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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Visualizing carbon storage of harvested and burned forests

ForCaMF output showing non-soil carbon storage in all forests burned in Ravalli County, Montana, between 1999 and 2001. The 100-year projected carbon storage following observed fire patterns and intensities (blue) is contrasted with storage associated with the same stands if no fire had occurred (green). Error bars represent the standard deviation of 2000 simulations. Forest ServiceSnapshot : New research at the Rocky Mountain Research Station has developed a process to visualize how harvested and burned stands contribute to overall carbon storage over different time scales.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Healey, Sean P.  
Research Station : Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS)
Year : 2011
Highlight ID : 382

Summary

There is growing interest in documenting the capacity of forest ecosystems to sequester atmospheric carbon and mitigate climate change. New research at the Rocky Mountain Research Station has developed a process to visualize how harvested and burned stands contribute to overall carbon storage over different time scales. Called ForCaMF (Forest Carbon Management Framework), this framework applies a stand-level forest carbon simulation tool - the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) - spatially across vegetation and disturbance history maps. ForCaMF has been piloted in Montana, and is currently being implemented in the Northern Rockies Region of the National Forest System as part of a project supported in part by NASA.

More information is available in an upcoming Station publication Forest Carbon Decision Support through Probabilistic Interpretation of Widely Available Monitoring Data.

Research Topics

Priority Areas

  • Resource Management and Use
  • Climate Change