2. SAN JUAN NATIONAL FOREST TOILET CONSTRUCTION

San Juan National Forest

Project Type: Toilet Construction

Year Completed: Chimney Rock Phase 2

completed in calendar year 1997

Haviland Lake Campground

Toilets completed in calendar

year 1997

 

Budget (Design

and Constructed): Chimney Rock Phase 2

Contract Award -$349,111.50

Final Contract Price -$358,121.82

Contract Award Toilet Item 1 -$88,660.06

Final Toilet Item 1 -$98,637.72

Contract Award Toilet Item 2 -$85,660.06

Final Toilet Item 2 -$95,637.72

 

Haviland Lake Composting Toilets

Contract Award -$114,750

Final Contract Price -$128,394.43

Contract Award Toilet Item 1 -$57,375

Final Toilet Item 1 -$67,604.02

Contract Award Toilet Item 2 -$57,375

Final Toilet Item 2 -$60,790.14

 

Project Team: San Juan National Forest:

Engineer Technician,

Landscape Architects, Forest

Landscape Architect, and the

Forest Engineer, plus an

architect from the Rocky

Mountain Regional Office.

 

The San Juan National Forest leadership team,

on the recommendation of the forest design

team, approved a standard toilet design that

would be constructed at recreation facilities

identified with a Recreation Opportunity

Spectrum (ROS) of Roaded Natural through

Rural. Forest maintenance personnel and the

forest design team designed and recommended

a masonry building because of the long-term

durability and ease of maintenance of masonry.

The standard building design features two

barrier-free compartments, a separate

storage area, a full-width stairway (7 feet

4 inches wide), a full-depth basement, and a

compost/evaporative waste management

system.

 

The standard toilet design allows for minor

alterations to meet specific site characteristics.

Minor alterations are primarily color selection

of the following elements: metal roof, masonry

block, gable ends, soffits, trim, and doors. In

addition, the option of photovoltaic power or

electric power may be selected. In some cases,

special alterations may be implemented, in

addition to the minor alterations, to meet sites

classified as “special places.” These special

alterations include the addition of stone veneer

and/or special siding materials.

 

Chimney Rock Archeological Area may be

identified as a “special place.” The site offers

outstanding scenic beauty and contains the

remains of a significant pre-Columbian Indian

Culture as well as other historic uses. The area

is located in a diverse landscape, rich with

interesting geological features and landforms

composed of mesas, valleys, and hills. It is

associated with dry ponderosa pine and pinyonjuniper

forests, as well as native grasslands

and sagebrush lands.

 

The archeological area has a range of targeted

ROS classifications. The range is from Primitive

to Rural. The target ROS of toilet structure one,

located at the primary public contact point, is

Rural; the ROS of toilet structure two, located

at the main archeological interpretive area, is

Roaded Natural.

 

Both sites are well-suited for the standard toilet

design with both minor and special alterations.

In addition to selecting a suitable color scheme

(minor alterations), extensive stone veneer was

incorporated into the base of both building

facades and stucco was utilized in the midwall

sections (special alterations). The addition of

the special alteration elements enable these

modern buildings to harmonize with the existing

stone character of the archeological sites and

the historic fire tower.

 

In addition to the implementation of the minor

alterations, special alterations were incorporated

into the design. The use of a stone veneer base

at toilet structure one, the primary public

contact, anchored the structure to the landform.

In addition, it introduced the visitors to the

archeological and historic use of stone. The use

of stucco (color selection) in the midwall section

allows the structure to further blend with

existing site colors as well as provide a textural

change. In addition, the implementation of the

elements identified in minor alterations reinforced

specific site characteristics (color). Electric

power was selected for this structure, as it

permits a higher evaporative capacity. As the

first and primary public contact point, the need

for maximum evaporative capacity was identified.

 

The use of a stone veneer base at toilet structure

two, the primary archeological interpretive area,

enabled the structure to blend with the abundant

archeological and historic sites. The use of stucco

(color selection) in the midwall section allows the

structure to further blend with existing site

colors as well as provide a textural change. In

addition, the implementation of the elements

identified in minor alterations reinforced specific

site characteristics (color). Photovoltaic power

was selected for this structure. The anticipated

evaporative needs at this site would be less, as

most users would have used structure one.

Moreover the specific site characteristics, that

is, elevation and vegetation cover, create an

ideal opportunity for photovoltaic power.

 

Haviland Lake Campground is a heavily used

campground facility located in southwestern

Colorado. The site is located in the upper Animas

River Valley, under the backdrop of the scenic

Hermosa Cliffs and at an approximate elevation of

8,200 feet. It is part of a mountainous landscape,

composed of ponderosa pine forests and glacial

landforms. The campground is located in a diverse

microecological setting, composed of park-like

ponderosa pine forest and gambrel oak hillsides

intermixed with riparian and wetland areas.

 

The campground has a ROS classification of

Roaded Natural, and is therefore well-suited for

the standard toilet design with minor alterations.

 

A split face masonry block was used in the base

section to attempt to solidify the connection

between site and building through the use of

texture. A smooth face masonry block was used

in the midwall sections to diversify the visual

mass through a change in materials. In addition,

a suitable color scheme (minor alterations) was

selected and implemented for the proposed site

structures. The color scheme allowed the buildings

to merge with the existing site character and

created a consistent architectural theme.

 

 

Photovoltaic power was selected for both

structures. However, as the facilities were used,

one of the structures was converted to electric

power as it required greater evaporative capacity

than the photovoltaic power would supply.

 

Use/Evaluation: The two examples discussed,

Chimney Rock Archeological Area and Haviland

Lake Campground, attempt to illustrate how

a “standard design” can be utilized throughout

while permitting alterations to suit sites with

special needs. The toilet structures at Chimney

Rock Archeological Area have been positively

received. The appealing aesthetics, the use of a

biological waste management system, and the

appropriate selection of both electric and

photovoltaic power are the basis for the high

approval rate. The toilet structures at Haviland

Lake Campground have received mixed opinions;

the use of masonry block, the scale of the

building, the biological waste management

system, and the use of a power source, either

photovoltaic or electric, deviate from the

historic Forest Service outhouses. However,

initial public reaction is positive.

 

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