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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Feedbacks Through the Land Market Affect Success of Open Space Conservation Policy

Snapshot : A new planning tool helps decide which land parcels to save

Principal Investigators(s) :
Robert G. Haight 
Research Location : Washington
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2012
Highlight ID : 43

Summary

Nationwide, conservation organizations acquire sites to protect open space and wildlife habitat within or on the fringe of metropolitan areas. A Forest Service scientist has developed a planning to help organizations prioritize areas for open space conservation where development pressure is high and land conservation can have the unintended consequence of increasing land price, promoting development, and limiting future conservation options.

More than 80 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban areas, which are experiencing rapid growth and large-scale conversion of open space to development. Citizens are concerned about the resulting loss of open space. In response, local organizations have policies and funds to acquire land within or on the fringe of metropolitan areas. A fundamental question is how to prioritize site selections given finite budgets: should funds be spent on small, expensive parcels under high risk of development, or on larger, inexpensive parcels that are further away from population centers?

A Forest Service scientist developed a conservation planning tool that incorporates the effect of site selection decisions on land price and development. The tool helped prioritize land conservation decisions at Lopez Island, WA, close to Seattle, WA. The island supports many unique and sensitive wildlife species and habitats, but is under pressure for development.

A Forest Service scientist developed a conservation planning tool that incorporates the effect of site selection decisions on land price and development. The tool helped prioritize land conservation decisions at Lopez Island, WA, close to Seattle, WA. The island supports many unique and sensitive wildlife species and habitats, but is under pressure for development.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • University of Washington

Research Topics

Priority Areas

  • Resource Management and Use
  • Wildlife and Fish
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