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US Forest Service Research & Development
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  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Effective treatments for eradication of Sudden Oak Death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, in nursery soils

Snapshot : Researchers at the University of California - Davis, funded via a grant from PSW's competitive Sudden Oak Death Research Program, determined that several registered fumigants and heat treatments are effective for eradication in nursery soils of sudden death oak pathogen.

Principal Investigators(s) :
Frankel, Susan J. 
Research Location : University of California Davis
Research Station : Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW)
Year : 2010
Highlight ID : 229

Summary

The sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, infects Rhododendron, Camellia and other popular horticultural plants. Nurseries under regulation are inspected before being allowed to ship plants. If the pathogen is detected they are required to eradicate the pathogen. Despite application of federally mandated eradication treatments, the pathogen persists in soil in some nurseries and reemerges to infect nursery stock. Researchers at the University of California - Davis, funded via a grant from PSW's competitive Sudden Oak Death Research Program, determined that several registered fumigants and heat treatments are effective for eradication in nursery soils. This work provides growers with greater flexibility and reliability as they attempt to treat nursery areas infested with P. ramorum and is being used throughout the United States nursery industry as part of the USDA Animal and Plant Disease Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Confirmed Nursery Protocol. By reducing the likelihood for spread of P. ramorum via nursery stock, this project prevents pathogen transfer to uninfested areas.

Research Topics

Priority Areas

  • Invasive Species
  •