University of Washington, BS Forestry, 1974

Professional Experience

  • Supervisory Forest Entomologist, Region 10, USDA Forest Service, R 10 Forest Health Protection, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station, Anchorage, AK
    2006 - Current
  • Research Plant Pathologist,, USDA Forest Service. Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, CO.
    1991 - 2006
  • Plant Pathologist, USDA Forest Service, Forest Pest Management, R-2. Rapid City Service Center, Rapid City. SD.
    1990 - 1991
  • Research Associate, Department of Horticulture, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND.
    1988 - 1990
  • Research Plant Pathologist, Plant Protection Research Institute, Stellenbosch and Sabie, South Africa.
    1982 - 1988

Professional Organizations

  • Colorado State University, Faculty Associate (1999 - Current)
    Participated in graduate student committees
  • Colorado State University, Faculty Associate (1992 - Current)
    Participated in graduate student committees
  • Society of American Foresters, Member (2009 - 2011)
    Participated in identifying and selected relevant issues.
  • Society of American Foresters, Co-Chair (2009 - 2009)
    Organized oral presentation sessions, selected moderators and speakers.
  • Society of American Foresters, Chair (2007 - 2009)
    Coordinated various tasks
  • Entomological Society of America, Co-Director (2008 - 2008)
    Participate in divisional society events.
  • Society of American Foresters, Co-Chair (2008 - 2008)
    Organized oral presentation sessions, selected moderators and speakers.
  • American Phytopathological Society, Member (2004 - 2007)
    Participated various tasks associated with science issues
  • American Phytopathological Society, Chair (2001 - 2007)
    Facilitated activities of section
  • Society of American Foresters, Chair (2003 - 2004)
    Facilitated the activities of the Working Group
  • American Phytopathological Society, Member (2001 - 2004)
    Participated various committee tasks
  • Society of American Foresters, Vice Chairman (2002 - 2003)
    Facilitated the activities of the Working Group
  • American Phytopathological Society, Chair (1997 - 2003)
    Participated in activities of committee
  • Society of American Foresters, Secretary (2001 - 2002)
    Participated in the leadership activities of the Working Group
  • American Phytopathological Society, Member (1999 - 2001)
    Participated various committee tasks associated with regional and national conventions
  • American Phytopathological Society, Chair (1998 - 1998)
    Facilitated activities of committee
  • South Dakota School Of Mines And Technology, Faculty Associate (1990 - 1992)
    Participated in department affairs

Awards & Recognition

  • Regional Forester's Award for Partnerships, 2010
    Working with partners, training, and technology transfer
  • Rocky Mountain Research Station Certificate of Merit, 2000
    For conveying research results to managers
  • Rocky Mountain Research Station Certificate of Merit, 1999
    Extra effort in the transfer of research results
  • Colorado State University Certificat of Appreciation, 1998
    For dedicated research in forest health and support of the graduate program.

Publications & Products

Research Highlights

HighlightTitleYear


PNW-2012-14
Predicting the Path of the Amber-Marked Birch Leaf Miner

Scientists model future infestation of an invasive insect in Anchorage, AK

2012


Last updated on : 06/27/2014