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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Tools to help international conservation agencies make sound decisions

Eastern Threat Center scientists delivered training workshops for professionals from three African countries, highlighting models that quantify potential impact of land use practices on water quality and quantity. Erika Cohen, Forest ServiceSnapshot : Researchers with the Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) applied models they developed with partners to measure water supply stress in relation to carbon and biodiversity and to evaluate ecosystem services to several locations in Africa-Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda; Ruaha River Watershed, Tanzania; and Luangwa Valley, Zambia-to look at the potential impact of land use practices on water quality and quantity. These tools can be used by conservation agencies in any location worldwide to make sound decisions. This research is also important because the African ecosystems where these models are being applied are ecosystems that could potentially develop in the United States in the future due to the impacts of climate change.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Ge Sun 
Research Station : Southern Research Station (SRS)
Year : 2011
Highlight ID : 406

Summary

This project quantifies the potential impacts of land use practices on water quality and quantity in Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda; Ruaha River Watershed, Tanzania; and Luangwa Valley, Zambia, and in doing so provides quantitative information for conservation agencies to make sound decisions. Researchers EFETAC developed the Water Supply Stress Index-Carbon and Biodiversity (WaSSI-CB) model and the Natural Capital Project developed the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and tradeoffs (InVEST) model.

EFETAC scientists coordinated and delivered training workshops for professionals from the three African countries, and in September 2011, will present research results, implications, management recommendations, and technical training on using the WaSSI-CB and InVEST models to key stakeholders at a workshop in Raleigh, NC. The continual evolution of the WaSSI-CB model as it is applied internationally provides validation and improved application within the United States, and ultimately adds value to its use by land managers within the Forest Service.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • Forest Service International Programs Office, Daniel Boone National Forest, US Agency for International Development (USAID)