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US Forest Service Research & Development
Contact Information
  • US Forest Service Research & Development
  • 1400 Independence Ave., SW
  • Washington, D.C. 20250-0003
  • 800-832-1355
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Research Highlights

Individual Highlight

Shrubland Birds and Their Habitats

Snapshot : Shrubland birds, such as prairie warblers and field sparrows require constant habitat management, and thus, reliable and specific knowledge to guide management efforts is urgently needed. NRS researchers David King and Mariko Yamasaki have been providing expert advice based on their research for state and federal land managers as well as private individuals, in both formal and informal settings.

Principal Investigators(s) :
David KingMariko Yamasaki
Research Location : nationwide
Research Station : Northern Research Station (NRS)
Year : 2010
Highlight ID : 216

Summary

Populations of shrubland birds all over North America have decreased to historical lows, causing great concern among managers, researchers, and the birding public. Not only are birds highly important ecologically, they are valued by Americans. According to the USFWS, 20 percent of the US population watches or feeds birds, spending 85 billion dollars and creating 800,000 jobs. Unfortunately, 13 percent of the world's birds are threatened with extinction in the near future.

Shrubland birds, such as prairie warblers and field sparrows require constant habitat management, and thus, reliable and specific knowledge to guide management efforts is urgently needed. NRS researchers David King and Mariko Yamasaki have been providing expert advice based on their research for state and federal land managers as well as private individuals, in both formal and informal settings. Examples from 2010 include joining the Science and Technical Advisory Committee to guide habitat management on the watershed for Boston's water supply and addressing 120 foresters at their annual workshop in New Hampshire. Topics include recommendations for using silviculture and prescribed fire for improving shrubland bird habitat, as well as the effect of fuels reduction, invasive plants and urbanization on shrubland birds. King and Yamasaki have also trained numerous agency and extension personnel, who are often the first to receive questions from homeowners and private forest landowners about habitat management.

Forest Service Partners

External Partners

 
  • UMass Amherst, the White Mountain National Forest, MassWildlife, Connecticut DEP, the NRCS, the Northeast Utilities Foundation, and the Massachusetts Audubon Society

Research Topics

Priority Areas

  • Wildlife and Fish
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