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Highlight IDTitleStrategic Program Area(s)YearStation
Photo of Woody debris after logging was removed at the site above; 3 years later Scotch broom, a nonnative invasive shrub, covered 26 percent of the area, whereas it covered 6 percent of the area when logging debris was left on site. Tim Harrington, Forest Service
ID: 341
More Scotch broom found where logging debris was removed

Scotch broom, a nonnative, invasive species, is a severe competitor of young Douglas-fir.

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Resource Management and Use2011PNW
Photo of Invasive Scotch broom shades out tree seedlings and other native vegatation. Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture
ID: 678
New Herbicides Developed to Fight Scotch Broom

Scotch broom is a large, nonnative shrub that has invaded forest sites throughout the Pacific Northwest. Three recently developed herbicides pro ...

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Invasive Species
Resource Management and Use
2014PNW
Photo of
ID: 342
Presence of tanoak reduces Douglas-fir mortality from black-stain root disease

Black-stain root disease is a native pathogen of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. The disease reduces growth and ultimately kills the infected ...

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Resource Management and Use2011PNW
Photo of A researcher collects a soil sample that will be analyzed to determine how retention of logging debris affects nutrient levels. Tim Harrington, USDA Forest Service
ID: 520
Some Logging Debris Cover Boosts Growth of Douglas-fir Seedlings on Low-nutrient Site

Stem growth of Douglas-fir seedlings with 40 percent debris cover and competing vegetation was greater than that of seedlings with zero or 80 pe ...

Principal Investigator : Timothy B. Harrington, Ph.D.

Resource Management and Use2013PNW