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US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Forester

W. Keith Moser

Research Forester
2500 S. Pine Knoll Drive
Flagstaff, AZ 86001-6381
Phone: 928-556-2046
Fax: 928-556-2121
Contact W. Keith Moser


Current Research

I am a Research Forester in the Rocky Mountain Research Station's Forests and Woodland Ecosystems Science Program located in Flagstaff, AZ. I plan and conduct research with an emphasis on knowledge of the adaptive capacity of Forest and Woodland species, populations, communities and ecosystems to new and variable weather and disturbance conditions. In the context of applied ecology and silviculture, I develop the overall strategy and approach to the problem, establish priorities among possible studies to fill knowledge gaps, coordinate cooperative efforts, and manage budgets and personnel. This work is disseminated via refereed journals, Forest Service research outlets (e.g., general technical reports and research papers), and published conference proceedings. Furthermore, I provide technology transfer on behalf of the Program via tours, workshops, and demonstrations available to foresters (public, private, and industrial), students, visiting scientists, and public. I am also the Scientist in Charge (SIC) of the Fort Valley Experimental Forest. I manage day-to-day activities and research. In this role, I have several other duties include implementing and administering a safety program, developing and updating a Business Plan for the Experimental Forest, formulating and Project Work Plan, participating in the Stations’ Experimental Forest and Range Coordination Committee, and conducting field tours, workshops, and other educational and training events in the Experimental Forest. I also have responsibilities for coordinating intra- and extramural research and resulting activities that are conducted on the Experimental Forest. Currently, I am investigating relationships between species and structural diversity vs. productivity, patterns of forest response to abiotic and biotic (including non-native invasives) disturbances, and different metrics of long-term sustainability. As part of an international research group interested in ungulate-forest relationships, I am looking at interactions between deer, non-native invasive plants, and forest regeneration. I am working on landscape change resulting from afforestation of pastoral landscapes after de facto abandonment. I am also interested in managing for multiple benefits of agroforestry landscapes.

 

 

Research Interests

I am very interested in disturbance and ecosystem stability and how management actions can impact stability at the stand, landscape, and regional level. As part of this theme, I am interested in issues related to climate impacts, forest health, and invasives, both native and nonnative. I am interested in examining the likelihood of biotic disturbances and the forest structures that result, along with devising strategies for avoidance or amelioration.

Why This Research is Important

Coming from a forest management background, I am interested in the connection between ecological processes and policy and management actions. Research in forest ecology often finds itself constrained to a particular scale: individual plant, landscape, biome or region. If the latest knowledge is to be properly transferred to on-the-ground actions, then one must translate said knowledge into a scale and format that is useful to managers. Whether using imagery from satellites, FIA data or stand exams, then end result must be an action (on non-action) on the ground that promotes the goals and objectives of the landowner. My intent is to document trends in landscape change and, in so doing, examine patterns of disturbance and sustainability across spatial scales, thus providing value to local foresters seeking explanations for observations of disturbance, health, growth, and structure on their properties.

Education

  • Yale University, D.F. (Doctor of Forestry) Forest stand dynamics and ecophysiology, 1994
  • Duke University, M.F. (Master of Forestry) Forest productivity, 1986
  • Duke University, M.B.A. Operations management, 1982
  • North Carolina State University, B.A. Business management, 1980

Professional Experience

  • Adjunct Forestry Faculty, Northern Arizona University
    2014 - Current
  • Adjunct Professor of Forestry, University of Minnesota
    2004 - 2013
  • Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri
    2002 - 2004
  • Adjunct Professor of Forestry, University of Florida
    1996 - 2000

Professional Organizations

  • Forest Science, Editor-In-Chief (2011 - Current)
  • Weed Science Society of America, Full Member (2011 - Current)
  • Society of American Foresters, Fellow (1984 - Current)
  • Journal of Forestry, Editor (2005 - 2012)

Featured Publications & Products

Publications & Products

Research Highlights

HighlightTitleYear


NRS-2010-017
Wolf Recovery and the Future of Wisconsin's Forests: A Trophic Link

Overabundant white-tailed deer populations have serious negative effects on understory plant community structure and composition. Wolves, which ...

2010


Last updated on : 08/27/2014