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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Invasive Species

2012 Research Highlights
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Invasive species have significantly impacted United States ecosystems and cost millions of dollars to prevent, detect and control. The Forest Service Research and Development Invasive Species Program provides the scientific information, tools and methods for regulators, managers and the public to address invasive species. We work with many partners including local and international scientists, land managers and concerned citizens, to reduce, minimize or eliminate the introduction, establishment and spread of invasive species threats.

Forest Service Research and Development studies all sorts of invasive species: Insects, Plant Pathogens, Weeds, Fish & Aquatic, and Terrestrial Animals.

Select an Invasive Species Group

Features

link to Overarching Research Priorities

Overarching Research Priorities

Our research effort emphasizes the following research priorities:

  • Invasive Species Biology, Ecology, Interactions and Impacts
  • Forecasting and Prioritizing Invasive Species
  • Identifying and Detecting Invasive Species
  • Managing Invasive Species and Altered Systems

Spotlights

link to How Removal of Invasive Trees Affects Nesting Birds in Riparian Areas

How Removal of Invasive Trees Affects Nesting Birds in Riparian Areas

In New Mexico’s Middle Rio Grande corridor, birds nest in invasive exotic tree species, raising concern about removing these exotic trees for wildfire control. Would nesting be harmed?

link to Monitoring of Invasive Tree Takes Flight Over Ohio Forests

Monitoring of Invasive Tree Takes Flight Over Ohio Forests

Ailanthus altissima, a rapidly growing invasive non-native tree, is spreading into many forested landscapes in the eastern United States and displacing native plants.

link to Trap to Detect Asian Longhorned Beetles

Trap to Detect Asian Longhorned Beetles

Development of an operationally effective trap has been a goal of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Program since the first individual ALB was found in New York in 1996.